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  • #1125267

    AbeF
    Participant

    Nice! AS usual…. Your Good Pick! Thank you so much BaalHabooze!!!

    #1125268

    BaalHabooze
    Participant

    You’re so welcome, AbeF!!

    Sometimes I wonder if anyone ends up reading these, so thank you to all who post and respond on this thread! Next up:

    Parshas Tetzaveh, Parshas Zochor, and……………Purim!!!

    #1125269

    BaalHabooze
    Participant

    ?’ ???


    I heard a nice pshat yesterday, on 7 Adar, regarding Moshe Rabbeinu’s yartzeit. We know Haman was thrilled that his pur ,his lottery, that he cast, fell out in the month of Adar, because that was the month Moshe, the great Manhig of Klal Yisroel, was niftar. What he DIDN’T know is that Moshe was also BORN in Adar.

    The question one must ask is, so what if he was born on that day, l’mayseh he died on that day? Rather the idea here is as follows. When a baby is born he comes into this world with clentched fists, symbolizing ‘ME’, everything belongs to ME, I’m only concerned about ME. And he lives his life with the Avodah of opening those hands and working on changing the ‘Ich’ to ‘Zich’, striving to becoming a selfless person. The last thing the chevra kadisha does to a meis is open up his hands, so that he shouldn’t leave the world with closed hands as he came into the world when he was born.

    Moshe Rabbeinu was born to be an Eved Hashem and lived his whole life that way, and he still is omeid u’meshamesh l’maaloh. So therefore there’s no difference between the leidah and the petirah, because by moshe it’s not pshat his Avdus was bottul when he was niftar. Aderabbeh, his life was one long Avdus, and now that he went to the upper worlds, it’s just a hemshich and continuation of that Avdus. That’s what Haman didn’t realize, and as they say, the rest is history.

    l’chaim!

    #1125270

    BaalHabooze
    Participant

    PURIM

    —-

    #1125271

    BaalHabooze
    Participant

    One more on Purim, I’m typing real fast because I’m in a hurry so excuse any spelling mistakes.

    Because purim is about getting in touch with our real essence. We are the neshama of hashem. So we cover the outside to bring out the inside.

    Our job on purim is to look beneath the surface, and 1) see how directly involved Hashem is in our own personal lives, and 2) to get in touch with ourselves: our pure desire to do the will of hashem. With this we will be able to feel the inner beauty of mitzvos, just like the yidden felt in times of Mordechai.

    L’chaim yidden. l’chaim!!! A good shabbos and a freilichin & listigin purim to all.

    #1125272

    sam4321
    Participant

    Mesheches Megillah on daf 16a Tosfos (see the Hagoas HaBach 5)says he heard that the 10,000 kikarim of kesef haman offered equals the amount of all the chatzai shekalim of the 600,000 Jews of the midbar.Now how to figure it out.How much is a one kikar? One kikar = 60 maneh.60*10,000 = 600,000.One Maneh = 25 shekalim.so 600,000*25 = 15,000,000 ,How many Half Shekalim were there? 15,000,000*2= 30,000,000. The age of giving machatzis Hashekel is from the age of 20 to 70(years of a lifetime).600,000 people times 50 years = 30,000,000. The half shekalim which were given years before had the power to knock off the same amount of the evil haman years later.

    #1125274

    BaalHabooze
    Participant

    Vayakhel


    Rabbi Eliyahu Hoffmann

    (from torah.org)

    The Jewish Mother – A Hair-Raising Responsibility

    The construction of the Mishkan (Tabernacle) was performed by the most skilled and wisest of men. However the women also had a role in its construction. “All the women whose hearts inspired them with wisdom spun the goat’s-hair. (35:26)” While no doubt the spinning of the goat’s- hair was a critical element of the Mishkan, why does the Torah imply that it required some special measure of wisdom? Skill and dexterity perhaps – but wisdom?

    Rashi explains that an extraordinary level of craftsmanship was required to spin the goat’s-hair, because the women would spin their threads from the fleece on the backs of the goats before it was shorn – i.e. straight off the goat! Sforno explains that after fleece is shorn, the hair loses more of its lustre each time it is handled. By combing and spinning the fleece straight off the goats while it was still growing, they were able to preserve much of the lustre that would have otherwise been lost.

