do you support repeal & replace obamacare? πŸš«πŸ”€πŸ€΅πŸΏπŸ’‰β“

Home Forums Politics do you support repeal & replace obamacare? πŸš«πŸ”€πŸ€΅πŸΏπŸ’‰β“

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  • #1319476
    jakob
    Participant

    which plan do you feel is better for the middle class yid-that is just making ends meet with all tuition & mortgate bills etc…- & why? the current obamacare which offers more coverage but is democrats & might not be the best versus trumpmcare that might not cover enough for the middle class frum family.

    I am a Trump supporter & believe he is doing a great job & definitely better then Hillary but i’m not sure how much the new healthcare plan will hurt klal yisroel in the USA

    #1321643
    jakob
    Participant

    does anyone even know the differences of the current obamacare & the future plan?

    #1321715
    CTLAWYER
    Participant

    NO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    I am self employed (I own the law firm). I buy our health coverage through the CT State Exchange.
    My policy is issued by Connecticare, just as my plan was before ACA became law. It is the same level of coverage.
    Big Changes with ACA (incorrectly called Obamacare):
    No more lifetime or annual caps on coverage. In 2016, Mrs. CTL was on life support for 27 days and had 10 surgeries with 5 additional hospital admissions. Bill was more than $2.5 Million. Before ACA the policy had a $1 Million cap.
    I now can use any hospital in the state. 4 medical specialist we now use did not accept Connecticare prior to ACA.
    Single children can stay on parents’ policy until they are 26 years old. We made use of this for youngest Miss CTL. When the next older child was still in school and turned 21 she was forced off our policy.
    NO rejection for preexisting conditions. Mrs. CTL would not be able to get coverage under the different proposed ‘Trump’ Non-Care plans.

    BTW: It’s 4 years that I’ve had the plan and even with annual increases and my age in an older bracket, my monthly premium is $600 less than I paid before ACA.

    #1321716
    CTLAWYER
    Participant

    @Jakob
    “I am a Trump supporter & believe he is doing a great job & definitely better then Hillary .”

    Real nonsense comment. Trump cannot be doing a better job than H. Clinton as she never held the office. You can compare him to any of the 44 men who have been President, but not the billions of people who never were President.

    BTW>>>I am NOT a Trump supporter and think he is doing a terrible job, lying to the public, embarrassing the country and accomplishing little but playing golf at our expense.
    I hope he does not finish his term and that many of his team end up in prison for breaking the law

    #1321741
    kollelman
    Participant

    CTLawyer – you have a fringe case. I am on the verge of letting my NY insurance lapse, because I simply can’t afford 15k+/year (+ 400/month+ subsidy) for what essentially is a catastrophic coverage couple’s silver plan. A normal healthy couple does not usually use over 6k/year in doctor’s bills – the deductible until insurance kicks in.

    The ACA helps in some ways and hurts in others. The real conversation needs to be – how to get the government out of health care and allow the free market to work. When the fees are undisclosed, actually unknown, due to insurance generally covering the exorbitant fees charged by doctors and hospitals, there is never any negotiation. People negotiate with builders, plumbers, mechanics – everyone, except their doctor. A doctor’s visit with a blood test should not cost $500+. The prices are all fake, and it’s mostly due to lack of competition. Ask a hospital “how much is this procedure?”, and they will not know. It all gets billed later on, with an entire team of people who specialize in “medical billing”. It’s insane, and it needs to be fixed.

    #1321843
    CTLAWYER
    Participant

    @kollelman
    Things are different in every state.
    I don’t know your age, but Mrs. CTL and I are in our 60s, but I’m just below Medicare age.
    The total out of pocket for medical/hospital maximum increased to $1100 (per couple) on our plan this year. This also applies to drug co-pays. So, about Sept 10, we’ll have reached the max and Mrs. CTL’s drugs will have no co-pay for the rest of the year.

