“cholent” vs. “chulent”

Home Forums Decaffeinated Coffee “cholent” vs. “chulent”

  • This topic has 16 replies, 10 voices, and was last updated 6 months ago by amom.
Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)
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  • #2056230
    Johnny Picklesauce
    Participant

    How do you pronounce the shabbos staple? Any good recipes or tips how to make or enhance it?

    #2056255
    Hohum
    Participant

    A teaspoon of dried ginger in the mix adds a lot of flavour but no actual taste of the ginger.

    #2056270
    akuperma
    Participant

    either will do.

    As with all languages, vowels frequently shift between dialects, and some Yiddish dialects said “oo” (as in “boo” or “moo”) and some said “oh” (as in “go” or “so”).

    #2056281
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Use a higher quality, lower fat meat or substitute dark meat turkey or one of the new beef substitutes; try using less salt, experiment with lentils in lieu of the standard beans and try sneaking in some dark green leafy vegetables. Also, keep the pot on the edge of the blech if it tends towards “hot” to avoid drying out by shabbos lunchtimel

    #2056294
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    The Hungarians have a joke, what is the difference between Lot’s wife and solet (pronounced sholet), the answer is nothing they both became salt. The meaning in Hungarian as chulent is pronounced is solet meaning became salt as ‘so’ means salt and ‘let’ means became.

    #2056333
    commonsaychel
    Participant

    It it Kokoosh or Koko-os?

    #2056362
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    it is koko-osh written in Hungarian as kakaos.

    #2056371
    Johnny Picklesauce
    Participant

    I’m definitely cholent, and I suggest adding 2-3 fresh garlic cloves; it really enhances it!

    #2056441
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Reb E might confirm if a “salty” Ungarishe chulent (or “cholent”) is culinary apikorsus

    #2056502
    amom
    Participant

    I like to saute an onion, sear the cheek meat, add 3/4 cup chulent/cholent mix, 1 cup barley, lots of spices, a bit of kechup, put a lot of water. Enjoy!!!

    #2056596
    CTLAWYER
    Participant

    My eldest BIL’s family calls it Chunt. They hailed from Minsk in the 1880s

    #2057057
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    When we were really little kids, a grandparent originally from Minsk served us something on Shabbosim she called “Plov” which in my vague recollections looked like and tasted like the stuff we now call cholent, chulent or chunt.

    #2057120
    OrangeCountyChapper
    Participant

    I was driving on the Long Island Expressway sometime in the last year and passed a car with the license plate “CHOLENT”. This made me both hungry and quite envious. I have since done teshuva by giving tzedakah to the Clean Air Fund.

    This thread gives me comfort that I could apply for a vanity plate with one of the alternate spellings.

    #2057162
    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    OCC: I have since done teshuva by giving tzedakah to the Clean Air Fund.

    You can now purchase a customized Harley that runs on Methane that will go a long way towards your teshuvah obligations and desire to promote tikun olam.

    #2057275
    commonsaychel
    Participant

    @GH I contribute to the ozone level by snowmobiling without an exhaust system, UTVing an older model and driving a diesel car.

    #2057646
    rightwriter
    Participant

    whats the secret for the meat to stay soft and strandy? Is it the type of meat used or the way you cook it?

    #2058121
    amom
    Participant

    The type of meat is important. Cheap chulent meat is meant to add taste to the chulent but the meat itself isn’t the greatest. I like to use cheek meat.

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