Gasoline Prices

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  • #1740228

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Before gasoline costs there was the cost of feeding horses, donkeys, and camel.

    Did the prices of hay or whatever food horses, donkeys, and camel fluctuate by the day of the week, year, and due to political actions similar to the fluctuations of gasoline prices today?

    #1740549

    iacisrmma
    Participant

    I don’t have first hand knowledge but farmers grew their own crops and fed their livestock from that. Weather (drought or very heavy rains) had more to do with the price of feed than geopolitical concerns.

    #1740552

    Joseph
    Participant

    Yes. Not as frequently as daily (oil fluctuates in price every millisecond), but they did fluctuate in price over time due to the factors you cited.

    #1741247

    Amil Zola
    Participant

    Even today the cost of hay/alfalfa/timothy varies. I live in an area with lots of agriculture and hay grown for export as well as domestic use. Because of growing conditions farmers will be able to cut hay at least 3 times this season, perhaps even four. That will put more hay on the market for export but keep domestic prices at reasonable rates. Right now alfalfa is about $200 per ton, hay up to $280 per ton. Hay is a commodity and prices will also vary as to region.

    #1741372

    lakewhut
    Participant

    Supply and demand always existed

    #1741377

    Neville ChaimBerlin
    Participant

    The cost of Timothy?

    #1741378

    akuperma
    Participant

    Prices varied but usually the animal fodder was produced locally so they would reflect local problems. When there was a local disruption (such as a crop failure, or a war), one could always eat the animals.

    #1741527

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Timothy grass, guessing

    #1741654

    Timothy is a type of Hay.

    #1741680

    Amil Zola
    Participant

    Neville, timothy prices are low locally, this week they’re about $180 a ton. Akuperma, you are correct, but today vast quantities of hay, grass and straw are exported to China, Japan, Korea and SE Asia as well as some parts of the Middle East. It’s a far more lucrative market than local regional sales in some areas.

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