black hats

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  • #603109
    minimod
    Member

    who started the minhag of white shirts, hats, & jackets?

    #870811
    mermaid
    Member

    Who started the minhag of men wearing pants?

    #870812
    yitayningwut
    Participant

    I want to ask a question too but I don’t have a seven letter name beginning with m and ending with d.

    #870813
    kfb
    Participant

    Back in Europe ghat is what people wore. Also look back to the 40’s 50’s and 60’s your avg man wore a hat.

    #870814
    Sam2
    Participant

    Mermaid: Good question. The Gemara says that pants (well, it says Michnasayim, which obviously, hopefully, don’t mean the pants we wear today) are Assur. (Niddah 14b or somewhere around there.)

    #870815
    147
    Participant

    Certainly not the Mishkan, where the Kohen Godol was clad in light colors, mainly sky blue, as per the pictures in the various books on the Mishkon.

    According to Kabboloh, on Shabbos one should not be wearing black which is color of Saturn god, but should have at least 4 white items of clothing.

    Come Memorial Day in another month, and we are back to the wonderful Minhog of white straw hats thru Labor Day.

    #870816
    BTGuy
    Participant

    I would imagine it was started by the guys who sold suits.

    Also, I am beginning to realize that cuff links are working their way up the minhag ladder, especially for Shabbos.

    #870817
    apushatayid
    Participant

    Skinny ties have almost reached yehareg val yaavor proportions.

    #870818
    Kind Kalman
    Participant

    Wearing white shirts always started from the Chasidim. White shirts on Shabbos were always considered a sign of extra kavod and still are so that’s why we wear them. Jackets are too were always considered a sign of kavod and still are. Hats were always a sign of kavod until Mr. John F. Kennedy came along and threw his hat off.

    #870819
    takahmamash
    Participant

    Back in Europe ghat [sic] is what people wore.

    If you look at photos of Jews back in old Europe pre-Holocaust, you will see that most of them are not wearing black hats; most are wearing gray hats.

    #870820
    esther 1995
    Member

    someone really cool started it, i think its so fetching

    #870821
    mewho
    Participant

    i like black and white.

    i like penguins.

    by the way…the nuns from the churches used to wear black and white as well, so we do not have a patent on it.

    #870822
    MDG
    Participant

    “Hats were always a sign of kavod until Mr. John F. Kennedy came along and threw his hat off. “

    From what I heard, hats were becoming less popular anyways before JFK. He just accelerated that trend.

    #870823
    musser zoger
    Participant

    If you look at photos of Jews back in old Europe pre-Holocaust, you will see that most of them are not wearing black hats; most are wearing gray hats.

    Yes. This is correct. If you look at pre war photos of bochrim from the Chofetz Chaim’s Radin Yeshiva most are wearing gray fedoras. Even rare pictures of the CC show him wearing a cap. This black hat custom is an American Yeshiva modern Orthodox thing probably started in Telshe or Lakewood. Definitely no mesorah for it from the alte heim.

    #870824
    derszoger
    Member

    So what? And gray hats were worn 400 years ago? It was some other kind of hat. The uniform of bnei Torah has changed over time. But there always was a uniform. And always included some sort of hat or headgear. Today it is a black hat.

    In 150 years? Who knows. Maybe we’ll all be wearing Spodiks.

    #870825
    musser zoger
    Participant

    Simon says “wear a black hat”.

    #870826
    OneOfMany
    Participant

    Or beanie propeller hats.

    #870827
    Think first
    Member

    From pictures I’ve seen it seems that’s chassisish rabanim and some chassidim not all though wore black hats many others wore gray , sometime after the war in America the hats slowly changed to black until it becames what it is now the yeshiva symbol. It’s not inherently different from any other color that one can wear blue brown for example in fact in a hundred years the color may change but whatever the color is at any particular time is the symbol and uniform accepted by those in that class of people

    #870828
    avhaben
    Participant

    I wonder what his commander would react if a Army Lieutenant tossed his camaflouge hat and replaced it with a beige one.

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