    Our policy costs approx $1,000 per month, before ACA it was $1645 with the same carrier with lesser coverage. If we bought the same level plan from the same carrier on the open market it is now quoted at $2295 month.

    I would love to see all us this replaced by a single payer plan good nationally.
    I have many friends who no longer winter in Florida because their plans are no longer good out of network, they’ll go south again once they are on Medicare

    #1321874
    ColumbiaGrad17
    Participant

    Single-payer healthcare is the best route to go, bar none.

    #1321887
    ubiquitin
    Participant

    Kollelman

    You contradict yourself therby identifying a big part of the problem

    You say “allow the free market to work. ” yet you correctly identify “A doctor’s visit with a blood test should not cost $500+. The prices are all fake,…. Ask a hospital β€œhow much is this procedure?”, and they will not know.”
    How can a free market work if you arent told the price ahead of time?

    (though this line “it’s mostly due to lack of competition” is nonsense. Google how many hospitals are in NYC.
    The reality is healthcare doesnt follow ordinary economic prinicples. IF a car is broken down you can shop around for the best mechnic, if a heart is “broken down” you can exactly ask the ambulance how much they will charge or direct the ambulance to the cheaper hospital.

    #1321880
    Avram in MD
    Participant

    kollelman,

    Your plan does sound terrible, I’m sorry. There is still a long way to go to improve health care and coverage in the U.S.

    I agree that the fees that medical providers charge are often exhorbitant. I do not believe this is due to insurance companies blindly paying out, however. When I receive explanations of benefits from my insurance company, they pay out only a pre-negotiated amount to the provider, and I am responsible for a pre-negotiated co-pay, either a fixed dollar amount, or a percentage of the pre-negotiated amount. The excess amounts (sometimes crazy!) charged by the provider is disallowed, and the provider is forced by the agreement with the insurance company to accept the amounts negotiated. Patients who are uninsured do not have this protection, and are at the mercy of whatever the provider bills.

    In your free market vision of health care, what is the role of insurance? Even if there is cutthroat competition among providers, the cost of care during a catastrophic event or prolonged illness is still going to be very high.

    #1321901
    zahavasdad
    Participant

    In the free market of insruance companies, Frum people would be considered undesireable

    Woman having alot of kids (Pregnacies cost money) and kids are always getting sick, so large families equals large insurance payouts. There is no way the insurance companies can make money on a frum family that has a kids every 15 months, they would just dump them

    #1321914
    kollelman
    Participant

    @ubiquitin – that is the exact problem. Currently, there is no free market. It’s the government and the insurance companies that own healthcare. An individual almost never has the ability to negotiate. The Christian healthcare groups that some have joined have some negotiating power, but that’s only because they are large enough to actually have some leverage.

    @Avram – I agree that insurance companies don’t blindly pay out, but as you mentioned, normal people don’t have that option. Insurance should be just like any other insurance, protection against catastrophe – calculated risk. Also, if a person doesn’t want coverage for X, Y, Z – why pay for it? For car insurance, you may affect others, so the state forces a minimum coverage. You want rent-a-car coverage, collision, fire, glass, you pay for those. This is not possible in healthcare with today’s laws. Additionally, due to the government being a guaranteed payer, rates are artificially high, since there is really no competition. Insurance companies often base their payout rates off of government negotiated prices.


    @zahavasdad
    – There can be a pool for high risk people – just like car insurance. Also, the prices would need to come down – (I propose aided by limits on medical malpractice lawsuits). People used to pay their doctor for pregnancy visits, and 200, 500, whatever to deliver a baby. Today’s rates are insane, probably due to the fact that OB/GYN doctors are probably paying 200k/year just for malpractice insurance.

    #1321951
    Avram in MD
    Participant

    kollelman,

    Additionally, due to the government being a guaranteed payer, rates are artificially high, since there is really no competition.

    Not sure what you mean here. Can you explain more? How is the government a guaranteed payer?

    There can be a pool for high risk people – just like car insurance.

