Chemistry/Biology/Physics/Biochemistry/Math

Home Forums Decaffeinated Coffee Chemistry/Biology/Physics/Biochemistry/Math

Viewing 50 posts - 1 through 50 (of 87 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #601420

    Anyone have any questions on these topics, feel free to post!

    #841588

    TheGoq
    Participant

    I have no idea why i looked at this thread.

    #841589

    mto
    Member

    how do you explain the quatum theory (chemistry) to a grade 12

    and how do you connect it to bohr’s experiment

    #841590

    zeena.kasta
    Member

    umm. in Australia that is year 11. Ok in what reference to Bohr’s experiment. perhaps you can explain electronic configeration or the shells. I dont know, you tell me.

    #841591

    WIY
    Member

    I hate brilliant people!

    #841592

    mto
    Member

    the quatum theory and the light spectrum

    #841593

    Pegger
    Member

    Quantum theory basically says that energy can only exist in discrete quanta (basically specific amounts that increase in jumps). This is related to the shells – for an electron to become “excited” (or jump) to a different shell, it has to gain that specific amount of energy.

    I’m not sure which experiment you are referring to, but if you mean the one involving hydrogen spectra, it’s basically like this:

    He filled a tube with hydrogen gas and shot some electricity at it. The tube then emitted light. However, instead of seeing a nice contiguous rainbow of colours, he saw discrete, disconnected bars of colour. The reason for this is because the electrons in the hydrogen gas were absorbing these specific quanta of energy they needed to become excited to a higher shell. However, electrons don’t particularly like to be excited – they like to be in the “ground state”, or shell number one. Therefore, they immediately hop back down to the ground state and EMIT this energy they absorbed as LIGHT.

    Now to the quantum theory: Since the electrons could only absorb specific quanta of energy to become excited, they can only emit the same quanta of energy when they hop back down! This is why only certain colours were emitted from the tube. Each colour corresponded to a different energy lever which corresponded to a different shell of the hydrogen atom.

    #841594

    i said so
    Member

    thecuriosone-

    thanx for starting this thread

    now i’ve got no questions but when ill have one ill ask!

    #841595

    koillel101
    Member

    What number is a counterexample to this rule- “the square of all numbers is a positive number”

    #841596

    mto
    Member

    if i understand correctly it means that energy does not behave like a wave but rather like a particle. that particle of energy contains a certain amount of energy. when absorbed by an electron the electron is excited and jumps a shell when the electron goes back to its stable state it releases a photon this is the light that we see.according to the amount of energy that the electron absorb the light of the photon will differ.

    #841597

    Studying for the MCAT?

    OK I’ve got one for you – what is the role of hexokinase in energy synthesis?

    #841598

    Oh, and what are the physical symptoms of dopamine antagonism? What are the different types of dopamine inhibition and how do they affect behavior?

    #841599

    Just one more – does Math include statistics?

    If so can you please explain to me Poisson equations? I actually have to program it for work and can’t quite get it.

    (PS all the above are stuff I’m currently working on)

    #841600

    And to provide an answer – Koillel101 are you thinking of irrational #s?

    I don’t believe that’s possible with real integers.

    #841601

    OneOfMany
    Participant

    Irrational numbers are no good either.

    #841602

    Unless you start with imaginary numbers:

    (i)^2=-1

    #841603

    pascha bchochma-

    Hexokinase is the enzyme that starts off glycolysis in eukaryotes. It phosphorylates glucose on the 6 carbon to create glucose-6-phosphate. This requires the input of 1 ATP molecule to drive the reaction forward.

    However, if glycogen is the starting reactant of glycolysis, a different enzyme breaks down glycogen into glucose-1-phosphate units (starch phosphorylase), and then hexophosphomutase isomerizes the molecule to glucose-6-phosphate. This does not require the use of ATP.

    While hexokinase is normally used in almost all cells in our body, a competing enzyme, glucokinase, is used by the liver to eventually create glycogen from glucose. So which enzyme is uses, and when?

    Due to the fact that the Km of hexokinase is around 1 micro-molar and glucokinase has a Km about 100 times that, hexokinase works best at low glucose concentrations (which makes sense- we want our glucose to be utilized for cellular respiration), while at high glucose concentrations glucokinase kicks in (more glucose=storage as glycogen).

    #841604

    OneofMany – now you have me curious.

    #841605

    OneOfMany
    Participant

    The square of any real number is positive. You were referring to i, no?

    #841606

    tro11
    Member

    Which is the last enzyme involved in glycogenolysis?

    #841607

    Which is the last enzyme involved in glycogenolysis?

    I’m assuming you mean “glycolysis” πŸ™‚

    The last enzyme involved in glycolysis is pyruvate kinase, which converts enolate into pyruvate. Pyruvate can then go through different routs:

    Aerobic Respiration: pyruvate moves from the cytosol to the matrix of the mitochondria to go through the Krebs Cycle (Citric Acid Cycle).

