Your Favorite Liqueur

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  • #608075

    rashba
    Member

    I would like to get a liqueur to drink a little on Shabbos Kodesh. Just want to do something special.

    Would be interested in your opinions.

    Thank you

  • #928165

    DaasYochid
    Participant

    Drambuie

  • #928166

    YW Moderator-007
    Moderator

    What hechsher is Drambuie under?

  • #928167

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    London Beis din. See their website.

  • #928168

    oomis
    Member

    Vanilla Vodka – something new that came out last year (or at least I just became aware of it). Chill it and it is spectacular (and I am not even a drinker!!!!)

  • #928169

    Toi
    Member

    Yech. marco!

  • #928170

    yaff80
    Member

    Def Drambui. I have it every shabbos. It has the KLBD logo on the bottle. It is a whiskey based liquer, therefore is probably not so suited to woman.

  • #928171

    outreach613
    Participant

    Glayva

  • #928172

    rashba
    Member

    thanks

    i checked on vv and drambuie

    both are about 40% alcohol

    im looking for something milder

    like perhaps below 20%

  • #928173

    moi aussi
    Member

    Peter Heering Cherry Liqueur

  • #928174

    DaasYochid
    Participant

    Schmerling Chocolate liqueur

  • #928175

    rashba
    Member

    The glayva looks very interesting and unique but also strong and expensive. It’s whiskey based, which is not a plus for me.

    The chocolate one is relatively cheap and the one review I saw was excellent. Besides, it’s chocolate. The clear winner so far for me.

    Moi, I’ve tried Cherry Heering liqueur. Do you know if it’s similar to Peter Heering?

  • #928176

    rebdoniel
    Member

    The Schmerling liqueur is great for making decadent desserts at fleshig meals.

    I made a trifle once, using a parve Dunchan Hines chocolate mix, parve whipped topping (Eden or Rich’s, IIRC), parve chocolate shavings, and topped each serving with a shtickle of the Schmerling. To die for.

    A shame is that kosher kahlua must be brought in from Mexico.

    I am still on the hunt for acceptable Grand Marnier, Framboises, Sambuca, and Campari. Any suggestions?

  • #928177

    oomis
    Member

    Godiva makes a chocolate liqueur that is pareve. it’s delish also.

  • #928178

    alter bochur
    Participant

    herman jansen chocolate mint

  • #928179

    DaasYochid
    Participant

    Rebdoniel,

    I found Campari listed on kosherliquorlist. com. Apprently, some bottles have Rav Gorelik’s hechsher, and KLBD may certify as well (check that out because these things can change, and I don’t know if that site is reliable).

  • #928180

    DaasYochid
    Participant

    Oomis, is the brown Godiva still parve?

  • #928181

    147
    Participant

    Advocaat is always by far, superior to all other liqueurs.

  • #928182

    Drambuie is not SUPERVISED by the london beis din, it is APPROVED, which is similar to the list system used in europe, meaning that the beis din know the ingredients and have checked them out, but have never actually been down to the factory.

    The london beis din has two separate logos, the hebrew one is actually a hechsher, meaning that they have the level nichnas veyoitzei required by shulchan oruch, the english lettering means apprpoved.

    London beis din was headed until a few years ago by the ga’on r’ chanoich ehrentrau, today it is headed by r’ menachem gelley, and rabbbi jeffrey conway is responsible for kashruth issues.

  • #928183

    If you are looking for a good liquer with a good hechsher i would rerccomend either shmerling chocolate, or there is a liquer called advoscotch, which althoughg whiskey based is only about 17%, and is an improvement on advoca’at.

    as an aside, brittish researchers have shown that people who drink 40 ml of liquer twice a week, or 200 ml of wine are healthier.

  • #928184

    spiral
    Member

    Binyamina chocolate liquor is the favorite of most women in my shul. It’s thick and real chocolaty. At home we prefer homemade liquor, but Binyamina comes close.

  • #928185

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    goldersgreener: I’m American, and I don’t feel meshubad to get involved in British kosher politics. I’m confident in the london beis din, and if they say it is kosher, I drink it ?????.

  • #928186

    oomis
    Member

    DaasYochid

    Member

    Oomis, is the brown Godiva still parve”

    I haven’t bought it in a couple of years (I still have one bottle from years ago, that’s how little we booze it up in my house), but I have heard that it still is pareve. The white chocolate was milchig (though I heard a rumor that it was pareve, but I never was fully invested in buying any, so I haven’t checked). At one time I think the dark chocolate was milchig, but I believe that changed some time ago. My bottle is definitely pareve. Next time I am near my local kosher wine shop, I will ask them bli neder.