    And insurance rates would be sky-high for those unfortunate enough to be delegated to the high risk group, if insurance companies even offered coverage to them (now required by the ACA). And that’s a lot worse than paying more for car insurance for your 16 year old, because sick people need medical care a whole lot more than teenagers need to drive. Health care and driving cars are not really comparable things, despite it sounding good in print.

    #1321963
    kollelman
    Participant

    Medicare/Medicaid are basically guaranteed. Hospitals, nursing homes, etc. bill the government and expect to get paid. eg. Drugs can cost $500/dose from the manufacturer and the government will pay that + a fee to the hospital for administering, etc… If the government was not footing the bill for millions of patients, there would be no way to effectively charge those rates for many drugs/services.

    I agree the rates would be high. It is definitely not anything like a 16yr old “needing” to drive. I argue more towards overall lowering of the costs through free market and lessening the artificially inflated jury awards for silly lawsuits. The current costs are not normal. No need for every pregnancy to cost 20k+. Also, people should be able to form their own groups and pool the risk, to prevent throwing individuals off the plan for high usage. This should not be tied to employment, and should rather be any group of people, yet allow the insurance company to bill them individually.

    #1321962
    Avram in MD
    Participant

    kollelman,

    People used to pay their doctor for pregnancy visits, and 200, 500, whatever to deliver a baby. Today’s rates are insane, probably due to the fact that OB/GYN doctors are probably paying 200k/year just for malpractice insurance.

    Part of it is the fact that a dollar today has a different value than it used to. A loaf of bread used to cost less than 20 cents. A Manhattan apartment could be rented for under $50 a month. Another part of it is the increased use of technology, which is expensive. The infant mortality rate is a lot lower today than it used to be. And yes, malpractice insurance does also play a role in the higher costs.

    Some “routine” interventions done in hospitals likely are not as necessary as they are made out to be. Also, for healthy pregnancies, birth at home or at a birth center with midwives is much less expensive than a hospital birth with an OB who is essentially a surgeon overseeing a natural process that usually does not require surgery.

    #1321969
    zahavasdad
    Participant

    Its about $5000 for a normal baby delivery and about $15,000 for a c-section

    Both are assuming mother and baby are healthy. If there are complications, the payments can sky-rocket. A Premie in NICU can cost in the MILLIONS if the baby has to be there for a significant amount of time (Like months)

    #1321983
    zahavasdad
    Participant

    BTW in older times a woman dying in childbirth was not so rare, today it rarely happens and B’H very few people know of such a case on a personal level and even if they do , its only 1 or 2 women

    #1321990
    ubiquitin
    Participant

    Kollelman

    “there is no free market.”
    nor can there be. People dont decide to have heart attacks. and when they do happen they cant go bargain hunting.

    “An individual almost never has the ability to negotiate”

    Its far worse than that. Say a hospital wants $100 for an Xray. The insurance with their bargaining power says ok we will give you $70 take it or lose our patients. The hospital then raises the bill to $150 The insurance company says ok we will give you $100 (which is what the hospital wanted.) Hospital is happy they get what they want , insurance company is happy since they are gettign a bargain
    The ones who realy lose are individuals without insurance who are now stuck with a bill for $150 that is more than the hospital even wants.

    Insurance for childbirth doesnt realy make sense. Try gettign car insurance and telling the insurance company yo plan on having a car accident r”l every year or few years.
    Similarly for preexisting conditions, some of which people are born with. trying buying homeowner’s insurance once a home is on fire

    #1322078
    DovidBT
    Participant

    How do hospitals and other medical providers get away with setting different prices for the same service, based on whether the customer has insurance? Why is that legal?

    #1322082
    Joseph
    Participant

    Folks, why don’t we make this very simple. Repeal the ACA and reinstate the laws and healthcare system that were in effect until the ACA came into law.

    #1322097

    Folks, why don’t we make this very simple. Repeal the ACA and reinstate the laws and healthcare system that were in effect until the ACA came into law.