    This explains the extra level of wisdom required in spinning the goat’s- hair, but it still doesn’t adequately resolve why this special craft could only be performed by women. Aside from this one anomaly, all other aspects of the Mishkan’s construction were performed by men. Surely there were men who were equally capable of performing the “extraordinary craft” of spinning the hair. Not that we begrudge the women their part in the building of the Tabernacle; it’s just that if the Torah dictates that one specific aspect of its construction was performed exclusively by women, there must be something more to it than just practical considerations.

    The great and wise Shlomo Ha-melech (King Solomon) advises: “Listen, my child, to the rebuke of your father; and do not forsake the Torah of your mother. (Mishlei/Proverbs 1:8)” We all know the scenario: Father comes home from a long day at work; mother is standing by the door to greet him. The look on her face tells him he hasn’t come one moment too soon. Before even removing his galoshes, he’s already been briefed; little Shmueli has been sent to his room for fighting with his sister, and awaits father’s homecoming – in order to receive the thrashing with which he’s been threatened. Thus it comes as no surprise that the prophet associates “rebuke” with the father. But why does he connect Torah to the mother? Isn’t it the father’s mitzvah to teach his son Torah?

    Mefarshim (commentators) explain that while it is indeed the father’s role to educate his child in the study of Torah and its laws and ordinances, it is the mother who creates the atmosphere that permeates the very walls of the Jewish home. It is her duty to see to it that the atmosphere be one of Torah, kedushah, and shalom – an environment which encourages love of Torah and dedication to mitzvos.

    In many families, the father spends the majority of his time away from home; it is the mother who ultimately bears the burden of ensuring that her children, who spend far more time with her, constantly experience a life brimming with the love for Torah and mitzvos that they will later be taught by their fathers and teachers. Observing the attitudes and reactions of a parent to the daily hustle and bustle of a Jewish home is a far more powerful and influential source of education than any lesson learned from a book, and it is this “Torah of your mother” to which King Shlomo refers.

    A Russian oleh (immigrant) to Israel approached a Beis-Din (Jewish court) with concern: He knew that his mother was Jewish, but he had no recollection of ever being told whether he was a Kohen, a Levi, or a Yisrael. His nondescript family name gave no clue as to his tribal origin.

    Perhaps, asked the Beis Din, he had some memories of his childhood in Russia which would offer a glimpse into his lineage? He remembered very little; but – yes – there was one thing that stood out in his mind. On the eve of every Yom Tov, his mother would take the children to a local dry-goods store to buy a brand new pair of socks for their father. He still remembered the special look on his mother’s face when she would buy the socks; it almost glowed. Later, they would go home, and wrap up the socks, and wait for his father to come home. When he did, they would all gather around, and his mother would excitedly present him with his new socks. “I never understood why she always chose to buy him socks – you would have thought she might have bought socks one Yom Tov, a shirt for the next, and maybe pants or shoes after that. We never questioned her, though; she always bought socks, and the glow on her face was always the same. I remember it as if it were just yesterday.”

    Without hesitation, the Beis Din ruled that the man was a Kohen. While in Israel the Kohanim offer the priestly blessings (Birkas Kohanim) daily, in the Diaspora they do so only on the Yamim Tovim. One of the requirements of Birkas Kohanim is that the Kohen take off his shoes while he blesses the congregation. No doubt, Beis Din reasoned, his mother wanted to make sure that this special mitzvah was performed in a special way, so she made sure that each Yom Tov her husband, a Kohen, should have new socks to wear as he stood and blessed the congregation.

    How remarkable. The man, it seems, had no memory of his father performing the priestly blessings, although he surely must have accompanied him to shul. But he vividly remembered the anticipation of his mother as she went out of her way on a busy Erev Yom Tov to honour a mitzvah in her own special way.

    Perhaps this is why the women were charged with the craft of spinning the fleece directly off the backs of the goats. All other aspects of the Mishkan’s construction involved taking raw materials – gold, silver, copper, wool, etc. – and using them as the building blocks for the Tabernacle and its holy vessels. The men were given these tasks, just as it is their responsibility to take a child – the raw material – and make him holy by educating him in the laws and lessons of the Torah.

    The spinning of the goat’s-hair was the only task that required the materials to be formed, moulded and infused with holiness at their very source – straight off the backs of the goats. The mother of the house is referred to in the Holy Tongue as the “Akeres Ha-bayis – the source of the household,” for it is she who brings a aura of kedusha, love for Torah, and respect for mitzvos into the very foundation of the Jewish home. Only the women could take responsibility for such an essential and critical task, which, when performed with wisdom, preserves the lustre of the Jewish soul.

