How should one protest against shmoozers during davening?

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  • #1806006

    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    שיבה is an acronym שתיקה יפה בשעת התפילה.

    #1805998

    RebbeDebbie
    Participant

    Why not try another shul?

    #1806036

    iacisrmma
    Participant

    Wow a discussion from 2012 that had no additions in 7 years gets bumped with a link to a 2018 thread and a suggestion to try another shul. Maybe someone should rethink about bumping dormant threads.

    #1806046

    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Silencing a loud schmoozer in shul in 2019 has changed substantially since 2012 where a poster noted that the preferred approach was for the gabbai rishon to get in the face of the offender and scream “sheigetz aross”.. Today, we use more subtle means of shaming the individual such as having the shalicach tzibur klop on the bimah and admonish the tzibur to daven more quietly since those sitting close by to Reb Shvuntz are having a hard time hearing him. If that doesn’t work, the following Shabbos he may find his shtender relocated to the small closet behind the varbeshe section where they keep the cleaning supplies. Other new high tech options include a Shabbos “taser for talkers” or including his photo in th0se annoying pop-up ads on “Stop the Talking in Shul”.

    #1806045

    Little Froggie
    Participant

    Word is getting around… I’ve noticed more shuls being quieter…

    On a different note… interesting this topic just got bumped now… there was a Torah dedication last week. The donor was actually not a mispalel of that shul. He chanced by once and noticed there is absolutely NO TALKING there period. He was big onto the movement of not talking in shul. So he decided to donate a Sefer Torah to that shul.

    #1821280

    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    Why does it say, stop the talking in shul, rather than stop talking in shul? Aren’t the gaboim responsible to stop the talking? You only make them angry if you tell them to stop talking. They know there are not suppose to talk and they still talk. If they talk they feel that they have a heter. The Rav should emphasize the importance of not talking.

    #1821276

    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    After exhaustive research, I’ve confirmed the argument offered by some that it indeed is much quieter in reform shuls than orthodox shuls during the davening. I have a federal grant application pending for supplemental research to determine whether the former can be linked to the fact that the reform shuls generally don’t have enough attendees to constitute a minyan (even if you extend your “not one”, “not two” ) to the varbeshe section.

    #1821388

    banjobob
    Participant

    mallets work pretty well

    #1821433

    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    There is a Smak who says to make a kal vechomer from the goyim who sit like a statue in church. Some excuse us that we feel comfortable as being at home in shul.

    #1821450

    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    banjojob: A real mallet may be muktzah on shabbos whereas using a wood panel from a broken shtender or an empty bottle from the kiddush club doesn’t raise such concerns and is equally effective in getting the schmoozer’s attention.

    #1821903

    banjobob
    Participant

    go to the White House with signs and posters and try to impeach the gabbai

    #1821911

    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    GH, A thing that is used for issur work can be used for its own benefit or place like a hammer to crack nuts. We can use the mallet for a heterdige melocha to stop people talking.

    #1821997

    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Rav Elizer: Very interesting psak….in whose name was it brought down that such tactics were used during the time of the achronim?

    #1822020

    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    GH, I didn’t say it was used. I said it could be used because it is nor muktzah.

    #1823806

    ChananiaL
    Participant

    Best idea is simply to find another shul instead of working yourself up over something it’s very unlikely you can change.

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