    Once they give benefits (entitlements, if you prefer), it’s political suicide to rescind them.

    #1322095

    How do hospitals and other medical providers get away with setting different prices for the same service, based on whether the customer has insurance? Why is that legal?

    They probably have a significantly better rate of collection from insurance companies than from private people.

    #1322146
    CTLAWYER
    Participant

    @DovidBT
    “How do hospitals and other medical providers get away with setting different prices for the same service, based on whether the customer has insurance? Why is that legal?”
    They don’t set different prices, they contract a volume discount with each insurance carrier. This is perfectly legal.
    I just finished reviewing my MIL’s EOB from Anthem BlueCare (her Medicare replacement plan) for this years chemotheraphy at Yale Smilow Cancer Hospital.
    Yale billed $486,000. The contracted price for the service with Anthem is $28,900. MIL is responsible for her yearly maximum co-pay of $6700, Anthem pays Yale $22,200. Yale writes off over $450,000. If you were an uninsured individual billed the rack rate and unable to pay, Yale would lien your home (if you owned one) and probably forclose.
    The contract rate that Yale charges Medicaid, is less than Anthem is charged. The rate they charge Aetna is more. Every provider is free to negotiate volume contract discounts with insurance carriers. They will even negotiate fees with individuals who threaten to take their business to another hospital/provider.

    The key to the legality is that the rate for service is uniform, the negotiated discount varies. If you walk into Home Depot and want to buy 20 electric ranges they’ll give you a better price than if you want to buy one.

    #1322149
    Joseph
    Participant

    Health care providers have no choice but to demand full payment of their inflated list prices from the uninsured due to the federal law governing Medicaid. They couldn’t legally bill the uninsured less even if they wanted to.

    #1322183
    yehudayona
    Participant

    Wrong, Joseph. My under-26 daughter, who’s on our insurance, went to a doctor who she thought was in network. The problem was that we had switched plans but she retained her old insurance card. The doctor was in network for the old plan but not for the new one. We were informed that the rate was $x. The doctor’s office (part of a large hospital-affiliated group) said they’d give us a break, but they weren’t allowed to go below $y, which was a discount of maybe 20%-25%. Obviously that’s nowhere near the discounts that insurers negotiate.

    #1322206
    Joseph
    Participant

    I don’t know the intricacies, but federal law governing Medicaid and/or Medicare place severe restrictions on Medicaid or Medicare (it’s one or the other) accepting facilities from discounting the list rate for the uninsured.

    #1322295
    CTLAWYER
    Participant

    @Joseph
    I don’t think you mean “accepting facilities from discounting the list rate for the uninsured”
    It is those facilities who take ‘ASSIGNMENT’ who may not discount for the uninsured.
    Taking assignment means the provider agrees to take whatever payment Medicare authorizes for a particular procedure as payment in full and not bill the patient for additional money. There are providers who take payments from Medicare, but not assignment and expect the patient to pay the difference.

    Seniors who have opted for a replacement Medicare scheme (you see the booths set up in chain drug stores in the 4th quarter) are in for a rude awakening. They don’t have this protection.
    MIL was sold a replacement Medicare plan by Anthem, told she’d have better prescription coverage and no increase over the Medicare premium she already pays.
    Now, she is subject to a $400 twice per week co-pay for Chemo-theraphy. If she was still on straight Medicare, the hospital would have to accept the amount Medicare pays and she’d have no additional liability.
    She cannot switch plans until December open enrollment period.

