Do We Believe in Heroes?

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  • #619408
    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Do we believe in heroes?

    BACKSTORY: The phlebotomist gave me a choice of two stickers, “I’m a Hero,” or “Hug Me, I was Great.” – I chose “Hug Me, I was Great.”

    1. Does Torah have heroes?

    We look up to and may try to emulate our patriarchs and matriarchs, as well as Chazal. Yet those are regular people, not heroes.

    2. Would you give your child/adult a sticker that says, “I’m a Hero”?

    Thank you 🙂

    #1221988
    ☕ DaasYochid ☕
    Participant

    The Avos and Imahos, and Chazal, were human beings, but far from “regular people”. They were on a spiritual level we can’t even begin to comprehend.

    #1221990
    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Did they have superhuman powers?

    #1221991
    ☕ DaasYochid ☕
    Participant

    Yes. Yaakov lifted the rock, and nevuah (prophesy) existed in times of Tanach, and we find amoraim bringing people back to life. It is said (I don’t know the source offhand) that even the least of the amoraim could perform techiyas hameisim (bringing someone back to life).

    There are many more examples.

    #1221992
    Lilmod Ulelamaid
    Participant

    It’s only because they were human beings that they can be role models for us. Malachim are not role models.

    That being said, as DY pointed out, they are way beyond us and “on a spiritual level we can’t even begin to comprehend”.

    But we are still supposed to consider them role models and try to emulate them in our own way.

    #1221993
    Lilmod Ulelamaid
    Participant

    “superhuman powers” is a goyish concept (at least when phrased that way).

    Hashem did perform nissim for them and they did have Ruach HaKodesh, but that has nothing to do with the term “superhuman powers”.

    I feel like the whole concept of “superhuman powers” borders on avoda zara a bit.

    It’s definitely not a Jewish concept. Our heros are people who conquer their yetzer haras and natural desires and tendencies. They are superhuman in that sense. And in that sense, we can all emulate them, each in his own way and on his own level.

    #1221994
    zahavasdad
    Participant

    Superman was actually has jewish roots

    #1221995
    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Can a teacher ask a boy, who is your hero?

    …And he may say, Yaakov or my tatti/aba/father/dad?

    Or ask a girl who is your hero?

    … And she may say Leah or my mame/ema/mother/mom?

    #1221996
    Lightbrite
    Participant

    ZD: How does Superman have Jewish roots?

    LU: Excellent point!

    “Superpowers” assumes that the power comes directly from the person who was gifted with some additional force without attributing it to holiness, or Hashem, and/or conquering the yetzar ha tov, b’esrat Hashem.

    #1221997
    👑RebYidd23
    Participant

    A hero is a type of sandwich.

    #1221998
    Lightbrite
    Participant

    RebYidd23: Are you really prepared for what may come next of such words, seeing how this was mentioned in a past thread?

    If you want, I can quote iacisrmma for you 😉

    #1221999
    👑RebYidd23
    Participant

    Due to the shocking nature of iacisrmma’s comment, I would strongly prefer that you not quote it.

    #1222000
    Lilmod Ulelamaid
    Participant

    LB – people always ask kids who their heros are. Or maybe they use the term “role model”? I’m not sure. They probably usually say heros.

    Kids often say their parents. If they are related to a Gadol, they will usually say that Gadol. Often, they will choose one of the previous Gedolim. They probably mention the Avos or Imahos sometimes, but I have a feeling that is less common than mentioning parents or Gedolim from previous generations. I think people find it harder to relate to the Avos, even though Chazal say that we are supposed to strive to be like them.

    #1222001
    Lightbrite
    Participant

    I thought that it has Greek roots though.

    Even if it’s used commonly today, isn’t it more like a secular concept chinuch-wise?

    Is a woman hero a shero?

    #1222002
    Lilmod Ulelamaid
    Participant

    What has Greek words – the word “hero”?

    #1222003
    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Yes. From Greek mythology

    #1222004
    Lilmod Ulelamaid
    Participant

    I didn’t realize that. In that case, good question.

    Here are a few possible answers:

    1. I’m mistaken and the word “hero” is not used, but rather other terms such as “role models” are used.

    2. There is nothing wrong with using the term, since that is no longer what it means. It is possible that there are many words that have negative origins but it doesn’t necessarily make the contemporary usage problematic.

    3. Most people are unaware of the origin of the word.

    My guess is that both 2 & 3 are correct. But that is just a guess.

    #1222005
    yungermanS
    Participant

    lets start working on ourselves towards hero’s or role models by removing ourselves from this temporary physical world & focusing on a life of spirituality & the future world like our forefathers & gedolim that were pure & holy & almost completely removed from physicality

    may YOU one day reach this high level & feel so close to Hashem like they did

    #1222006
    iacisrmma
    Participant

    LB: to answer Q2 of your OP, yes I would allow my child to wear a sticker that said “I am a hero!”.

    #1222007
    zahavasdad
    Participant

    The creators of Superman were jewish and the early Superman comics were somewhat taken from the Jewish experience at that time

    #1222008
    assurnet
    Participant

    I really really love visiting and davening by kivrei tzadikim. Last night I was zoche to go to the kever of Calev ben Yafuneh and while there I thanked Hashem for helping me to get there and told Him that Calev is one of my all time heros (as he risked life and limb even against multiple giants to daven at ma’arat hamachpela).

    #1222009
    Geordie613
    Participant

    ????? ?? ???? ????

    Let’s assume (for arguments sake – again don’t all jump on me) that the translation of hero is ‘gibor’. The posuk quoted above, (????? ?”? ?), in context refers to the malochim. However, it is often quoted in connection with the farmers who down tools for a year to observe shemitta. The gemora in Shabbos (?”? ?”?), also brings it to refer to the Bnei Yisroel who said na’ase v’nishma.

    Hence, a hero in Jewish thinking is, one who fulfils the word of Hashem when it is physically difficult and s/he nevertheless overcomes all barriers to do the correct thing.

    In this context, yes, we do very much believe in heroes!

    #1222010
    Redleg
    Participant

    LB, there seems to be some confusion over a definition of heroism. Some previous respondents want to conflate heroism with being a good role model. While there is, of course, considerable overlap, not all legitimate heroes are suitable role models. Likewise, many truly excellent role models may not be particularly heroic.

    Not believe in heroes, LB? Preposterous! Thank G-d there have been heroes in Yisrael who arose in time of need and did great things. There are heroes among us now who are moser nefesh for Torah and Klal Yisrael and G-d willing, new heroes will arise when we need them. You could be one of them.

    #1222011
    👑RebYidd23
    Participant

    According to the dictionary, a hero can be a person admired by others for achievements, courage, or noble qualities, a person with superhuman traits in mythology and folklore, the main character in a story, or a sandwich.

    #1222012
    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Redleg that was *beautiful* 🙂

    Thank you!!!

    Sending you blessings and may you always persevere sweetly and triumphantly with Hashem’s light.

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