“Acharon shel Pessach” – No other Yom Tov is called so, why is it called that?

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  • #1719233

    There is no Acharon shel sukkos, why is the last day of pessach called Acharon shel Pessach? No other yom tov has such a name?!

    #1719384

    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    We call the last day of succas Hoshanah Rabba so there is no need to call it acharon shel sukkas.

    #1719411

    Joseph
    Participant

    Succos is only seven days.

    #1719433

    Pessach also is only seven days.

    #1719758

    rational
    Participant

    Only Pesach has a yom tov on the last day, hence “acharon shel Pesach”. Neither Succos nor Shavuos has a last day that is a yom tov.

    #1719764

    akuperma
    Participant

    What else would you call it? Unlike Sukkos, the last days of Pesach are not a separate yuntuf with their own name?

    #1719763

    Joseph
    Participant

    Only in chutz l’aaretz does Pesach have eight days.

    #1719774

    Ysiegel
    Participant

    It is explained in Chassidus (and if it is, like, REALLY, extremely important to you then I’ll gladly dig up the sources, including the sources in Nigleh — i.e. Gemara, Rishonim, other classic works) , based, of course, off of various sources, that an entire inyan is included in its opening, and subsequently in its end. For instance, the beginning of the Gemara will as a rule include within it concepts that pertain to the Maseches as a whole, and its ending can be traced back to it as well, as a sort of “stamp and closure”.

    Well, Acharon Shel Pesach isn’t just its own holiday. You see, this is in contrast to, for example, Shemini Atzeres, about which the commentaries (Rashi…) explain, that it is like a King whose son must go away after being with his father for a week. So the King asks him to remain for just one more day; Shemini Atzeres has its own inyan, its own vorts, and so forth. Acharon Shel Pesach signifies the culmination of the entire Chag; that is why in many sources it is related to as a holiday of Geula, of our future redemption. Since the first part of the Chag, Leil Haseder was mostly focused on our redemption from the Land of Egypt, and the continual redemption even today (bekol dor vador chayav adam lehar’ot et atzmo…; hashata avdin…), now this last part is more focused on the future redemption BB”A.

    That is why it is called specifically Acharon Shel Pesach, to signifiy that it is the ENDING and SUMMATION of the entire point and Chag of Pesach, that of redemption and freedom from our chains, whether physical or spiritual.

    I’ll be happy to provide sources/elaboration upon request.

    #1719996

    musser zoger
    Participant

    We dont call it a shmini shel pesach so as not to be over in basball tosif. So as not to imply the 8 days are deoraysa.

    #1719993

    anonymous Jew
    Participant

    Gee Joseph, really? 8 days? Only in chutz laaretz? Who knew??

    #1720015

    Neville ChaimBerlin
    Participant

    Is it mutar to go to a baseball tosif game on acharon shel pesach?

    #1720035

    Yabia Omer
    Participant

    Not everyone calls it that. We call it Shemini Shel Pesach

    #1720031

    rational – “Neither Succos nor Shavuos has a last day that is a yom tov.” So if I invite you for the day meal on Shavuos, you won’t ask me if the invitation is for the first day or last day of Shavuos?! You will carefully ask me if it is for the first day or second day (not c”v calling it the “last day”).

    That’s called a circular argument:

    Why is the last day of Pessach called “Acharon”, because Shavuos does not have a last day! Why does Shavuos not have a last day? Because only Pessach has a last day…classic circular logic. Not very “rational”.

    #1720185

    rational
    Participant

    Here in Israel, since both the first and the last day of Pesach is a yom tov (chag), the first day is often called “Rishon shel Pesach”, and the seventh and last day “Acharon shel Pesach”. Pesach has bookend yomim tovim, ימי מקרא קודש , first and last. Neither Shavuos nor Succos own this phenomenon. It’s quite rational.

    I hope this clarifies it for you. If it does, you can put the negativity aside, it’s quite unbecoming.

    #1720362

    Avram in MD
    Participant

    Rebbitzen Goldenpickanicerscreenname,

    “classic circular logic”

    His point was not circular. You just intentionally failed to understand it.

    #1720353

    Avram in MD
    Participant

    Rebbitzen Goldenpickanicerscreenname,

    “So if I invite you for the day meal on Shavuos, you won’t ask me if the invitation is for the first day or last day of Shavuos?! You will carefully ask me if it is for the first day or second day (not c”v calling it the “last day”).”

    I’ve never heard the second day of Shavuos called the “last” day. And neither have you – see your OP. And it would be technically incorrect to call it such.

    #1720530

    iacisrmma
    Participant

    From Rabbi Chaim Fogelman as printed in the OK’s Kosher Spirit magazine (spring 2017)

    We don’t find any other Yom Tov which has a special name denoting the last day – there’s no Acharon shel Sukkos or Acharon shel Shavuos.