    #1327456
    jakob
    Participant

    BREAKING NEWS : Senate Blocks GOP Health Bill, Scuttling Bid to Repeal Obamacare

    YES REPEALING OBAMACARE DID NOT GO THROUGH

    so is this good or bad news for the middle class yid-that is just making ends meet with all tuition & mortgage bills etc…- & why? are we -middle class people- better off staying with obamacare & what its pros are or is repealing & replacing better for our financing lives so we can still make ends meet?

    health insurance is expensive & can cost a family over $10,000 a year

    #1327473
    CTLAWYER
    Participant

    @jakob
    Is this good or bad news?
    Answer: It depends
    If you live in a state such as I do which has a well functioning state health exchange, it’s good news.
    If you live in a state that doesn’t have a health exchange through which to buy coverage it is bad news.
    If you only qualified for Medicaid after the ACA went into effect, it is good news. BTW>>>>before the ACA, many providers here on CT did not accept Medicaid. After ACA so many more people had Medicaid as their health coverage that acceptance became universal.

    #1330410
    huju
    Participant

    Most advanced industrialized nations have gone with some form of single-payer plan. The costs are generally about half of what the US spends on healthcare, and the care is just as good. Some products and services, e.g., healthcare, don’t work in so-called free-market systems. Stop worrying about nonsense and myths about the “miracle” of free markets. Look at what works and do it that way.

    #1330419
    Joseph
    Participant

    Single payer countries have notably longer waits for specialists than the US.

    #1330541
    CTLAWYER
    Participant

    @Joseph
    You can wait a long time for a specialist in the USA, as well

    MIL needs a complete evaluation by a gerontologist. Wife tried to arrange the appointment in early May. The soonest she could get an appointment within 50 miles (New Haven, Bridgeport, Stamford, Waterbury, Greenwich) was September 25

    #1330564
    Joseph
    Participant

    CTL, whatever it is, my point is that single payer countries have *much longer* waits for specialists than the US.

    #1330566
    ubiquitin
    Participant

    “Single payer countries have notably longer waits for specialists than the US.”

    Again, longer than whom? certainly not longer than the uninsured.

    Of course, your data isnt completely accurate. See the recently released “commonwealth fund international survey on health” Both Germany and France had lower wait times than the US (Though the US was better than other countries in this regard (though neither are true single payer systems, but there are very few in the world so I assumed you were using the term more liberally)
    Of cours ethe US DOES have single payer health insurance for those over 65, and I am not aware of any delays in treatment in that group
    And besides, what is the harm in waiting a bit longer for a non emergent visit

    However, if the thought of waiting really distresses you, the (main) reason waits are so long is to keep down costs. We can spend more than Canada does have extra specialists, likely stil spend less than we do and have shorter wait times than Canada does.

    huju
    ” and the care is just as good”
    that should read “The care is better”

    #1330574
    Joseph
    Participant

    Better than whom? The US has the best healthcare system in the world. Kings and rules and the rich from around the world come to the US when facing serious health problems.

    #1330583
    CTLAWYER
    Participant

    @ubiquitin
    I gave an example of a wait for a specialist by my MIL…she’s in her late 80s, on Medicare…that single payer system
    The Gerontologists only serve senior citizens, so they all are single payer (Medicare) patients. Again in a 50 mile in-state radius, the earliest appointment available was 4 months out.

    This is a non-emergency room type visit. The delay is devastating. Without the evaluation, the secondary insurers will not authorize coverage by in-home health aides, durable medical equipment (walker, wheel chair, commode, etc). She can’t gain admittance to certain care facilities or day programs. Event the Town Senior Citizen transportation won’t serve her without the evaluation. Unfortunately, we watch her slide downhill every day. We have offered to pay for a number of these services/programs, but without the gerontologists evaluation there is no entry. (In terms of durable medical equipment, she is currently using items that belonged to my late mother A”H. They sat in our garage, because Goodwill won’t accept used DME.

    #1330584
    ubiquitin
    Participant

    “The US has the best healthcare system in the world”

    In what way?

    “Better than whom?”
    Than the US.
    see the recent “Mirror, Mirror 2017: International Comparison Reflects Flaws and Opportunities for Better U.S. Health Care” put out by the Commonwealth fund they compared the US, Australia, Canada, the UK, The Netherlands, France Germany, Switzerland, Sweden, Norway, and New Zealand.

    the US has the worst care both overall and in almost every category they looked at.
    Of course they didnt use vague terms like “best healthcare” they looked at specific benchmarks:
    including care process, equity, Access to care, efficiency and of course outcomes

    See the report it is freely available online.

