Most Uncommon Frum Names

Home Forums Decaffeinated Coffee Most Uncommon Frum Names

  • This topic contains 252 replies, has 84 voices, and was last updated by  mom12 9 years ago.
Viewing 50 posts - 51 through 100 (of 253 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #740837

    Bear: I don’t know, but I’m really hoping those aren’t numbers from a uniform such as worn in the federal Kollel.

    #740838

    A600KiloBear
    Participant

    BS”D

    You got it. Those are register numbers from Federal Koilelim in Otisville and Fort Dix. Pls delete the actual numbers now that the cat is out of the bag; they may be back-traceable to the actual yungerleit.

    #740839

    mom12
    Participant

    U wanna tell us???

    #740840

    mom12
    Participant

    Thanx-

    you should know my friends husband had to sit ..

    for not wanting to masser on others

    she said he did more learning behind bars then he did at home!

    #740841

    A600KiloBear
    Participant

    BS”D

    The Spinka rebbe is also sitting rather than moisering (how did that become massering – I know everyone says that but maaser is tzedoko not being a stooge)! On the other hand we have Mr D-ek who became a professional moiser and still is getting five years which he won’t enjoy because a stool pigeon gets no respect in the can.

    #740842

    NY Mom
    Member

    SJS: Well, many of the old regular posters have not been around for awhile, and there was this thread discussing it.

    Also, a couple of days ago we jumped the gun welcoming you back here.

    So welcome back for real this time! 🙂

    #740843

    NY Mom
    Member

    SJS: Almost forgot! You were also mentioned recently here.

    So you see? You were missed!

    #740844

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    HAHA! I saw that thread and it made me laugh.

    #740845

    dunno
    Member

    Kraindel

    #740846

    mom12
    Participant

    I stand corrected.

    now back to the original topic -unusual names-

    we really went off on a tangent here…where does the Dubbi come from?

    I thoght perhaps Devora-but there is another sister with that name.

    #740847

    A600KiloBear
    Participant

    BS”D

    Dubi – probably from Doba. No idea what the origin of the name is but it seems to come from Russia.

    #740848

    jphone
    Member

    Speaking of strange names for Jews….

    Mark, Matthew, Paul, Peter, Jerome (lots of yidden use these names, all are names of “the apostles”).

    #740849

    Jothar
    Member

    There are a lot of these Russian names which are hard to trace. Masha, Pesha, Pesia, Mushka, Musha, Rasha, Rashka, etc.

    #740850

    mom12
    Participant

    So u wouldnt say it derives from Dvora

    The truth so many nick names over the generations became common given names..

    is chanzi perhaps really chana?

    #740851

    A600KiloBear
    Participant

    BS”D

    When I started the common names thread I meant kodesh names. If we want to get into secular names we can really have fun.

    We have a Gruzini guy in shul named Gamlet (as in Hamlet, of Shakespeare fame). His sister or cousin is registered as Madonna but she uses her Hebrew name Chaya Malka for obvious reasons. I do not think her parents know the source of the name; she probably is named for the singer because they thought the name was nice and it is common in Gruziya and Armenia to choose fancy foreign names for girls.

    #740852

    squeak
    Participant

    SJSinNYC

    Member

    I call my husband Jose all the time! His name is Joseph.

    YIIIIIIIIIIKES!!!!!!!!

    Say it ain’t so, Joe

    #740853

    oomis
    Participant

    P4M, why do you think I am missing the boat (I wouldn’t get on a boat anyhow)? I believe strongly in the concept that Am Yisroel’s big zechus, among others, in Galus Mitzrayim was that they did not change their names. We are in Galus America here, and it would seem to me to be way harder for a Jew named Moishie or Devorah to assimilate than it is for a Mark or a Diane. In any case, I have a strong love for Loshon Kodesh, and feel that it is the right thing for my children to be named for the Hebrew names of those long-gone relatives even when said relatives were referred to by their secluar names), and in a case where the name was Yiddish, we translated it into the exact Hebrew (Faigeh to Tzipporah, for example).

    #740854

    A600KiloBear
    Participant

    BS”D

    Pesha comes from Basya, Rasha and Rashka probably from Rus. Chanzi is Chana, yes. Doba could come from dobry, Russian for good or kind or it could have been made up in memory of a DovBer.

    #740855

    jphone
    Member

    Uncommon jewish male name: sara.

    Heard from a mohel who made a bris for a not yet religious family and was informed that the baby would named moshe sara, “after grandpa”.

