Girls' Names

Home Forums Simchas Girls' Names

Viewing 50 posts - 1 through 50 (of 74 total)
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  • #608927
    yanki613
    Member

    Does anyone know of any nice girl names that aren’t that common my wife and i would appreciate some ideas

    #948035
    afsher
    Participant

    Yitty

    #948036
    🐵 ⌨ Gamanit
    Participant

    Bat-El, Sapir, Chaviva, Ahuva, Atara… how many choices do you want?

    #948037
    yaakov doe
    Participant

    Sprintza, Yenta, Slava

    #948038
    yanki613
    Member

    thanks any more chaviva and ahuva are used already by my nieces

    #948039
    gavra_at_work
    Participant

    NiLi, BaKol, Tirtza, Na’ama, Timmima

    Can you narrow it down a little?

    #948040
    yanki613
    Member

    anything from nach? i also have a niece timmima! do u guys like gila?

    #948041
    🐵 ⌨ Gamanit
    Participant

    If you want names from tanach that I’ve never heard anyone give: Bilhah, Zilpah, Chuldah, and Ritzpah. The last is only if you want her teased for the rest of her life.

    #948042
    gavra_at_work
    Participant

    Gila, Rena, Ditza, Chedva, Ahava, Achva, Shalomit & Reut?

    Yael, Michal, Serach, Chulda, Devorah.

    BasSheva is very common, especially due to the Rebbitzen. How about Rus (Used to be common, but I don’t think it is now)?

    #948043
    akuperma
    Participant

    Baruch ha-Shem when we live at a time when people have too many children and not enough distinctive names, and have run out of deceased relatives to name people after. I bet that 65 years ago it was easy to come up with distinctive names.

    #948044
    simcha613
    Participant

    Tehila, Menucha, Shalva

    #948045
    writersoul
    Member

    Putting BaKol and Tirza on the same “unusual names” line is pretty interesting… not really the same league :). I know plenty of Tirzas and I’ve never met a BaKol.

    Nili is an acronym for Netzach Yisrael Lo Yeshaker, which is a beautiful sentiment, but if you’re Zionist it has an added significance of being the name of an underground Zionist movement in WWI (and if you’re not you may want to avoid it for that same reason). I love the name, probably wouldn’t actually use it, but that’s just me.

    Just names I love off the top of my head: Avital, Moriah, Shalhevet, Ayala, Orli, Shlomit, Michal (not really uncommon though)

    #948046
    essy8
    Member

    Emunah, Bas-tzion, tziona, tikvah, na’ava, bruriah

    #948047
    golfer
    Participant

    Machsheffa

    #948048
    writersoul
    Member

    And Gamanit, I could see all of those names being teased, though admittedly Ritzpah the most.

    And I applaud you for remembering that one- I sure didn’t :).

    Tanach question for people who aren’t as smart as Gamanit: Who was Ritzpah?

    #948049
    gavra_at_work
    Participant

    Machsheffa

    That is already the name (or at least the nickname) of his Mother In-Law (Had to get that one in 🙂

    #948050
    🐵 ⌨ Gamanit
    Participant

    Michal, Tzila, Ada.

    #948051
    on the ball
    Participant

    Merav

    #948052
    SaysMe
    Member

    rina, batya, eden, shira, talya, yehudis, yocheved….

    You know, there are jewish name books. Check out your local judaica store

    #948053
    bp27
    Participant

    What’s wrong with nice regular Jewish names, like Gittel, Golda, Hinda, Raizel, Fraida, Blima, Faiga, etc?

    Where do you all find such strange names?

    #948054
    🐵 ⌨ Gamanit
    Participant

    bp27- totally. I mean, what’s wrong with Yenta, Peshel, Shprintza, Genendel, Genesha… such nice yiddish names.

    #948055
    yanki613
    Member

    bp27 those are all yiddish names frankly they are stranger then the regular names

    #948056
    yanki613
    Member

    thanks e/o for your input i created a list from the best responses and i will put them across to my wife

    #948057
    just my hapence
    Participant

    Bruria is a good name…

    #948058
    twisted
    Participant

    From nach? Hatzlalponi, Achsa, Eglah, Hefziba, Shlomzion, Hulda

    #948059
    gavra_at_work
    Participant

    If you want names from tanach that I’ve never heard anyone give: Bilhah, Zilpah, Chuldah, and Ritzpah. The last is only if you want her teased for the rest of her life.

    I know a Bilhah.

    #948060
    🐵 ⌨ Gamanit
    Participant

    I bet you don’t know any Ritzpah’s though. How the original Ritzpah survived with such a name I don’t understand… Yeah, I know she was named after the other meaning but even so it’s a strange name.