    If you have data that indicates that the US is “the best” please define in what way, and I’d love to see it

    #1330593
    ubiquitin
    Participant

    CT Lawyer

    Im sorry for the distress you are going through.
    there arent many geriatricians, and even less gerontologists. which is likely why you are having trouble. if R”L she needed an orthopedist I doubt the wait would be that long. And more to my point, if a medicare patient needs an orthopedist I dotn think the wait is longer than for a privately insured patient

    Your example highlights just how broken our system is. Obviously I dont know the specifics of your situation. But Seeing a gerontologist is (almost) never medically urgent. I understand that there are bureaucratic hurdles to get equipment that she needs for which she needs to be evaluated. But that just highlights how fractured our system is. why does a pateitn need a physician to determine she needs a walker or commode, a Physical therapist should be able to make that detemriniation?

    At any rate, why not have her see an internist who certainly can make that detemriniation. while you wait for appointment with geriatrician?

    #1330610
    Joseph
    Participant

    The US has the best doctors, the best hospitals with the best doctors and medical equipment.

    #1330688
    ubiquitin
    Participant

    “The US has the best doctors, the best hospitals with the best doctors and medical equipment.”

    Again what does that mean? What is the point of the “best doctors..” If we arent living longer.

    IF I tried to market to you a new cure for colon cancer.” ITs the absolute best !” I insist
    The first thing you would ask me, ok are patients living longer? ” oh well no,”
    you might go on to ask ok less side effects? “Nope, just the opposite”

    Is it cheaper?
    “No, But it is the best! ”
    You would rightly decline to stock that drug.

    You say “The best doctors”
    in what way best bedside manner?
    In this regard we actually do pretty good (see the report I referenced) though still not the best
    Of course if by “best doctor” you mean the most in dept this is correct though not usually considered a marker of “best doctor”

    “The best hospitals?”
    again in what way? Least preventable errors? no in that regard we among the worst

    #1330703
    ubiquitin
    Participant

    Jospeh

    There are specific things we are good at. for example mortality after stroke or Heart attack are the lowest.
    I’m not saying we are the worst in Every regard.
    I dont think these specific benchmarks, that we do excell at, translates to “best health care”

    #1330706
    CTLAWYER
    Participant

    @Ubiquitin
    Anthem Bluecare which is her Medicare and wraparound refused the order for DME made by #1 Internist, #2 Oncologist #3 Physical Therapist (paid for by Anthem Bluecare. They insist on the evaluation by the Gerentologist.
    A wheelchair require specific face to face notes from the evaluating doctor, not just an Rx.

    None of the insurance pays for things such as shower chairs. The insurers will pay for 6 weeks of 1 hour per visit twice weekly home health aides. Once she is evaluated, she’ll get 9 hours oper day 7 days per week

    #1330709
    Joseph
    Participant

    Which other countries have a plethora of hospitals to compete with the likes of the Mayo Clinic, the Cleveland Clinic, Massachusetts General, Johns Hopkins, UCLA Medical, New York-Presbyterian, Columbia, Cornell, NYU, etc?

    #1330722
    Joseph
    Participant

    CTL, can’t you pay for the services privately until it is approved?

    #1330760
    ubiquitin
    Participant

    “Which β€œwe” aren’t living longer?, You’re using statistics taking into account drug dealer and other black on black criminal violence.”

    thats partly true. Though they are US citizens too.
    however even for US whites the life expectancy is 78.9 Yrs is lower than most developed countries

    “Which other countries have a plethora of hospitals to compete…”
    Please try to avoid vagaries.