    #1125275

    BaalHabooze
    Participant

    Parsha Potpourri: Parshas Vayikra (2012)

    Sefer Bereishis discusses the creation of the universe and the formation of the Jewish people. The book of Shemos continues to recount their national development, detailing the Exodus from Egypt and the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai. Whereas these first two books of the Torah consist of a logical and straightforward historical narrative, Sefer Vayikra seems to be comprised of a number of disparate topics which at first glance appear to lack a unifying theme. What could be the common thread connecting portions which discuss the laws of offering sacrifices, the various types of ritual impurities, the Yom Kippur service, the laws governing Kohanim, and the Yomim Tovim?

    #1125276

    BaalHabooze
    Participant

    Tzav

    —-

    heard by Rabbi Frand

    Double Entendre In the Word “Hoda’ah”

    Among the sacrifices mentioned in this week’s parsha is the Thanksgiving Offering. The Medrash says that in the future, all the sacrifices will be nullified, except the Thanksgiving Offering — for there is always need to give thanks.

    Rav Yitzchok Hutner z”tl, makes a very interesting point. “Todah” [thanks] comes from the word “Hoda’ah”, meaning giving thanks. However, the word “Hoda’ah” also means to admit (as in the expression Hoda’as ba’al din k’meah edim dami [An admission of a litigant is like one hundred witnesses]).

    Rav Hutner says that it is no coincidence that the word for thanking and the word for admitting are one and the same. In order for a person to give thanks, he must be able to admit that he needed help. The first step in being grateful to someone for doing something for you is the admission that you needed help and that you are not all powerful. Therefore, the Hebrew word for thanks and for admission are the same.

    How do we know whether the word “Hoda’ah” means admission or thanks? Rav Hutner says that we need to look at the preposition that comes after the word. The word “Hoda’ah” — meaning admission — is always followed by the Hebrew preposition ‘”sheh…” (that). The word “Hoda’ah” — meaning thanks — is always followed by the Hebrew word “al …” (for).

    We daven [pray] a Blessing of Modim in Shmoneh Esrei, called the Blessing of “Hoda’ah”. How does it read? “Modim anachnu lach sheh…” This indicates, that the first thing we must do is not thank G-d, but admit to G-d that we are dependent on Him. Once we come to that understanding, then we can come to the end of the blessing where we say “Nodeh lecha… …al…” — We thank You for… Birkas HaHoda’ah is thus a two-stage blessing. It is a Hoda’ah of admission at the beginning which climaxes with a Hoda’ah of thanking at the end.

    We Can’t Appoint an Agent to Say ‘Thank-You’

    I recently saw a beautiful insight in the Avudraham. When the Chazan says Modim, the congregation recites a prayer known as “The Rabbis’ Modim”. Why is that? The Avudraham says that for all blessings in the Shmoneh Esrei, we can have an agent. For ‘Heal Us’, for ‘Bless Us with a Good Year’, and so forth we can have a messenger — the Shliach Tzibbur [the agent of the congregation (chazzan)] can say the blessing for us. However, there is one thing that no else one can say for us. We must say it for ourselves. That one thing is “Thank You”. Hoda’ah must come from ourselves. No one can be our agent to say ‘Thank You’.

    #1125277

    BaalHabooze
    Participant

    TAZRIA

    —-

    Why is a bris on the eighth day?

    It says in the Chasam Sofer that he once observed a doctor with nurses tending to a patient who was bleeding profusely. No matter how much they tried to stop it from bleeding, it wouldn’t stop. Then the doctor sent out all the nurses, and he was able to stop the bleeding quite rapidly, with ease, all by himself. The Chasam Sofer asked him how he did that? The doctor responded that he speculated that perhaps one of the nurses had their time of the month and so when he sent them out he was able to control the situation with his patient. The Chasam Sofer was blown away and asked for an explanation. The doctor said that Dam is moshech (draws) other blood. so as long as this nurse, whichever it was, with her cycle, was present, it would be impossible to stop the patient’s bleeding, so he had them leave the room.

    After this incident, the Chasam Sofer said that this can perhaps be an explantion in why a bris mila is on the eighth day after birth. Because the mother must keep 7 impure days min hatorah after giving birth to a boy. After 7 days, there is no more Dam, so she can be toivel, and she’s tohor. On the eighth day you can do the bris because there is no more sakana to the baby, since there’s no more Dam Nidah from the mother.