  • #928187

    The Godiva liqueur became milchig about a year ago, if you look around you may be able to find a pareve one still on the shelves. After Godiva my favorite is Herman Jansen Chocolate mint and Starbucks Coffee liqueur,I’m a big coffee fan :). I personally don’t like Shmerling’s because its thicker like a chocolate syrup and I prefer liqueur with a thinner texture, but its great for pouring on desserts!

  • #928188

    Popa, it sounds a little stupid to rely on a hachsher if they the,selves only give it an approved status, not a full one. That’s not politics, it’s simply closing your eyes. (i’m not sure whose on which side, but carrying in the london eiruv might be “politics”.)

    Goldersgreener, thanks for the info. i have always wondered what the difference is between their hebrew hechsher, and english “house” KLBD logo.

  • #928189

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    Popa, it sounds a little stupid to rely on a hachsher if they the,selves only give it an approved status, not a full one. That’s not politics, it’s simply closing your eyes.

    Amazing. Simply amazing. It is stupid to rely on a hechsher when the approve something. I think you’ll need to elaborate on that one.

    But before you do, I’ll let you in on a secret: All hashgachos do it, even on things that they actively certify. They have lists of ingredients that are permitted, even though nobody certified the manufacture of those ingredients. American hashgachos call those “Schedule A ingredients”.

    If you don’t trust the stuff on their approved list, you cannot eat anything on their regular list either, since it may contain ingredients from their approved list. Certainly in an establishment certified by the London Beis Din, they allow the kitchen to cook with things from the approved list.

  • #928190

    rashba
    Member

    thank you everyone

    I’ve decided on

    1. benyamina

    2. schmerlings

    depends on what i can find locally

  • #928191

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    Advocaat is always by far, superior to all other liqueurs.

    This is true. I like the one by Bols, and I found it in a chassidishe liquor store in Monsey (the one in the little mall type place next to the big grocery store, where you drive down a steep hill into the parking lot).

  • #928192

    The Best Bubby
    Participant

    goldersgreener: The Kashrus issues of the London Beth Din are dealt with Rabbi JEREMY Conway. He davens in Bridge Lane Beth Hamedrash with Rabbi Shimon Winegarten Shilita. The logo of the Beth Din is a very superior hechsher. Everything is checked out, from the pipes that feed the water from the source, the steamers, the central heating pipes that may be connected to other sources etc. Rabbi Conway goes to all these factories and speaks about his findings at BLBH to packed audiences. One year, he even described how Rav Landau Shilita gives the hechsher for Pesach on Coca Cola. Now, THAT is for a different discussion!

  • #928193

    The best bubby, thanks for the corrections. [i didn’t mean to say that thay have never been down to the factory, what i

    meant was that there was a difference between the regular level of nuchnas ve’yoitzei [done without prior warning], and a one time, or even annual visit] Although i do not know rabbi conway personally, e widely recognised as anexcellent maven in today’s food technologies etc..

    PBA, i meant nothing against the london beis din, all i meant to

    say was that they have a lower level of supervision on drambuiee, and to reccomend other liquers with full supervision. Sorry for the misunderstanding.

    I am not aware of all their rules, i am however aware that many hachsherim “approve” things and mentiiion that they are bishul accum, or even cholov accum, so it is important to keep up to date of the various changes. They publish an annual list under the name “the real kosher food guide.”

    At the same time, i must point out that it is out of place to refer to this basic information as “british politics”, i meant no more than simple facts that everyone agrees on.

  • #928194

    147
    Participant

    goldersgreener:- FYI:- The London Beth Din is absolutely impecable, so don’t even entertain any aspersions against them Chas vSholom.

  • #928195

    SaysMe
    Member

    my brother just bought the shmerlings a few weeks ago and labeled it disgusting…

  • #928196

    moi aussi
    Member

    Cool Brasil Chocolate Mint Liqueur has a hechsher from the Holland (Netherlands) Rabbinate

  • #928197

    Hey, Popa, I didn’t realsie that you that sensitive.

    To label the distinction between approved and superivised british poloitics is the equivalent of a brit saying that the differenced between florsheim and nike is stupid politics, and they are both shoes.

    Additionally many hashgachot rely on approved lists for basic raw ingredients, such as ground coffee, honey, fruit juices etc…, however that does not mean that they would use more complicated things.