    Anaerobic Respiration: if there is no oxygen, pyruvate can go through either lactic acid synthesis (whereby pyruvate is turned into lactic acid) or ethanol synthesis (some microorganisms, such as yeast, utilize. Pyruvate is decarboxylated and reduced to ethanol, releasing CO2). The main idea of anaerobic respiration is to oxidize NADH to NAD+, which is necessary for a middle step of glycolysis (the conversion of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate to glycerate-1,3-bisphosphate, which reduces NAD+ to NADH).

    #841608

    how do you explain the quatum theory (chemistry) to a grade 12

    and how do you connect it to bohr’s experiment

    To answer your question – quantum theory (at least in depth) is not something that’s taught in high-school level physics, neither in undergrad college. However, what I think you mean is the quantum theory of electronic configuration, which I am more than happy to explain:

    Quantum theory of electronic configuration defines the “address” of an electron. According to the Pauli Exclusion Principle, no two electrons may have the same address (which makes sense – no two electrons can be exactly in the same place at the same time!).

    There are four “quantum numbers”, which define many characteristics of electrons.

    FIRST QUANTUM NUMBER: This is denoted as “n”, and defines the shell in which the electron is occupying. The value for n may go from 1-infinity.

    SECOND QUANTUM NUMBER: This is denoted as “l”, and really refers to the angular momentum of the electron (something that we are not going into at the moment). The value for “l” goes from 0 to n-1, and refers to which subshell (s,p,d,f, etc) the electron is in.

    THIRD QUANTUM NUMBER: This is also known as the “magnetic quantum number”, and refers to the orbital in the subshell that the electron is occupying. Its values range from -l to +l (thats “l”, not “1”).

    FOURTH QUANTUM NUMBER: Also known as the “spin” of the electron, this refers to which way the electron is rotating around it’s axis (much like the planets do). The possible values are +1/2 and -1/2.

    The reason for any of the above quantum numbers is extremely complicated, as it goes into some serious quantum theory that is beyond my comprehension in its entirety.

    As to Bohr’s experiment – I’m not quite sure as to what you are referring to.

    Hope that helps!

    #841609

    if i understand correctly it means that energy does not behave like a wave but rather like a particle. that particle of energy contains a certain amount of energy. when absorbed by an electron the electron is excited and jumps a shell when the electron goes back to its stable state it releases a photon this is the light that we see.according to the amount of energy that the electron absorb the light of the photon will differ.

    Yup, that’s absolutely correct! The amount of energy released is dependent on what shell the electron is jumping back to (say, from n=3 to n=1). That energy is related to the frequency of light by the following equation:

    E=hf or E=hc/lambda

    where “e” is the energy we are concerned with, “h” is the Planck constant, “c” is the speed of light (approximately 3×10^8 m/s in a vacuum), and “lambda” (the Greek letter) stands for the wavelength of that electromagenetic energy. If the wavelength is 300-800 nm in length, we are able to see it.

    Interesting tidbit: as you can see from the second equation, there is an inverse relationship with lambda and the energy of light. That’s why ultraviolet light (lower wavelength than 300 nm) has much higher energy than regular light, and potential damaging factor to cells – particularly DNA and its sythesis/replication process.

    #841610

    tro11
    Member

    I’m assuming you mean “glycolysis” πŸ™‚

    Haha no I mean glycogenolysis (the conversion of glycogen to glucose). If you want, I can take over this thread for you.

    #841611

    Haha no I mean glycogenolysis (the conversion of glycogen to glucose). If you want, I can take over this thread for you.

    Whoops! Complete misunderstanding. Simple answer – glycogen phosphorylase.

    But feel free! πŸ™‚

    #841612

    yentingyenta
    Participant

    what are the 2 of you studying in that you know all this?

    (and even i knew glycolosis and glyconeogenesis are 2 dif things)

    #841613

    Finally – let me ask a question:

    What is beta oxidation, and how does it help camels?

    #841614

    and even i knew glycolosis and glyconeogenesis are 2 dif things

    My mistake πŸ™‚ But for the record, I thought he meant glycolysis because that’s what the thread was talking about at the time.

    #841615

    yentingyenta
    Participant

    i hear but you didn’t answer my other q

    #841616

    tro11
    Member

    Whoops! Complete misunderstanding. Simple answer – glycogen phosphorylase.

    Nah, that’s the first enzyme. Answer is phosphoglucomutase in the muscle, and glucose-6-phosphatase in the liver.

    Don’t worry, you’ll learn all this in medical school, if that’s what you’re studying for. πŸ™‚

    #841617

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    Are you taking the MCAT? I never went to college, but I took a practice one just for fun. I got a 38. That doesn’t sound very good, but someone told me it is good because it is only out of 45, not out of 100.

    So a 38/45= .84, so it is like an 84 out of 100. It still doesn’t sound very good, but I guess it was better than this guy got.