    The prophet Yirmiyahu says, “Therefore, behold, days are coming, says the L-rd, when it will no longer be said, As the L-rd lives who brought Israel up from the land of Egypt.” (Yirmiyahu 16:14)

    We call the final day of Pesach “acharon” (the last) because we demonstrate our faith that this Pesach will be the last Pesach in exile. When Moshiach comes, we won’t celebrate Pesach as we do now, which is why we refer specifically to the last day as the Final Day of Pesach.

    #1720995

    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    This explanation from Rabbi Fogelman makes sense since we only keep the last day of Pesach in Ch’l being in galus.

    #1721003

    klugeryid
    Participant

    From Rabbi Chaim Fogelman as printed in the OK’s Kosher Spirit magazine (spring 2017)

    We don’t find any other Yom Tov which has a special name denoting the last day – there’s no Acharon shel Sukkos or Acharon shel Shavuos
    Really??
    Let’s go through the holidays

    Rosh Hashana
    chazal we’re quite unequivocal that though it is two days they are considered as one long day so of course there won’t be a separate name for the second day

    Yom kippur
    Only one day
    Succos?
    Take your pick
    Hoshana rabah
    Shimini atzeres / simchas Torah
    (Simchas Torah separate day in chutz laaretz but probably only named such because in e y that name exists too)

    Chanukah?
    Ever hear of ”zos Chanukah?

    Purim
    Shushan Purim

    Pesach
    Acharon Shel pesach

    Shavuos is only one day.

    No name of any other holiday is for a day that exists only in the diaspora

    More accurate to say that all ends of holidays have special names
    They are just different for each
    It’s almost like asking

    No other yom tov is called pesach so how come this one is?

    #1721004

    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    We will tell the story of Yetzias Mitzraim even more after redemption. A parable is told in the Migdal Eder haggada to explain this. A person had stomach problems. He could not digest his food well, but he did not fill badly because he was poor and only was able to afford what he was able to digest. A doctor cured him, but he did not fill any hakoras hatov since he desired now more food, but he could not afford it. When he became reach, then he realized the benefit of what the doctor did for him. Similarly, in galus we don’t appreciate fully Yetzias Mitzraim, but after the redemption we will fully appreciate it.

    #1721013

    Neville ChaimBerlin
    Participant

    Kluger:
    Shmini Atzeres is not acharon shel sukkos. It’s its entirely own holiday. However, I will admit that I’ve erroneously explained it as the last days of sukkos to my goyish employers in the past because it’s just easier to explain that way. Hosanah Rabbah is not a chag. Shushan Purim is not, by any stretch of the imagination, “the last day of Purim.”

    Pesach is the only holiday with an acharon. How is this thread still going? Why complicate something so extremely pashut?

    #1721100

    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    There is a vort from the Berdichever why Pesach is called by that name and not Chag Hamatzos as called by the Torah. We are emphasizing the miracle Hashem did to us, whereas He is emphasizing what we did for Him. לכתך אחרי במדבר בארץ וכו

    #1721348

    kluger – the question is why is the name achron shel pessach only used for pessach?

    You say EACH yom tov has a special name for the last day. You say it is like asking: “No other yom tov is called pesach so how come this one is?”

    Well, pessach is exclusively called that because “possach al botei avoseinu” – Hashem passed over the houses…so there is a direct reason/connection with the Yom Tov.

    Zos Chanukah is exclusively connected with “Zos Chanukas…” etc.

    But what is the exclusive connection between last day of pessach with name of “Acharon shel pessach”?

    #1721442

    klugeryid
    Participant

    Neville
    You lost me
    I thought the question was why is the last day of pesach the only ”last day ” that is named
    You want to know why the others have more defined names??
    Well then the question really is why doesn’t the last day of pesach have a more defined name then ”the last day ”
    To that I’d say
    Suggest something better and maybe it will stick
    But to ask why do we call it hoshana rabbah
    Why don’t we just call it last day of succos
    That’s just a stupid question not worthy of a response

    #1721493

    klugeryid
    Participant

    R golden
    It’s good pesach is over cause nobody allows mishing as much as you did there
    I can’t even untangle what you did, and you did it to my post!! Enjoy
    If you repost in a coherent fashion I’ll be glad to respond

    #1721531

    ☕ DaasYochid ☕
    Participant

    the question is why is the name achron shel pessach only used for pessach?

    Which other day should be called “Acharon shel Pesach”?

    #1721594

    balance
    Participant

    Rav Tzadok Hacohen asks this very question. He explains that in Tikunei Zohar there is a reference to the 14 days of Pesach. The first 7 being for the Pesach of Yitzias Mitzrayim, and followed by another seven days for the Next (acharon) redemption. he refers to the final one starting right after the first seven days. Hence, the Pesach Acharon starts the day after our regular Pesach = Acharon shel Pesach

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