Beit Yaakov elementaries in RBS

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  • #1689068
    assurnet
    Participant

    Looking for a quick breakdown and comparison of beit yaakovs in RBS aleph

    Mainly looking at the following:

    1) Harama
    2) Magen Avot
    3) Bnos Malka
    4) Anything else worth checking out?

    Would love to some details about chinuch/hashkafa/types of families for these schools. TIA

    #1689167
    WinnieThePooh
    Participant

    All are Torahdik schoolson the BY spectrum, but there nuances.
    2 and 3 are considered more American type, but since 2 has been around longer, you’ll also get some Israelis there who don’t want a standard BY. 2 is not actually in aleph, but in the beginning of Bet, the kids commute from Aleph. In these schools, you’ll have the kind of families who may spend the summers in America, send their kids to American-style camps, have more goodies and gadgets than your typical Israeli family, generally fathers will be working and they’ll be on a higher economic standard than average and that is reflected in their lifestyle. 3 is private, meaning you’ll have to pay some sort of tuition. A girl coming from an American BY will probably feel more comfortable in one of these schools, but will also be less likely to integrate into Israeli society since she’ll be surrounded by other English speakers.
    1 is a typical Israeli BY, with probably a more strict set of rules (e.g. tights only even outside of school, no birthday parties for classmates, etc), but being in Bet Shemesh with a large percent of chutznikim, I would say it is a bit more open-minded than say a BY in Yerushalayim. It will be a mix of kollel and working families who want to integrate into chareidi Israeli society to as much an extent as that is possible in RBSA. They do not want iphones or internet, but make exceptions for work purposes with permission from Rav. Be aware that it is the neighborhood BY for those living near it (Revivim, includes the areas up until the Ayalon park)- for those on the other side of the park (Sorek, Nachshon, Lachish, Uriya), there is BY Mishkinot Daat. That’s a slightly more yeshivish, less chutznik part of town, and that’s reflected in the BY. To the right of that, even more shtark/chareidi, is Darchei Rochel, also private,

    #1689204
    Joseph
    Participant

    Winnie, do you look at it as a chasoren that someone living in Israel would not want to integrate into Israeli society?

    #1689222
    WinnieThePooh
    Participant

    Yes, Joseph, I do feel that as hard as it is, and even though there are factors in Israeli society an American may take issue with, it is good to integrate. While not integrating can work for the older olim, it leaves their kids confused and not having an identity- they are not fully Israeli but no longer American either. The most successful and healthy families in terms of acclimation are those who accept the system for what it is, don’t fight against the things they find different from the alter heim, and don’t keep looking back over their shoulder at how good life was in America. This has been a problem in American neighborhoods in general, which are known to have many OTD kids who just never found their place. Perhaps things are a bit different nowadays, especially in a place like RBS, where maybe the oleh population has reached a critical mass so that the non-integrator can just continue living in that bubble throughout school/yeshiva and even marry within the community.

    #1689401
    Shopping613 🌠
    Participant

    I agree that not integrating is a stupid idea.
    I’m 21 and made aliyah as a teen. I know loads of people my age. From those who integrated and haven’t . Grown up here or made aliyah it doesn’t matter.
    Even if they manage to marry within their bubble most of these people who dont integrate (Id say 90%) are resentful of the system and are confused on some level.
    Whether or not you think the system is right or wrong, its the reality and being resentful of an overarching society is something you should grow out of in your teens. Not something you should be thinking of when you are 40 or 60.

    I dont think you need to lose every part about society. No one said that. You just have to work with it and live with it.

    #1689432
    Joseph
    Participant

    Large portions of chasidim don’t integrate into American society. Not being very fluent in the national language, arts, culture or secular society. And they thrive despite not integrating. Why should not integrating into Israeli society be any different. (That’s a statement, not a question.)

    #1689440
    👑RebYidd23
    Participant

    That is actually a question, and you have incorrectly marked it as a statement.

    #1689450
    WinnieThePooh
    Participant

    ujm, we’re talking about frum society, not the secular culture. It’s hard for children to thrive if they struggle speaking the language everyone else is, feel uncomfortable in shul, yeshiva, have trouble with shidduchim etc. As I said, it works if one stays within a tight communal bubble, which is what chasidish society is, the question is whether that bubble can be maintained among the olim community in E”Y, which is not as unified and all-inclusive as a chasidish community is.

    #1689520
    Shopping613 🌠
    Participant

    ujm: They have their own schools, neighborhoods, and keep to themselves.
    Also the Rabbanim aren’t for bringing more gashmiyus and shtus to Israel.

    #1690810
    assurnet
    Participant

    winniethepooh – thank you for the breakdown… exactly what I was looking for!!

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