    #740856

    yacr85
    Participant

    In Israel, I hear the name Nimrod regularly (It’s on all the ads in the street for Facebook). It’s so amazing because imagine in 50 years a guy naming their kid Adolf or Saddam, after very famous, powerful people! Scary?

    #740857

    A600KiloBear
    Participant

    BS”D

    Saddam is common – among balestinians.

    #740858

    MYM
    Member

    A friend of mine has a son-in-law named Nimrod. He’s Israeli (or course), in his 40s, Persian on his mother’s side and Romanian on his father’s, and he has two little children: Talia Victoria and Jayden Shlomo. Jayden Shlomo may be the single most unfortunate name I have ever heard. Don’t want to step on anyone’s toes, but what a combination! Nimrod dates back to the early days of the state of Israel, when certain segments of the population were rejecting names like Moshe and Dovid and Shlomo as being literally too ghetto and were using pre-Abrahamic names and names of the less exemplary biblical characters. Now of course Israelis often use short names derived from common nouns, often nature-related, like Gil and Gal and Tal.

    #740859

    bein_hasdorim
    Participant

    Gamliel

    even though there is a famous rov & mekubal in EY,

    it still is very uncommon.

    then there is Odam,

    Sheim Chom, Yofes, Enosh, Cain, Hevel, Lemech,

    Zurich, Gimpel, Zlateh,

    Eisav, Elifaz, Lavan, Besuel, Oig, Golias,

    Women, there’s

    Zeresh, Vashti, Machsheifa, and……..Shviger

    a combination of Shvi as in “to sit” Gur as in “to live”

    Cuz she bazetzes herself wherever she wants, as if she owns the place.

    Then, she marks her territory and you could forget about her leaving,

    If anybody is leaving, it’s you!

    #740860

    oomis
    Participant

    “Doba ” probably derives from Tova

    Nimrod – it’s weird how calling someone a nimrod is really an insult in the English vernacular. Like calling him a jerk. Maybe that’s because the original Nimrod was really stupid to think he could build a high tower in order to go to war with Hashem.

    #740861

    pookie
    Member

    pookie

    #740862

    MYM
    Member

    The current slang meaning of ‘nimrod’ as a jerk or fool comes from a Bugs Bunny cartoon. Bugs was mocking Elmer Fudd who was out hunting with a gun as “poor little nimrod.” So basically a nimrod in today’s parlance is an Elmer Fudd kind of shnook. I personally would be in no hurry to name a child Nimrod.

    #740863

    A600KiloBear
    Participant

    BS”D

    Thanks – Doba from Tova makes sense.

    Onan would be a very uncommon name.

    #740864

    outoftowner
    Member

    Vichna

    Yachet

    kreintcha

    Shila (not an english name)

    Yekusiel

    Hodaya

    Avshalom (no, his father wasn’t ignorant- He had a cheshbon)

    ( I know one of each)

    #740865

    oomis
    Participant

    Could Shila, if it is a boy’s name, be like Shayaleh?

    we can’t have a Lemechel, and certainly not an Onan nowadays. I still am working on why people don’t like to call someone a Chaim Yankel, which seem like perfectly nice names to me. And to me the name of a distant female relative “Boitzeh” is still the number one that I have never heard again.

    #740866

    A600KiloBear
    Participant

    BS”D

    Shayaleh is from Yeshayahu. (I do know of a boy named Shygetz Aross and called Shaya from the shin yud of shaygetz and the alef of aross).

    Chaim Yankel is used in the Chassidishe oilam.

    #740867

    hello99
    Participant

    Shprintza means spring in Yiddish and would be equivalent to Aviva in Hebrew.

    Nimrod was often used to indicate rebellion againt the British Mandate.

    #740868

    aidle maidle
    Participant

    Boy:

    Eliyokum

    Girl:

    Machla

    Rashi- (although im hearing more often).

    Someone i know of is called Zilpoh- as in the name of rachel (or was it leah??) imeinu’s maid.

    #740869

    A600KiloBear
    Participant

    Shprintza means spring in Yiddish and would be equivalent to Aviva in Hebrew.

    BS”D

    Nope. It comes from Spanish, from Esperanza, meaning hope, and it is Tikvah in Hebrew.

    #740870

    A600KiloBear
    Participant

    BS”D

    Moshiach, common among Persians, Bukharans and Georgians, is probably not used anymore in this generation; kind of embarrassing.

    In my old shul in Moscow we had a Bukharan jeweler whose name was Moshiach and his father’s name was Dovid! Heads would turn when he was called up for an aliya, to put it mildly, because we were expecting his brother Mordechai to come and daven musaf….

