Davening on Yom Kippur

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  • #590467

    FunnyBunny
    Member

    Any tips on how to stay in shul the whole Yom Kippur? I find it very hard after a couple of hours to keep my attention span while davening- and it has nothing to do with the fact that I’m fasting.

    #974549

    postsemgirl
    Member

    You have to have a baal tefilah that has a good voice like by us… I guess I’m a little biased on that.

    #974550

    FunnyBunny
    Member

    The Baal Tefillah is not the problem.

    #974551

    If you are really thrown inside your davening, and shuckling hard etc. it makes it pass fatser (and more meaningful), and then if you space out for a couple of minutes here and there, it’s not so bad. “Echad Hamemaet vechad hamarbeh, ubilvad sheyechaven es libo leshomayim” (I hope I quoted that right:)

    #974552

    postsemgirl
    Member

    You should think to yourself five more minutes and then you’ll realize you can handle five minutes and then another and another and another

    #974553

    The Baal T’filla makes the difference… if there’s a geshmake davening – the time flies!!

    #974554

    feivel
    Participant

    when you start to feel empty of emotion:

    pretend to cry over your chatayim

    become an actor

    you dont have to fool those around you but fool yourself

    just act it out

    pretend someone is watching you who cant see inside you, only your outside

    try to fool this person

    try to make it as real as you can

    see what happens

    youll be surprised

    #974556

    areivimzehlazeh
    Participant

    Try to get inspiration from the people around you- real emotion, real kavonah, real tears.

    Listen- you’ve got real aveiros… (we all do)

    #974557

    haifagirl
    Participant

    Feivel:

    Great suggestion.

    #974558

    ZachKessin
    Member

    In my case I’m just normally totally lost. My Hebrew is just not up to following the davening. On a regular Shabbat I can more or less keep up due to knowing the text reasonably well, but on YK and RH there is no way I can do it.

    #974559

    mazca
    Member

    Well put it in your heart, feel it, live it, understand it, be scare of Yom Hadin, and believe me you wont fall to sleep. It is not a joke the biggest day of the year.

    #974560

    areivimzehlazeh
    Participant

    ZachKessin- with an English machzor, try learning the meaning of the t’fillos (if not every word, at least the concept of each) a few weeks before… even now, it’s not too late to start with a few main t’fillos.

    Go through the ‘ahl chet’s and some other main t’fillos that are repeated throughout.

    If possible, take an English machzor to shul- you can use it as reference here and there.

    This is the biggest opportunity we’ve got- make some time to understand what we’re davening for.

    Much Hatzlocha!

    #974561

    Be Happy
    Participant

    Yes, an English Machzor helps. I just got a linear one which is great. I also picture myself in a courtroom.

    #974562

    FunnyBunny
    Member

    Thanks, everyone! Most of the suggestions should prove IY”H to be very helpful!

    #974563

    amok
    Participant

    Not to deny the angst of the Yom Hadin, YK is also the Yom Matan Torah Shebaal Peh, and no less a joyous day than Shavuos! If neither of these mindsets works for you, sit in the back and learn Mishnayos or Maseches Yuma quietly. Kesiva vaHasima Tova,— and Chag Sameach,

    #974564

    amok
    Participant

    A chassidic tale comes to mind: An am ho’oretz wanders into a shtibbel on erev YK as people are preparing for Kol Nidre. He picks up a siddur and looks in, but he is bewildered by the many pages and strange letters. All around him are covered in tallesim, humming, wimpering, so he goes up to the front where the Rebbe is sitting facing the people. He asks: “Rebbe, where are we holding? The Rebbe looks up, and in tears says: Me? I am holding by last Chanuka!”

    If you can, try rereading the slichot, and if you can find them in an old mahzor, the Slichot for Yom Kippur. I came into possesion of a stand alone volume of slichot YK from Zhitomir about 130 years old, with pages dimpled I think by tears. You can also find them in old mahzorim from the twenties often British, but the english translations are not true to text, or as regesh provoking. Hatzlacha in Avoda

    #974565

    abx
    Participant

    Leave your watch/clock at home. It works!

    #974566

    FunnyBunny
    Member

    amok- I would learn Mishnayos/Gemara, but I can’t, being that I’m female. But thanks for the suggestion, nevertheless.

    abx- thanks, i’m sure it would help, but the clock is on the wall directly in front of my seat! 😉 oh, well.

    #974567

    mybat
    Member

    I like to pray at a minyan where the chazan prays very fast. That way they keep you on your toes and you don’t start getting distracted.

    #974568

    FunnyBunny
    Member

    mybat- I hear what you’re saying, but then I get so lost and confused that it’s not worth it. Either way, I daven with my family so I don’t have much of a choice there.

    #974569

    mybat
    Member

    Just be positive! Enjoy praying!

