Do I greet with a Gut Shabbos or a Gut Voch?

Home Forums Shabbos! Do I greet with a Gut Shabbos or a Gut Voch?

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  • #617530
    Joseph
    Participant

    If I’m heading to shul to daven Maariv while the other guy is heading home from Maariv, do I vintch him a Gut Shabbos or a Gut Voch? And how should he respond?

    #1145847
    Little Froggie
    Participant

    A gutte Voch. A gutte Yoch. A gutte something.

    #1145848
    147
    Participant

    With a Chodesh Tov uMevoroch, because even if already Nisson 2nd, there still remain 29 days of Nisson worthy of being felicitated with a Chodesh Tov uMevoroch.

    #1145849
    theprof1
    Participant

    Since it’s customary not to say Gut Shabbos after Mincha, of course you would say Gut Voch to the man. Besides you’re wishing him in accordance with his status, not your own.

    #1145850
    takahmamash
    Participant

    You say shavua tov, and let him wonder about you for the rest of the evening.

    #1145851
    Geordie613
    Participant

    Gut voch could be construed as being mavdil bein kodesh lchol. So, for that reason you should say Gut Shabbos.

    #1145852
    WolfishMusings
    Participant

    If you saw your friend at Shabbos Mincha and knew that you would not see him again until next week, would you not tell him a “Have a good week?”

    The Wolf

    #1145853

    No, I would be more inclined in such a situation to say “see you next Shabbos/week”

    #1145854
    WolfishMusings
    Participant

    No, I would be more inclined in such a situation to say “see you next Shabbos/week”

    OK, fair enough. To each their own.

    I would rather give him my best wishes for a good week rather than a simple “see you next week.”

    The Wolf

    #1145855

    Well there is no question you are a holier, kinder and more thoughtful being than I could ever be. But that is old news.

    #1145856
    apushatayid
    Participant

    People complain that in Brooklyn nobody says good shabbos to anyone. You see, they adopted this policy to avoid any shaylos such as the one raised by Joseph. If you ignore everyone the entire shabbos, then there is no question what to wish someone at any time and you avoid the machlokes haposkim that was presented here.

    #1145857
    Little Froggie
    Participant

    29, no, you could strive to be more holier, kinder, more thoughtful being. As long as you’re alive, (I suppose you are) you can achieve much. You could be!!! Trust in yourself. You made it nearly to the top, you’re a MOD!!!

    take it from a lowly little froggie

    #1145858
    lakewoodwife
    Participant

    We say ‘A Gutten’ from after mincha until Shabbos is over. (the response is ‘A Besserin’)

    #1145859
    WolfishMusings
    Participant

    Well there is no question you are a holier, kinder and more thoughtful being than I could ever be. But that is old news.

    I never said or implied any such thing. In fact, I think it’s downright offensive to mock me with those terms when you probably know my self-opinion is the opposite of that.

    The Wolf

    #1145860
    👑RebYidd23
    Participant

    Is nobody allowed to disagree with you?

    #1145862

    You misunderstood. I didn’t say YOU implied such a thing, I was stating that the reason for the disparity in our responses was simply because you are a holier person who is kinder and more thoughtful than I am. It might have been being silly, but I wasn’t mocking.

    #1145863
    WolfishMusings
    Participant

    You misunderstood.

    Fair enough. I apologize for mistaking your intentions, although I still believe it is wrong to attribute characteristics to a person that are the exact opposite of those that they hold of for themselves. Even if you don’t mean it to be mocking, it does come off that way.

    The Wolf

    #1145864
    WolfishMusings
    Participant

    Is nobody allowed to disagree with you?

    On halacha? Of course. On facts or science or history? Sure. On almost any other topic other than me? Go right ahead.

    But unless you know me personally, you have no right to make statements regarding my personality that are simply not true. The fact that they are for the good (as opposed to for the bad) is of little relevance – they are both groundless lies without any basis in fact (and, since you don’t know me in real life, there is no way you can say that they *are* based on fact).

    The Wolf

    #1145865

    I think you are very wrong. If a person is going to repeatedly misrepresent himself in a negative way, I think it is very much the obligation of those who can attest to his virtues to speak up to prevent others from believing his falsehoods.

    #1145866
    MRS PLONY
    Participant

    A gutten tamid.

    #1145867
    golfer
    Participant

    Trust a Lakewood Wife to know how answer Joseph’s shayla!

    I noticed everyone skipped right over her excellent response so I decided to step up to the plate…

    Thank you lakewoodwife!

    #1145868
    lakewoodwife
    Participant

    Thank for noticing, golfer!

    #1145869
    aquestioningjew
    Participant

    Does anyone else have Minhag not so say “goodnight” on Shabbos but only Gut Shabbos?

    #1145870
    The Queen
    Participant

    On Shabbos we greet each other with Gut Shabbos, morning, noon, and night. We also greet strangers on the street with a Gut Shabbos. That is an old minhag, which is unfortunately slowly becoming extinct due to the phenomenal growth of the town.

    #1145871
    Geordie613
    Participant

    My parents and grandparents were always particular that there is only ‘Gut Shabbos’ on Shabbos (and woe betide you if you didn’t say Good Shabbos to them.). No good morning, goodbye, good night or anything else. I never realised there was any other way until I met my wife’s family.

    We also don’t have the minhag not to say Good Shabbos after mincha. But apparently it’s got to do with Dovid HaMelech being niftar then.

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