    #841618

    Don’t worry, you’ll learn all this in medical school, if that’s what you’re studying for. πŸ™‚

    How did you guess? πŸ˜‰ But that’s good to know!

    But doesn’t phosphoglucomutase convert glucose-1-phosphate to glucose-6-phosphate? Or am I mistaking that with another enzyme?

    #841619

    And tro11-

    While I’ve got you here – what’s a good book to study anatomy before med school? I’m in my gap year right now, and I would like to get a head-start before med school.

    Thanks!

    #841620

    tro11
    Member

    But doesn’t phosphoglucomutase convert glucose-1-phosphate to glucose-6-phosphate? Or am I mistaking that with another enzyme?

    Yes, that is correct.

    #841621

    tro11
    Member

    And tro11-

    While I’ve got you here – what’s a good book to study anatomy before med school? I’m in my gap year right now, and I would like to get a head-start before med school.

    Thanks!

    Well the textbook I used was Moore’s Clinically Oriented Anatomy, which is a good book, but I don’t know if you should get it yet if you might use a different textbook in your school.

    #841622

    Well the textbook I used was Moore’s Clinically Oriented Anatomy, which is a good book, but I don’t know if you should get it yet if you might use a different textbook in your school.

    Thanks for the advice – I’m thinking about getting Netter’s Atlas as well.

    #841623

    tro11
    Member

    Yeah definitely get Netter’s Atlas – you will definitely need it.

    #841624

    Ctrl Alt Del
    Participant

    Hey, I’m looking for a good hand book now. (of course I mean anatomy of the hand/wrist) any suggestions?

    #841625

    Yeah definitely get Netter’s Atlas – you will definitely need it.

    It looks really great! What do you think of Acland’s videos?

    #841626

    tro11
    Member

    They’re okay – I don’t think I would buy them, but they might be helpful if you want to get a head start and have the patience to sit through them.

    #841627

    @ thecuriousone –

    Guyton’s “Textbook of Medical Physiology”. That’s physiology, not anatomy, but I think it will give you a much better headstart. Physiology (on the cellular level) gives you a really good insight into life.

    #841628

    Thanks, the curious one.

    What about Poisson and dopamine?

    #841629

    Health
    Participant

    Tro & curiousone -I hate Biochem along with everything else you mentioned. I hope Bezras Hashem I don’t remember a thing about any of those subjects (only during test time). Also, you better get a good DVD or CD program on anatomy because when you get to your Surgery rotations you won’t know what anything is, like most students. Not that I knew everything, but I knew more than most clowns. Also get a medical terminology book to study from beforehand, like Shiland’s or Davi-Ellen Chabner’s. And also buy a Physical Diagnosis book like Swartz’s. If you finish these get a Pathology book. Goljan wrote Rapid Review Pathology. All these I have -doesn’t mean that these are the best -there might be better ones.

    #841630

    Ctrl Alt Del
    Participant

    Oh, Yes. I’m the great pretender…… everyone sing along. What? no one remembers The Platters?

    #841631

    Ctrl Alt Del
    Participant

    “Also get a medical terminology book to study from beforehand, like Shiland’s or Davi-Ellen Chabner’s”

    AHH yes, two great books for the ALLIED health practitioner, heh heh…If I could guess…. I would say these books make up a suggested reading list for a paramedic course. Close huh?

    #841632

    (i)sqd isnt -1 but +1 b/c a negative times a negative is always positive,

    but to get a negative # wen sq rooting sumthing u wud need to be sq rooting a negative #, for example the sq root of -12 so then u would have i times sq root of 12, so u wud get

    2i(sq root of 3)

    #841633

    ultimateskier-

    I think it would help you if you knew what “i” is. It is (-1)^1/2, or “the square root of -1”. If you then square “i”, the radical falls off, and you are left with -1.

    ((-1)^(1/2))^2 = -1

    #841634

    Health
    Participant

    Ctrl Alt Del -“AHH yes, two great books for the ALLIED health practitioner, heh heh…If I could guess…. I would say these books make up a suggested reading list for a paramedic course. Close huh?”

    Funny I don’t recall posting to you, but you seem to have to constantly post about/to me. What – you don’t have a spouse to annoy?

    And your posts are getting dumber by the minute. Since when do Medic courses require Med. Terminology? Maybe you’ll find a few, but most don’t require it. It’s time for you to learn about what is going on around you in the medical field, even though you are just a Nurse’s Aid in an ICU!

    #841635

    brainy
    Participant

    Come on Health, what are you? Tell us, tell us, then we will stop bothering you.

    We don’t even know who you are so just tell us what you do. Are you a nurse?

    #841636

    feivel
    Participant

    i have a physics question:

    why when on a merry-go-round, especially a fast one, you can clearly feel the circular motion and some even get dizzy,

    but we dont feel the rotation of the earth?

    the merry-go-round is only moving a few miles per hour

    the earth is rotating at over 1,000 miles per hour.

Viewing 50 posts - 1 through 50 (of 87 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.