    #974570

    ZachKessin
    Member

    I use a Hebrew/English Machzor (Props to Artscroll for excellent work here) but I still get lost. Maybe I will see if my Rabbi has some time to sit down with me Shabbat afternoon to go over some of it with me. OK we won’t get all of the teffilah done, but if we can at least catch a few bits It may go a long way to helping me feel less lost.

    Email sent to my Rabbi, hopefully we can do this 🙂

    –Zach

    #974571

    Jax
    Member

    perfect line–May we pour our hearts out to Hashem on Yom Kippur with purity and deep sincerity!

    #974572

    Mayan_Dvash
    Participant

    Reading Tefillah Zaka gets me in the right frame of mind (my Hebrew comprehension is pretty good, but if you have an English Machzor, I’d say reading the English is more important than “saying the words”).

    Some machzorim have stories on the bottom, “below the line” which I find interesting. I daven in a Gerrer Shtibel so we finish Mussaf around 2PM. Between 2 and the start of mincha (usually 5PM) I relieve my wife from watching the kids so she can daven and try to learn myself. In a way the Gerrer Chassidim are part of “Yeshivas Mordechai Hatzadik” of Yom Kippur because when they close their machzorim, many of them open up a sefer.

    ;

    #974573

    amok
    Participant

    FunnyBunny and others: A woman is required to daven only once a day and in no format or time restraint. Therefore to remain in shul throughout the tefilla is meritorious if you can make it worthwhile, but not required. One well invested heartfelt tefilla, and the viduiim is quite enough, and in the presence of a tzibbur, even more than enough. Also bear in mind that most of the concepts of tefilah we learn from Chana and the Haftara of Rosh Hashana. The rest of the time can be spent in whatever way you can enrich and beautify the Yom Tov. Ketiva vachatima tova.

    #974574

    pookie
    Member

    if u understand how serious yom kipor is u wouldn’t have a problem i’m not saying i have but we should for sure strive to

    #974575

    ZachKessin
    Member

    I spent an hour or so over Shabbat sitting with my Rabbi going over the YK teffilah, so I feel a bit more prepared for YK. He also told me that when I get lost I can pass my machzor over to him and he will be happy to find the page for me.

    So I feel much much better.

    #974576

    ZachKessin
    Member

    Just a follow up. Yom Kippor this year was much better than last year where I was very frustrated. This year I felt much better and I think it was much more meaningful.

    #974577

    Jax
    Member

    ZachKessin: that’s great to hear! were you also using an artscroll?!

    #974578

    mazca
    Member

    In the middle of the amidah somebody approches me and starts telling me, you have my chair and you have my machzor, well what a test, and guess what? I didnt have her chair or machzor. You see. This is just the way of the Yrzer Hara to interrupt kavanah.

    #974579

    Bemused
    Participant

    Mr. Kessin,

    Your comments on this thread were very inspiring for me. Thank you.

    #974580

    FunnyBunny
    Member

    ZKessin- I’m glad everything worked out for you in the end, B”H.

    To all who responded in this thread: THANK YOU!! Yom Kippur was B”H a beautiful day for me and I got through it only because of you guys! A gut yahr to everyone in the CR!

    #974581

    ZachKessin
    Member

    Yes, I was using the Artscroll interlinear actually.

    And now back to work

    #974582

    Joseph
    Participant

    Bemused: Just wondering if you noticed my post on top of Page 3 of the Kapporos: Chicken thread?

    #974583

    pookie
    Member

    artscroll machzor is a life saver its so helpful and the footnotes r very interesting

    #974584

    WolfishMusings
    Participant

    My sons have the Artscroll interlinear machzor. I’ve always found it to be counter-intuitive in that you read the words themselves from left to right, but have to read the sentences from right to left (since they’re located beneath the Hebrew words).

    I’ve been using the same Metsudah machzor for the last twenty plus years*. Yes, the instructions are not as clear as in Artscroll, but I’ve always found that format much easier to use than the Artscroll format.

    The Wolf

    * I spent RH/YK in Scranton davening in the yeshiva one year when I was about fifteen. On Yom Kippur, they distributed a sheet of paper listing which pyutim they’d be saying in each of the tefillos. Twenty some odd years later, that folded up paper is *still* in my machzor. I use it as a bookmark.

    #974585

    Shticky Guy
    Participant

    Leave your watch/clock at home. It works!

    This is similar to my well tried and tested method.

    The more you watch the time, the slower time moves. But if you haven’t looked at a clock for a while then oh wow another 2 hours have passed.

    My tip is to virtually not look at the clock the entire day BECAUSE THERE IS NO NEED TO!

    My time schedule on yom kippur does not consist of hours and minutes but stages of davenning. I say to myself the time now is eg early part of shacharis or middle of musaf or towards the end of mincha etc. This way I find the day moves much quicker.

    If this tip helps anyone else then it was worth the time to post it.

    Wishing everyone a ??? ????? ???? and an easy fast!

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