    Again compete regarding what Not many think of Bellevue as a “best hospital” yet for trauma they are the msot advanced (there is a reason why it is Bellevue and not Cornell that has an OR on standby when the President is in town).
    For a bad burn r”l skip Bellevue and go to Jacobi or State Island University hospital. I cant help but notice that none of these hospitals are on your list of the “best” that you listed.
    Of course it is possible that when you take everything together those hospitals are “the best” given a composite of bench marks but you cant judge a basket of apples based on the best apples. We have to look at the overall system. I will grant that it is possible that our “best hospitals” (as judged by outcome, etc) are the better than other countries.
    Nonetheless our infant mortality is the highest (and you cant blame this on black on black crime)
    our mortality ammenable to healthcare is (by far!) the highest
    Ill accept the possibility that those hospitals have better infant mortality than the World average, that dosnt chaneg the fact that AS A WHOLE we do worse.

    CTL
    I didn’t mean she should get one from Physical therapist. I meant she should be able to ie it is a systemic problem that we have so mcuh red tape to get people the care they need.

    Again I dont know the specifics. But As an Internist in NY I have ordered many walkers and commodes (though not wheelchairs) I wasnt aware that Medicare varied by state.

    #1368016
    jakob
    Participant

    bump

    #1368021
    huju
    Participant

    To the opening poster: Would you please explain the meaning of this portion of your comment: “the current obamacare which offers more coverage but is democrats & might not be the best versus trumpmcare that might not cover enough for the middle class frum family.”

    In particular, what do you mean when you say Obamacare “offers more coverage BUT IS DEMOCRATS.” If you want more coverage, and you know that Obamacare offers more coverage, what is the relevance of the political party that gave more votes in Congress for Obamacare?

    Re CTL’s comment: Yes, the proper name of Obamacare is Affordable Care Act, or ACA. Republicans started calling it “Obamacare” because they thought it would stigmatize the proposal before it was enacted. But the Obama name has stuck and will wind up as a tribute to the man that so many Republicans vilify. I’m OK with that.

    #1368025
    CTLAWYER
    Participant

    On August 2nd I posted about the delay in seeing a specialist experienced by my MIL. There was a FIVE MONTH wait to see a gerontologist. Her Blue Cross/ Blue Shield Medicare combination would not ok durable medical equipment until prescribed by the specialist. They had rejected orders from her Oncologist and Internist.
    The EARLIEST appointment she could get was for September 25th.

    Joseph asked if I could pay for the equipment from my own pocket while I was waiting for the approvals. The answer is that I went to our garage and brought in walker, wheelchair and commode that had belonged to my late mother. They were collapsible and we held on to them.

    On August 16th while at Chemotheraphy, she was sent to the hospital for a week’s stay. She was released to a rehab facility and was there 23 days. Medicare and Blue Cross decided she was not making enough rehab progress to warrant the cost of care and we were give one night’s notice to bring her home. There were no private pay beds available.

    MIL was brought home last Sunday morning and we arranged care in our home.

    On Wednesday morning Sept. 20 the Gerontologists office called to cancel the appointment. He had decided to take a long weekend including Yuntif and we were told to call on the 26th to attempt to book a new appointment.

    It didn’t matter……………………………
    10:32 that night while our family was at the Rosh HaShanah dinner table, my wife and I and a private duty nurse were in my wonderful MIL’s room as she drew her last breath.

    The levayah is this morning……………………..all of her family was already here for Yuntif anyway. This will be forever etched in our memories as the worst RH of our lives.

    #1368032

    Our hearts go out to you and Mrs CTL. Hashem should give you strength and comfort you Χ‘ΧͺΧ•Χš שאר ΧΧ‘ΧœΧ™ Χ¦Χ™Χ•ΧŸ Χ•Χ™Χ¨Χ•Χ©ΧœΧ™Χ

    #1368089
    ubiquitin
    Participant

    CTL
    Baruch Dayan Haemes
    Im sorry for your family’s loss

    #1368128
    jakob
    Participant

    CTL
    BDE to you MIL
    May her neshama have ana aliya

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