did you make a shehecheyanu on carob?

Home Forums Bais Medrash did you make a shehecheyanu on carob?

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  • #619236

    mik5
    Participant

    In this case, you have uttered two names of Hashem in vain and have transgressed the grave sin of reciting a blessing in vain, as per the Halachically Speaking Web site!

    #1222919

    yungermanS
    Participant

    Harav Moshe Feinstein ZT”L would make a shehecheyanu every year on tu b’shvat always on Buckser, cause he was positive that he did not have any the entire year since the previous tu b’shvat

    #1222920

    mik5
    Participant

    Source please?

    The question is not if YOU personally ate it. The question is, is this fruit available the whole year round – in which case you cannot say the blessing!

    If I personally would refrain from eating apples for a year, would I bless sheheyechanu on them? Or oranges? Which (in NY) are certainly available year round.

    #1222921

    mik5
    Participant
    #1222922

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Yes –at least on Tu B’Shevat. Rebbetzin told me to make shehecheyanu after ha’etz 🙂

    #1222923

    Israeli Chareidi
    Participant

    The bugs were probably fresh – and seasonal.

    #1222924

    Nechomah
    Participant

    I would say that in the time that Moshe Feinstein lived, perhaps carob was not available year-round like it is now, so he paskened that he should say a shehecheyanu on it. Now that it is available, the psak could have changed.

    #1222925

    LB, did she tell you to check for bugs?

    Nechomah, it still isn’t (at least I don’t see it). Maybe in E.Y. it is, which is why R’ Elyashiv held not to say it.

    Mik5, how are you extrapolating a psak from R’ Elyashiv to other locales when the issue is availability?

    #1222926

    golfer
    Participant

    McFive, when I was in E”Y a few years ago and my husband asked our Rav a similar question, he told us that we should ask a poseik IN ERETZ YISRAEL.

    #1222927

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    DY, but guessing that they did so beforehand. The shul served the Tu B’Shevat fruit and foods with the rabbi leading brachot

    #1222928

    Were the dates cut open?

    #1222929

    takahmamash
    Participant

    . . . as per the Halachically Speaking Web site!

    One does not pasken halacha based on websites. That is why one has a Rav.

    #1222930

    Lilmod Ulelamaid
    Participant

    LB – I wonder if they expected each person to check his own fruit? At my friend’s Seudah, she put out the fruit without checking it and expected each person to check his own. But it’s possible that a shul function is different. I don’t know.

    #1222931

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    LU. Def don’t think that was the case here. The arrangement was full of bite size foods and precut and/or arranged for snacking.

    There was a fruit platter of pre washed grapes. Halved strawberries. I don’t remember what else.

    Dried fruits.

    Cookies for wheat.

    Dried barley as a decoration on the table cloth.

    Really beautiful and all ready to eat.

    Carobs from what I remember were placed in pieces on the table. I don’t remember if they had whole ones.

    #1222932

    Meno
    Participant

    Cookies for wheat.

    Dried barley as a decoration on the table cloth.

    What do those have to do with Tu B’Shvat?

    #1222933

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    The First 12 Fruits of the Seder

    “1. Wheat is the basis for our sustenance (see Psalms 81:17, 104:15, 147:14), but only after we labor to grow, harvest and prepare it. (Barley, although not included in the order of the meal, is one of the seven fruits for which Israel is praised. Often used for feeding animals. Its designation for the Omer offering inspires our efforts to harness our animalistic tendencies.)” Chabad

    2. Olives

    3. Dates

    4. Grapes

    5. Figs

    6. Pomegranates

    7. Etrogim

    8. Apples

    9. Walnuts

    10. Almonds

    11. Carobs

    12. Pears

    #1222934

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Barley we could eat hot at home on Tu B’Shevat

    #1222936

    Meno
    Participant

    Isn’t Tu B’Shvat about trees?

    #1222937

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Did you know that when Moshiach comes it is said that all trees will bear fruits?

    Even trees that have no fruits today

    They will have fruits that we have yet to know

    #1222938

    mik5
    Participant

    [as stated by HaRav Bodner shlit”a]

    #1222939

    mik5
    Participant

    From a note of Rabbi C.M.I. Hodakov, dated the eve of the 15th of Shevat, 5718, Brooklyn, NY

    I asked the [Lubavitcher] Rebbe if Shehecheyanu should be made on Bokser (carob), and the Rebbe answered that in Russia they would make the Brocho Shehecheyanu on carob.

    Vetzorich iyun gadol on the Rebbe’s comments, as the blessing is not said on fruits that are available year round, as mentioned earlier. Plus, on RH there is no obligation me’ikar hadin to have new fruits, and the blessing “…lazmen hazeh” would be intoned even if no such fruits were available, and would not be a bracha l’vatala c”v. What does that have to do with Tu B’Shvat? And how is it relevant that the blessing was recited in Russia? Vetzorich iyun gadol on what the Rebbe meant, if the Rebbe was actually paskening to say the bracha or just commenting. [To note that the Lubavitcher Rebbe was not a posek.]

    #1222940

    mik5
    Participant

    From Shmais Web site:

    It is questionable whether one says a Shehecheyanu when eating bokser, since it is inedible when fresh. One must wait until it hardens a bit before it becomes edible and then the new bokser is not any more distinguishable from older stock and thus would be similar to nuts upon which no Shehecheyanu is said (see Sefer Bircas HaShir Vehashevach for further elaboration).

    #1222941

    mik5
    Participant

    The blessing of Shehechiyanu is not recited over carob.

    And so ruled to me a known Chabad rav and posek.

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