    #1125278

    WIY
    Member

    Parshas Mitzora: from Revach.net

    Rav Moshe Feinstein – Because We Don’t Know As Much As We Think

    “V’tziva HaKohen V’Lakach LaMitaher; The Kohen commands the one who is becoming Tahor.” (Mitzora 14:4) Rav Moshe Feinstein says that it seems from here that the Mitaher must be commanded each step of the process by the Kohen. “Where do we find such a thing,” asks Rav Moshe, “where the Torah specifically includes in the process that the person be told by someone else to do something?”

    Rav Moshe answers that there are certain mitzvos whose exact details are perceived by people to be outside the realm of dictated halacha and are left to a person’s logical discretion. In those cases, the person acts on his own feelings and not the dictates of the Torah. For example, when giving tzedaka people feel it is their right to use their own judgement, even though there are halachos as to where your tzedaka should go. Similarly, parenting is something that people do without consulting halacha and use their own “good sense”.

    One of the reasons for Tzoraas is not lending your possessions to others. This is because a person feels that lending is at his own discretion. As part of his tikun, the Torah teaches him that he cannot make a single move that is not firmly rooted in halacha. Therefore, when going through the tahara process, he has a Kohen alongside of him guiding him on his every move.

    #1125279

    tzaddiq
    Member

    his thread has been stale for too long.

    anyone?

    #1125280

    Shopping613 🌠
    Participant

    I only read the first post…dont the mods kerp such a project going? It looked like 72 was in charge…what happened?

    #1125281

    WIY
    Member

    tzaddik

    Parshas Shlach: Rokeach – What Is The Connection Between The Mikoshesh Eitzim and Tzitzis?

    The Rokeach answers with a Tanna D’bei Eliyahu that says, Hashem asked Moshe, “Why was the Mikoshsesh Michalel Shabbos?” Moshe didn’t know. Hashem said, “I will answer for you. Six days a week a person wears Tefilin on his hand and head. When he sees them, he refrains from doing aveiros. However, on Shabbos there is no Tefilin to remind him.” At that point Hashem told Moshe to go out and command the Bnei Yisroel to wear Tzitzis. The pasuk says, “You will see them and remember all the mitzvos of Hashem.”

    from revach.net

    #1125282

    WIY
    Member

    Parshas Korach: Chasam Sofer – Dasan or Aviram’s Debt of Gratitude To Moshe

    “Vlo Harai’osi Es Achad Mayhem”, neither have I wronged one of them (Korach 16:15). The words Es Achad Mayhem, “one of them” seems extra. He could have simply said , “Vlo Hariosi Lahem” – “I did not wrong them”?

    The Chasam Sofer answers, when Moshe visited his brothers in the fields of Mitzrayim, he noticed 2 Jews, Dasan and Aviram , fighting amongst themselves. When one lifted a hand against the other, he exclaimed, “Rasha, why do you strike your brother?” Moshe broke up the fight this sparing the other a beating.

    When Korach came to argue with Moshe, he was joined by the infamous rebels, Dasan and Aviram. Moshe was shocked to see them and said in amazement, “the one I stopped from beating up his friend may have reason to be angry with me , but “Vlo Hariosi Es Achad Mayhem” – to one of them I did no evil – in fact I rescued him – why does he join my enemies?

    from revach.net

    #1125283

    WIY
    Member

    Parshas Korach: Rav Chaim Shmuelevitz – The Low Threshold Of Genius

    Oin ben Peles was part of Korach’s group. The gemara Sanhedrin (109b) says that Oin was saved, thanks to his wife’s “Chochma”. What was her great “Chochma” that the gemara refers too? That she told her husband that it makes no difference to him who leads the people, so why get involved? Does that take such a big genius?

    Rav Chaim Shmuelevitz answers that during a Machlokes when people are all emotionally entangled, no one speaks with a great deal of intelligence. Merely speaking logically and rationally during these times qualifies your words as Chochma. (Derech Sicha)

    from Revach.net

    #1125287

    WIY
    Member

    Parshas Korach: Rav Elyashiv – Korach Connects With The Masses

    The Medrash tells us that there were three Nevi’im in the time leading up to the Churban HaBayis, Yirmiya who spoke in the marketplace, Tzefania who spoke in Shuls, and Chulda who spoke to the women.