    147, the london is undoubtedly impeccable, so are the OU, and many other hechsherim, however they are still entitled to issue different levels of supervision.

    Goldeers greener thanks for the info. i’m slowly building up a picture of euripean hechsherim.

  • #928198

    sorry popa,i actually think your comparison is like comparing two blood pressure pills without knowing whether they are supposed to raise or lower the pressure.

    Anyone with yiras shomayim understands the importance of accurate information in kashrus.

    Best bubby, perhaps the factoies Rabbi conway so dramatically describes are the factories that he supervises rather than those that they simply approve??????

  • #928199

    Kosher Ham
    Member
  • #928200

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    sorry popa,i actually think your comparison is like comparing two blood pressure pills without knowing whether they are supposed to raise or lower the pressure.

    http://www.theyeshivaworld.com/coffeeroom/topic/popa-figures-out-more-stuff

  • #928201

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    For the record, I don’t know what narishkeit you are inventing, but Drambuie is listed on the KLBD website as “certified”. http://www.klbdkosher.org/certified_companies/?doCompanySearch=1&resultsPage=&query=drambuie&categoryId=17&searchButton.x=35&searchButton.y=10

    And there is no designation on their website of any two tier hashgacha system.

  • #928202

    Toi
    Member

    ichsa. single malt only.

  • #928203

    DaasYochid
    Participant

    Good. Now I can continue to make Kiddush and Havdallah on a revi’is of Drambuie (Chasing Ish shiur, of course).

  • #928204

    Hu Ika Anuh
    Member

    1. The new Walders coffee is great

    2. Peter Heering coffee is good

    3. Disaronno terrific but expensive

    All are best straight from freezer

    The above are considered “Vaberish” bronfin

  • #928205

    PBA, sorry for any misunderstandings that i may have indirectly caused, …. but i am bit interested in knowing what is wrong with the moshol of SSA, at least the one to the diferent makes of shoes?

    I assume that you are not just using rhetoric to cancel her point, because you yourself are doing what you accuse her of doing.

  • #928206

    DaasYochid
    Participant

    The difference between approved and certified is, or at least should be, that the company is obligated to keep, with a penalty for violating, the standards of the certifying agency.

    I would be amazed to hear that any reputable agency would allow its symbol to be used without recourse for violations.

    Maybe the shoe comparison has some merit, but the blood pressure medication anology was odd. Obviously, an approval and a certification are doing the same thing – demonstrating the kashrus of a product.

  • #928207

    popa, i am not sure if to take you seriously, but just in case you really didn’t understand, i will explain in very simple terms.

    You wrote that as far as you are concerned kosher is kosher, to which i responded that to categorise eveerything as kosher, independent of the standard of kashrut is equivalent to catergorizing all shoes together, or even all blood pressure medication as one, and insist that you know of no difference between them.

    Mpsholim are a classic way to bring out a point, but as ahtey say ?? ?????? ?????? so i guess that thye are not for everyone.

  • #928208

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    Sorry, folks, I’m still not responding to mesholim.

    I thought this would be over after I showed that it is “certified” and that their website doesn’t reference a two tier system, but if you must, I will respond.

    If I understand correctly, your point is that if the hashgacha offers “certification” and “approval”, it is possible that one is being machmir if one eats only the “certified” stuff, since it seems more verified.

    My initial strong response to this was based on the fact that golders did not simply refer to it as a chumrah, but instead stated that “meaning that they have the level nichnas veyoitzei required by shulchan oruch”–thereby implying that the approved list was against halacha. Without getting into why you are wrong on halacha, it is obviously libelous to say that the LBD is approving things contrary to halacha.

    My reply to your argument of chumrah, being advocated by Shoe Sales, is that since the same hashgacha holds of both methods, and presumably relies on its approved lists when certifying foods that have components on the approved list, as is also commonly done in the US, there is no chumrah since there is no way of knowing that the certified stuff does not contain approved stuff.

    SS responded to that by claiming that they would not use any of the “complicated” approved stuff. Since the discussion had become speculation then, I didn’t reply. Especially since replying would have required a technical understanding of blood pressure medication (since I presumably would need to respond to the moshol from within it) which I do not have.

    Now tell me: Didn’t I present the arguments far better than any moshol could?

    This is similar to a King who had a son who had sinned against him, but the son did not understand why. So the King called in his son, and he explained to him how his feelings were hurt when the son did such and such, and how it is inappropriate to hurt your father the King’s feelings. The son understood, and refrained from sinning again.