    #740871

    Phyllis
    Member

    Most uncommon girls name: Elana, Osnat, Ada

    #740872

    anon for this
    Participant

    There’s a well-known Israeli biblical scholar named Avashalom Kor.

    Perhaps the boy’s name Shilah is a derivative of Shaila (Yehudah’s third son, so not unfortunate as Onan) or Shiloh.

    #740873

    hello99
    Participant

    Sorry KBear, but any Yiddish speaker will tell you that Shprintza is the Yiddish word for the season Spring.

    #740874

    NY Mom
    Member

    Phyllis: I don’t think Elana is uncommon. Less common than Rivky – yes, but I wouldn’t say “uncommon”, as I have known several girls/women over the years with that name.

    One uncommon girl’s name: Yiska.

    This was another name for Sara Imeinu.

    I only know one girl with that name.

    #740875

    anon for this
    Participant

    NY Mom, I know a little girl named Yiskah. Of course Jessica used to be a very popular name, though less so now.

    #740876

    A600KiloBear
    Participant

    Sorry KBear, but any Yiddish speaker will tell you that Shprintza is the Yiddish word for the season Spring.

    BS”D

    Do you mean shprinzin for spring? It is not the source of Shprintza though, like the similarity of Frimet (forgot the source) to the word frum, it could account for the popularity of that name in Eastern Europe, where winters are long, cold and dark.

    #740877

    A600KiloBear
    Participant

    BS”D

    In any case I think friling is more common for spring in Yiddish. I can double check with a native Yiddish speaker at shacharis tomorrow; I am trying to remember songs by YTEhrlich that mention spring and friling comes to mind.

    #740878

    Jothar
    Member

    Apologies for the pedantics, but the name is “Elyakim”, Hashem will establish, not Elyakum, Hashem will stand up.

    #740879

    haifagirl
    Participant

    Phyllis: Osnat is not that uncommon in EY.

    hello: I’m with bear on this one. I don’t speak Yiddish, but fruehling is German for spring. So his explanation makes sense.

    #740880

    A600KiloBear
    Participant

    BS”D

    Jothar, you are right, but I know an Elyokum and as he is a BT I questioned whether he had his name right. He insisted it was his grandfather’s name, spelled with a vov. However, I think it still is erroneous and that his family may not have been too learned, or, more likely, his ggf might already have left Yiddishkeit and hardly knew or cared whether his son’s shem beYisroel was correctly spelled.

    #740881

    A600KiloBear
    Participant

    BS”D

    And then there was the Creedmoorer who registered seven names for his boy so he could get seven WIC cheques. The names were:

    Eliezer

    Eliyahu

    Elimelech

    Elishama

    Elifelet

    Elitzur

    Elisha

    And what did they call him at home? Elisheva!

    #740882

    NY Mom
    Member

    anon for this: NY Mom, I know a little girl named Yiskah. Of course Jessica used to be a very popular name, though less so now.

    Interesting. It never occurred to me that Jessica came from the name Yiska. As far as I knew, the male name Jessie is the English translation of Yishai (As in Dovid ben…), and I just thought Jessica was the female version of that.

    #740883

    NY Mom
    Member

    anon: Dictionary.com says we are both correct 🙂

    “Jes?si?ca [jes-i-kuh]

    noun

    a female given name, form of Jesse.”

    “Word Origin & History

    Jessica

    fem. proper name, from L.L. Jesca, from Gk. Ieskha, from Heb. Yiskah, name of a daughter of Haran [Gen. xi.29].”

    #740884

    anon for this
    Participant

    NY Mom, I didn’t realize that either until I was in high school, but it’s definitely true. Jesse is indeed Yishai though. I also didn’t know that the name Jemima is from nach.

    #740885

    shtusim
    Participant

    i know a non frum Israeli who had twins. using a “hebrew” book of names, he picked names from the “twins” section. His two boys are named “ELDAD & MEIDAD”. NOT JOKING.

    Girls names

    Yospeh

    Boys names

    Chalavna

    #740886

    Jothar
    Member

    Meidad- Meidad Tasa has that name. Good voice.

    The Elyakim in Tanach was renamed Yehoyakim by the Egyptian Pharoah, if I recall correctly. Not a tzadik, but a good name. Same with Yehudis, the popular Jewish-sounding name, originally of the wife of Eisav!

    I once read that Nimrod became popular due to the “Canaanite” movement of the early secular Zionists. Anat is also the name of a Canaanite Avodah Zarah.

Viewing 50 posts - 51 through 100 (of 253 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.