    Why did they need three Nevi’im? Rav Elyashiv explains that if they would have invited everyone to come hear the nevuah they’d be standing there without an audience. The Nevi’im needed to go out to the people and each one had their own target venue.

    “Yet, on the other hand,” points out Rav Elyashiv, “when Korach spoke, ‘Yayakhel Aleihem Korach Es Kol HaEidah; Korach snapped his fingers and they all came running: men women, and children.”

    The sad testament here is that when it comes to hearing the Dvar Hashem no one will come. The message needs to be taken to the people, each one with their own twist. Yet, when it comes to bashing Torah, one size fits all, and the crowds you can amass without going anywhere are standing room only.

    From Revach.net

    #1125288

    WIY
    Member

    Parshas Korach: Vilna Gaon – A Good Machlokes Doesn’t Disappears

    The Mishna in Pirkei Avos (5:17) says that a machlokes like Hillel and Shammai that is L’Shem Shamayim is Sofo Lihiskayem and will last, while a machlokes that is not L’Shem Shamayim like Korach, Ein Sofo Lihiskayem, will not last. Shouldn’t a machlokes L’Shem Shamayim eventually resolve itself, while one based on ulterior motives should carry on indefinitely?

    The Vilna Gaon explains that a machlokes rooted in hidden agendas and ulterior motives will change like a chameleon. As the argument carries on, it will grow and spread and no one will remember how or why it started. Whatever ignited it was not substantial, but only opportunistic and insignificant. Other times, a machlokes becomes personal and takes on a life of its own and people forget why they started fighting in the first place, so the original machlokes is not Miskayem.

    However, if a machlokes is L’Shem Shamayim, there is nothing hidden and nothing personal. The only point of contention is and will always remain the disputed issue and will continue to be fought with clarity and integrity.

    From Revach.net

    #1125289

    tzaddiq
    Member

    baalhabooze, you got anymore nice ones?

    #1125290

    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    This thread has not been updated for awhile so I decided to put in a Dvar Torah

    The Seforim HaKedoshim tell us that the we have 248 limbs which draw life from Krias Shema which has 248 words in it. However, if you count up the words in the three parshiyos of Shema you will find only 247 words. Where is the 248th word? The answer is, the word “Emes” that we say after Ani Hashem Elokeichem.

    The Degel Machenei Ephraim says we find a Remez for this in the Pasuk (VaEschanan 4:4), “V’Atem HaDveikim B’Hashem Elokeichem Chaim Kulchem HaYom; And you who attach yourself to Hashem are all living today.” The word Atem is the same letters as Emes . If you attach it at the end of Shema to Hashem Elokeichem, then Chaim Kulchem HaYom, all 248 of your limbs will be alive with the Shefa infused by the holy words of Shema.

    from revach.net

    #1125291

    pixelate
    Member

    Wow, very nice!

    Who is the Degel Machaneh Ephrayim?

    #1125292

    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    According To wikipedia, he was R’ Moshe Chaim Ephraim of Sulikov (wherever that is) and was the Baal Shem Tov’s grandson

    #1125293

    WIY
    Member

    Yeshivaguy

    Moshe Chaim Ephraim of Sudilkov, which was in Ukraine.

    #1125294

    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    WIY Thanks.

    Here’s this week’s dvar Torah

    This also explains the Gemara that says the importance of the minim are based on their positioning in the pasuk. You are required to make a bracha first on the minim closer to the word Eretz since they are more important.

    from revach.net

    #1125295

    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    from torah.org

    #1125296

    yeshivaguy45
    Participant

    This has not been updated since the last time I updated it which was a month and a half ago.

    Here’s a Dvar Torah for Succos.I saw this several years ago and I found it very inspiring. It’s from Rabbi Shmuel Brazil.

    Let us take this interpretation a step further. Rashi brings the Chazal that bakol is gematria ben 52 referring to the fact that Hashem blessed Avraham with a son. So we now see a further connection between the mitzvah of succah and the beracha of having a son, specifically Yitzchak. What is this new connection?

    the month of Tishrei those clouds returned to Am Yisrael. This is the reason why Succos is in Tishrei.