  • #928209

    DaasYochid
    Participant

    Popa,

    Are you maskim to me that there’s a maaleh in certified over approved?

  • #928210

    Golders Greener, since you blatantly lied when you said that they don’t go to the factory, and then later acted as though that was a minor oversight, I don’t think that you have much credibility on this subject.

  • #928211

    twisted
    Member

    a)grappa, distilled from large amounts of wine that went bad. It has a smokey chocolate character at 80 proof.

    b) things you can make with pure alcohol. In EY, you can get stuff like Everclear, but distilled from grapes and kosher le pesach. With this I have made myrtle berry, by soaking the berries and then cutting by 50%, limoncello, a decoction of lemon zest and sugar syrup. You can also make chocolate liquor fairly easily, but it takes three months. Etrog would be nice, but it is nearly impossible to get organic fruit. The ordinary specimen is laced with pesticides.

  • #928212

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    Are you maskim to me that there’s a maaleh in certified over approved?

    No, because I assume they use approved components in the certified plants.

  • #928213

    DaasYochid
    Participant

    The approved components are usually the types of things that are never problematic, but something like Drambuie has ingredients which could be problematic (glycerin, for example).

  • #928214

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    I don’t think that is responsive to my point. My point is that when you buy ice cream which is certified, you would have no way of knowing if one of the ingredients is Drambuie which under goldersgreen’s bubbe maisa would only be approved.

    To make this more likely, imagine the approved thing was cookies, and the certified ice cream was cookies n’ cream.

  • #928215

    I like Kedem 144. Also Joyvin, Malvasia (both types) and Matuk Kal on Pesach.

  • #928216

    DaasYochid
    Participant

    I don’t think that is responsive to my point.

    Maybe you didn’t understand. Shall I explain it with a moshol? 🙂

    My point is that when you buy ice cream which is certified, you would have no way of knowing if one of the ingredients is Drambuie which under goldersgreen’s bubbe maisa would only be approved.

    My point was that I don’t think Drambuie should be approved without certification, because the flavorings are kashrus sensitive. A moshol for that would be cookies, which are also kashrus sensitive. They wouldn’t allow them to be used in ice cream without certification. Whereas, the sugar, which is not so kashrus sensitive, would be approved, not necessarily certified.

    At one time, Drambuie was not certified, but was used in Europe. The kashrus experts in the U.S. with whom I spoke were very critical of its use without certification, and felt that the kashrus standards in Europe, where they relied on ingredient listings and some communication with the manufacturers, were anachronistic.

  • #928217

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    You are correct; I didn’t understand. I thought you were arguing that we should eat things which are certified but not which are approved. You are actually arguing we should not trust hechsherim which approve things without certification.

    Ok, if you insist. I don’t agree; I trust them, and if they say it doesn’t need hashgacha, then it doesn’t.

  • #928218

    DaasYochid
    Participant

    I’m not making a broad generalization; I think it depends on the type of item.

    Also, I never meant that approved is not good, just that certified is better.

  • #928219

    haifagirl
    Member

    I just read this thread and I’m curious as to why people feel that men and women have different tastes in alcohol and why women would necessarily want something sickly sweet as opposed to a good single-malt scotch.

  • #928220

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    Also, I never meant that approved is not good, just that certified is better.

    Don’t backtrack here; you were doing better before. Now you are back to my previous problem that since the hashgacha relies on itself, you have no way of being confident that your certified product does not contain approved products.

  • #928221

    DaasYochid
    Participant

    you have no way of being confident that your certified product does not contain approved products.

    That’s true. I also didn’t say hashgochas are perfect. We’re kind of playing the odds. I’m not backtracking (I used the word maaleh for certified, I didn’t passel approved), although I’m probably not explaining myself well.

    Other than homemade, there’s no guarantee of kashrus even with the best hechsherim (the Satmar rov Zt”l didn’t like the term “mehadrin” for this reason). When we’re too lazy or busy to make everything from scratch, we try to get as close, in reliability, as possible. Of course it would be great to have mashgiach temidi for everything, but we don’t want to pay the price. So we employ all types of methods of keeping the food kosher al pi din, in the most economical way.

    Even if one more step in the process is supervised, the level of reliability has gone up. So if there are legitimate grounds to be mattir, for example, unflavered beer without a hechsher, there is still a market for certified beer, as evidenced by the fact that there are now many beers with hechsherim (not muchrach, I know, because it’s good marketing for non-religious reasons as well).

