Chasidishe Schechita

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  • This topic contains 15 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  mw13 2 years ago.
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  • #1334361

    Joseph
    Participant

    What does Chasidishe Schechita mean? How’s it different than Litvishe Schechita?

    #1334435

    ☕ DaasYochid ☕
    Participant

    It means the shochet’s wife shaves her head.

    #1334519

    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Its difficult to generalize but Chassideshe hashgachos are generally considered the “gold standard” of kashruth and are usually also subject to much more scrutiny and challenge by their clientele than the national commercial lines; Just because a hashgacha is labled “chassidish” does not always mean it is governed by a Chassidic Rav; Because of its premium reputation, the term has been distorted on occasion, to includes a big part of Litvish world. Overall its a general term for hashgachos that impose more strict standards, churahs and gedarim but it obviously is the quality of .their mashgichim, shochtim, etc. are yirai shamayim, talmedei chachamim and have very extensive training in all technical matters of kashruth. Most of the larger chassideshe hashgachos require frequent “continuing education” and offer on-site and centralized programs to assure that their mashgichim etc. are updated on all the newest information. Of course, there are also some other hashgachos (e.g. Eidah in EY) but those who are machmir on kashruth more often than not prefer a chassideshe hashgacha. Most of the larger chassidus have their own hashgachos which may vary slightly in certain areas of focus but not in their overall adherence to the highest quality standards. Some of the smaller “boutique” Chassideshe hashgachos may team with larger national lines and overlay their own standards on certain issues (e.g. chalav yisroel, etc). No one ever went wrong with reliance on a top of the line Chassideshe hashgacha.

    #1334617

    apushatayid
    Participant

    “Its difficult to generalize”, yet….

    #1334665

    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    To a pushatayi yid…..

    The art of generalization is to avoid statements which subsume facts not widely agreed upon and to create a generic stereotype wherein the exceptions swallow the rule of general applicability. Does that make sense??

    #1334676

    mentsch1
    Participant

    gadol hadora
    It’s really best to avoid commenting on things like this because few of us outside the industry really know. There is variation in everything, with numerous different hechsherim relying on nu,erous different standards and heterim. Ideally you find a Rav knowledgable in kashrus and ask them which hechsherim to rely on.
    As to your comment on gold standard
    I can think of at least two heterim that some chassidish hechsherim rely on that causes my litvisha poskim to avoid THOSES SPECIFIC hechsherim in regards to certain types of meat and bakeries that bear those hechsherim.
    Now ordinarily I wouldn’t post something negative like this because it can be misconstrued, however since your comment could be taken to mean that we can always rely on chassidish hechsherim i decided to reply. Bottom line, learn about kashrus and rely on a good Rav.

    #1334682

    apushatayid
    Participant

    You are passing off your assumptions as facts with the caveat that it really isnt a good idea to generalize.

    #1334685

    GH: This is at least the second time that you have used the term “gold standard” with chasidesheh hashgachos. I for one do not believe that. You wrote “No one ever went wrong with reliance on a top of the line Chassideshe hashgacha.” The incident in Monsey a number of years ago and one in Flatbush where actual tarfus was found in these establishments that were under chasidesheh hashgachos.

    #1334723

    Joseph
    Participant

    I have no dog in this argument, but Monsey was not Chasidish. I don’t think the Flatbush incident was either. (The Monsey was far worse, though.)

    #1334761

    mentsch1
    Participant

    Joseph
    If we are talking about the Flatbush Ave J incident from around 10 years ago, you are correct, it was not a chassidish hechsher.
    Unfortunately I used to buy meat there, at the time I was told I didn’t need to kasher my keilim.

    #1334781

    iacisrmma
    Participant

    Joseph: I take back my comment regarding the two incidents I mentioned above. The Monsey incident was someone selling meats he claimed were from a certain distributor when they weren’t. The Flatbush incident was selling AgriProcessor products that were advertised as glatt but weren’t.

    #1334780

    apushatayid
    Participant

    Before calling anything the “gold standard”, it behooves the consumer to learn what standards are followed by the hechsher they are looking to rely on, and then equally important, determine what procedures they have in place to ensure those standards are being met.

    #1334763

    mentsch1
    Participant

    That flatbush incident caused me to be a lot more careful and look into hechsherim and I became a lot more makpid. I walked out of a fleishik restaurant last night even though most people would rely on that hechsher. Simply because there are only a handful of hechsherim that I have vetted enough to rely on for fleishiks. 10 years ago I would have eaten that hechsher without a second thought.

    #1334837

    ubiquitin
    Participant

    For the real answer there are 3 main differences:
    chasidishe shechita:
    1) uses only chasidish shochtim
    2) they have an extra person who checks the chalaf
    3) they remove feathers from the chicken’s neck before shechting to avoid chalada. (Rema says not to do this, others disagree)

    #1334858

    mw13
    Participant

    Isn’t there also some kind of difference in the actual knife?

    #1382159

    ☕ DaasYochid ☕
    Participant
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