    According to the Gaon, Succos represents the Yom Tov that displayed that our teshuva was accepted. The Bnei Yissaschar writes that true teshuva only applies to Yidden and not to the goyim. The reason being because there is a halacha that states that a father can forgive [be mochail]

    From matzav.com (you can go there and type in the search engine sukkos brazil for the full article)

    #1125297

    BaalHabooze
    Participant

    Parshas Noach


    VaYacheil Noach Ish Hoadamah

    After going through the serious avodah of an Elul, an inspiring Rosh Hashana, a heilig Yom Kippur, and a joyful Sukkos and simchas torah, we tend to come out with a refreshing feeling and a “high” from the kedusha we just experienced. However, as things tend to run, and as life continues in all its harsh realities, unfortunately those feelinsg don’t stay around as long nor as easily as we would like.

    ‘Vayacheil Noach’, when parshas Noach comes, ‘Ish Hoadamah’, unfortunately we get caught up once again with our work/careers/earthly pursuits.

    Let’s try to hold on to those wonderful moments as long as we can to be who we were meant to become.

    B’hatzlachah!

    #1125299

    BaalHabooze
    Participant

    Parshas Beshalach


    My rav said this week in the name of the Kli Yakor an explanation why Mon was called Mon. One explanation is that it was a heavenly-sent food that was really only sensed by one’s nose by the fragrance that came forth. The letters of Mon is spelled with a ‘mem’ and a ‘nun’. These are the only letters in the alef-beis that cannot be pronounced when you hold your nose. You need THE NOSE to properly say the name of this food because that was the only physical body part that was needed to sense it. (I know, I know, I tried it and it doesn’t work….oh, well!)

    Secondly, mem and nun are the only letters that are spelled with its letter. mem is spelled mem mem, and nun is nun nun. This was to highlight the nes of receiving the double portion every erev shabbos.

    Finally, the Sfas Emes says that the Mon brought a tremendous amount of emunah, and sense of trust in Hashem, the One and Only Provider of the world and for Klal Yisroel in the wilderness. The words “Mon Hu” are the same letters as the word “Emunah”.

    A good shabbos all!

    #1125300

    BaalHabooze
    Participant

    Parshas Yisro


    We could speculate and suggest that this, the torah, and indeed all of yiddishkeit, is about forming a relationship. The 10 Dibros, in one way, is THE secret that teaches us the principles and fundamentals for people forming a bond with each other, and people connecting with the Master of the Universe. How is this done? How do we approach Hashem, relate to Him, dare we say, come CLOSE to Him?

    Well, there are 2 sides of the Aseres Hadibros. Five and Five. We are taught that each commandment on one tablet is keneged a commandment on the other tablet. 1-6, 2-7, 3-8, 4-9, and 5-10. The first five are mitzvos that are Bein Odom LaMokom, and the second five are mitzvos Bein Odom LaChaveiroy. So with this idea, we can suggest that we were presented at Har Sinai five fundamental principles of a relationship. Five rules, 10 commandments. Because one cannot form a relationship with the Creator of the World without knowing the basic rules of having a relationship with another human being.

    Rule #2 – Loyalty- Irreplaceable:

    So with all this, we can now use the Aseres Hadibros to unlock the secret to form a solid relationship for both man and man, and man and G-d, which is the ultimate purpose of Torah and Judaism. As such it certainly deserved and warranted a spectacular event in order to instill in us a recognition of the seriousness, goodness and preciousness of G-d and His Torah.

    #1125301

    BaalHabooze
    Participant

    I was at a sheva brochos couple years ago on parshas Terumah, when a guy got up to speak l’kovod the simcha. I don’t remember his whole speech but it was about the newly wed couple embarking on their life journey to build a ‘mishkan me’at’, yada yada yada. His ending was classic though:

    “…so we learn about the mishkan we made for Hashem. Since a marriage is also about building a new bayis, it therefore pays to study the bais Hashem to see what we can learn. And, raboysai, we see the top three most important things for building a bayis, and I quote the posuk….’zahav, kessef, u’nechoshes’

    May Hashem bless your bayis to be like the mikdash- everything donated.”

    #1125303

    BaalHabooze
    Participant

    Anyone want to volunteer a dvar torah?

    Maybe posters can take on a day of the week to post one, like in the old days…

    In can be a dvar torah on this week’s parsha, or parshas shekolim, Adar, Purim, or on anything topic! Would be nice to get this thread bursting with torah once again

    #1125304

    zappy
    Member

    i would like to post every day a q and a with rav avigdor miller zt”l do the mods approve of this idea? and if they do this is the first one:Q why did hashem create sleep if its a waste of time!A:hashem made this world for the purpose of recognizing him.how would we recognize him if your busy with your own affairs, so he makes you need to eat so you ask hashem for food and you thank him so hashem makes you tired so you cry out to him: make me fall asleep! you say shema your thanking hashem for your day and the ability to asleep!