    Still, I would prefer popa’s home brew (it’s probably a thousand time tastier as well, but that’s besides the point). And I know that popa uses approved components, but we have a maaleh in one step of the process.

    I’ll give you a moshol. There was once a king who needed to go to the bank to withdraw money. He walked up to the teller to withdraw money, and presented his ATM card. He was about to put in his pin #, when his trusted advisor told him (in pig latin) to cover the buttons so that the teller couldn’t see. Now, the computer techs at the bank could hack into his account, and so could some hacker in Nigeria (or wherever hackers are from). The advisor himself knows the pin as well, so the king could easily taaneh that there’s no guarantee that his money is safe, so who cares if one more person, the teller, has the pin? But it would not be a good taaneh, because prudence still dictates minimizing exposure to risk.

    So too by us. Even if hechsherim rely on approved components when necessary, why wouldn’t I want something which was processed and finished (usually the most kashrus sensitive area) under supervision? Sure, if I was making a sholom zochor and couldn’t find certified beer, I would use approved. But when certified is available, I buy that. And if I had the time and know-how (and wasn’t afraid of explosions) I would make my own.

  • #928222

    zahavasdad
    Participant

    Sam Adams is the best domestic beer

    And nothing beats a few shots of Tequilla

  • #928223

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    Sam Adams is the best domestic beer

    Excuse my face? My very own ??? ???????, special reserve ale, is the very best beer in the land.

  • #928224

    yitayningwut
    Member

    haha good name 😀

    do you ever look at it and exclaim ???? ??? ???????

  • #928225

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    lol

  • #928226

    DaasYochid
    Participant

    Popa, that’s not fair, how’s he supposed to know that you live in the US? For all we know, you might live in Bavel.

  • #928227

    Veltz meshugene

    “Golders Greener, since you blatantly lied when you said that they don’t go to the factory, and then later acted as though that was a minor oversight, I don’t think that you have much credibility on this subject.”

    I clearly explained that they do go to the factory on a yoitzei veniuchnos – i.e. unaanounced visits at all times of operations.

    By the way it happens to be true.

  • #928228

    Golders greener, i think you mean to say that thay do NOT go to the factore on a yoitzei ve’nichnas for approved products.

    If you meant something else pleasse explain.

    Popa, i can only rely on what i see over here and have heard from other european sources, but as i far as i have understood, the approved label, or lists, in europe, does not necassarily mean that they feel that it does not need hashgacha, but simply that according to the basic information they have they cannot see a problem. I am unaware if and when they actually visit a factory, but i found it hard to beleive that every hasahgacha has sent their own people to every factory on the list. Perhaps they rely on each other.

    The reason for this is that the kosher consumer market is simply not big enough in europe to encourage any major producer – such as drambuiee – to agree to full certifiacation.

    I am unaware of the requirements os shulchan Oruch, and what is needed.

    Numerous people have assured me that they no self respecting hechsher uses complicated ingredients from their lists for fully supervised products, with the exception of sugars etc..

    No offence meant, but to suggest otherwise is being ???? ??? on many choshuve european poskim – including R’ Chanoich ehrentrau shlit”a, and R’ heinoich Padwa zatza”l.

    I have also been told that many of these rabbonim themselves do not rely on their lists, in fact apparently R’ Ehrentrau does not even carry in his own eiruv,

  • #928229

    shoe store assistant, i did in fact to mean that thay do NOT go to the factories on a nichans ve’yoitzai basis – i suspect that the mods decided to change it.

    BTW, R’ hennoch padwa zatza”l was on the kedassia beis din in london – a smaller hechsher serving the yeshivish and chassidish communities, not the london beis din, his hechsher did not produce a full list, only a much smaller list on medicines etc…

    R’ ehrentrau does not carry in any eiruv.

  • #928230

    I just saw this post and noticed people referenced to a website kosherliquorlist.

    I checked out that site and noticed that they list Jameson Irish whiskey as “Kosher for Mehadrin – not aged in sherry cask”

    This is not true. The Jameson website clearly says “Balance the sweet, nutty flavour from Sherry casks with the toasted wood and vanilla notes from Bourbon casks.”

    This site is either outdated, or simply not reliable. For reliable information, go to the cRc Chicago’s website. They are on the cutting edge, constantly updating their list.

    link edited out

  • #928231

    rabbi_dr
    Member

    Whatever liqueur you choose, put it in a chocolate shot-glass (on sale on groupon) let it sit, drink the liqueur, and then eat the shot-glass!

    Do not post links

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