    #1125305

    zappy
    Member

    ballhabooze we could do this together every other night one of us posts

    #1125306

    BaalHabooze
    Participant

    Hey Zappy,

    I just started a new job and I’m VERY busy these days. Perhaps when things calm down, I will then contribute divrei torah, gladly. But for now, I’ve become a glancer rather than a poster because of my hectic schedule.

    I nevertheless encourage you and others to post a dvar torah, and wish you much hatzlachah in your endeavor.

    L’Chaim!

    #1125307

    zappy
    Member

    thanks ballhabooze and haztlacha to you

    #1125308

    zappy
    Member

    Q:how does one alleviate stress ? A:sleep 8 hours a night with no exception! no simchas of my friend friends uncle! use your sleep time preciously.

    #1125309

    zappy
    Member

    Q:should a yeshiva bochur learn niflaos habore? A:let him learn chovos halavavos or shar habichena and he will surley know he must learn niflaos habore.

    #1125310

    zappy
    Member

    Q:what comes first davening mincha or helping your mother? A:your mother comes first.

    #1125311

    zappy
    Member

    Q: what is the torah attitude towards vegetarians. A:Its common sense that if he believes in it as principal than he is lacking emmunah the torah says openly its permitted to eat meat ,basar vachalev.

    #1125312

    zappy
    Member

    RABBI LABEL LAM So even if we were all sages it still be a Mitzvah for us to tell about the exodus from Egypt and the more one increases in telling the story of the exodus from Egypt the more he is praiseworthy. (Haggadah)

    In each and every generation a person is obligated to see himself as if he went out of Egypt. (Haggadah)

    If that is the thanks due to one who carried us a few miles, what is owed to One Who has carried and fed us an entire a lifetime. When we consider the many miles of kindliness that have followed us and our people through the rough terrain of our history, our hearts should be overflowing with endless gratitude.

    The Pesach Seder is not just a place to download cold bytes of information through the ages. The more we tell the story year after year and feel it real for ourselves the more praiseworthy we become, and no one is too sophisticated to have outgrown the obligation of profound appreciation

    #1125315

    zappy
    Member

    Q:the mesillas yeshorim says the purpose of life is to withstand nisoyons.How can one fortify himself for the trial of being tested? A:learning the mesillas yeshorim is a very good way to strengthen your character and good sechal for the nisoyons

    #1125316

    zappy
    Member

    Q:is there an age when one should stop having children? A:yes,when they die. the chofetz chaim’s first wife died when he was an elderly man,he remarried and had a son.

    #1125317

    Hashemisreading
    Participant

    This is a really nice thread, I very much enjoyed going through it and reading all the divrei torah. Thank you to all the contributors.

    #1679434

    I’d like to put this back where it belongs…

    #1679452

    Neville ChaimBerlin
    Participant

    “I’d like to put this back where it belongs…”
    In Adar?

    #1679826

    Joseph
    Participant

    The 10 Commandments of Marriage of Rav Avigdor Miller

    Be realistic
    Do no disrupt the routine of marriage
    Make peace
    Never say the word “get”
    Be loyal
    Never say “I hate you”
    Love your neighbor as yourself
    Display your regard for your mate
    Maintain your appearance
    Don’t be a tyrant

    #1689186

    samthenylic
    Participant

    To CHACHAM in Post # _2309 about why we clop by Mordechai in Bobov 48, and by Medina in Satmar. In Lubavitch we don’t clop by Haman, because he will do teshuva. Mibney bonov shel Haman lomdu Torah Bibnei B’rak. Therefore, in Lubavitch they say “Yismach Yisroel B’eisov”
    A friliche Purim everybody.
    P S What do you call the period between Purim Katan and regular Purim?
    CHOL HAMOED PURIM!

    #1693214

    In Mir they clop by every Eitz.

    #1694698

    and In BMG they clop by every Gimmel

    #1798490

    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    Bereishis:

    שלוחו של אדם כמותו – Adam Harishon was suppose to die when he ate from the eitz hadaas. The fact that he was thrown out of the gaan eden was considered as he died.

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