    #948061
    OneOfMany
    Participant

    I know a Genesha. I think it’s a nice name (though I might be biased because I like the person :P).

    #948062
    bp27
    Participant

    yanki613 – I’m sorry to hear that you think that traditional jewish names are strange. They are fairly common names where I come from.

    Chaviva and Ahuva are much stranger names to me.

    #948063
    writersoul
    Member

    bp27: Because not everyone likes those names.

    It’s a taste issue.

    #948064
    🐵 ⌨ Gamanit
    Participant

    bp27- I realize now that you weren’t joking. I’m sorry if I offended you.

    OneOfMany- I know a Genendy and I think it’s a cute name because she is cute. The same with Shprintzy and Yenty. I do know that most people don’t like these names though.

    #948065
    bp27
    Participant

    writesoul – It is not a taste issue. Frankly, I think its an anti-Yiddish issue. For hundreds of years these were the standard names for girls. Now everyone feels the need for “Hebrew” names, and convert all the Fraidas to Aliza, Gittel to Tova, Golda to Zahava, etc. or, to use names from Tanach that no one used for 3000 years.

    You think that our great grandparents didn’t know the names from Tanach? Ask anyone over 70 if they new anyone growing up named Michal, Yael, or Avigayil.

    #948066
    SaysMe
    Member

    i know a genendel and a shprintza and a yentel. And yentel is a cutie! Though she does goes by her second name 🙂

    #948067
    🐵 ⌨ Gamanit
    Participant

    bp27- It actually used to be that everyone was given both the yiddish name and the hebrew equivalency, e.g. Shoshana Raizel, Tova Gittel, etc. Then the girl was called by the yiddish name only. People naming after their grandparents forgot that they ever had the hebrew name to begin with and named only the yiddish name. You don’t see this trend until about 150/200 years ago that this happened by really frum people. That’s not a very long time.

    #948068
    writersoul
    Member

    bp27: My cousin was named after my grandfather’s stepmother whose name was Tehilla. She lived most of her life in pre-Holocaust Poland. You’d be surprised at how many people had non-Yiddish names.

    If now people were starting to commonly name their kids names out of the gemara or something, like Nehorai or Huna, then okay, maybe I could see your argument. At least when we use Yiddish names, we’re usually naming after people. But Hebrew names (at least from lashon Hakodesh) shouldn’t go out of style or be a fad. They’re eternal. In the end, yes, maybe Yiddish names will die down. DO people still call their sons Adda and Ravina? It was perfectly common in Bavel. DO people still, as a matter of course, call their kids Astera and Regina, which are perfectly accepted names in Ladino, a language used by thousands upon thousands for hundreds of years? What is the essential difference between these and Yiddish?

    By me, though, and by most people I know, it’s a taste issue. You can ask why I don’t like Yiddish names, and I’ll tell you I like some, but I like the sound of other names better. It just happens to be.

    #948069
    WIY
    Member

    yanki613

    I would suggest and recommend that you choose a name from no longer living ancestor of yours or the name of a person that you knew who was special.

    #948070
    squeak
    Participant

    How about a nice Russian name, like BGWJJILLIGKKK. Powerful, unique. The only trick is learning how to pronounce the name and outlive it.

    #948071
    147
    Participant

    I would suggest and recommend that you choose a name from no longer living ancestor of yours or the name of a person that you knew who was special.

    Yet even better:- Name after a living anscestor as per the Sephardi & Dutch Ashkenazi Minhog, and the 2 namesakes should grow from eachother in tranquility for many decades.

    #948072
    TheGoq
    Participant

    BGWJJILLIGKKK

    Pronouncing it is easy the second j is silent duh!

    #948073

    Why are Yiddish names intrinsically special or holy? I speak and understand yiddish fairly well but it’s definitely not my native tongue. However, I pray and learn in hebrew (and aramaic.) Therefore, hebrew names are a lot more meaningful to me. If I still spoke yiddish as a first language or even learned chumash in yiddish, I would name a future child in it but not speaking yiddish, its absurd.

    #948074

    Actually, I do know women named Regina, Bilhah, Zilpah, and Bruriah. However, I do still think they’re quite uncommon. I also really like the names Batel, Yael, and Orly. I am quite the Israeli (or Israeli wannabe o.O) though.

    #948075

    Golamah

    #948076
    ShalomToYou
    Member

    Many young parents do not realize what an awesome responsibility they carry.

    A Jewish name is not just something to call the person. It’s the very essence of the Neshoma.

    Whatever you do be sure to ask a Rav or Rebbe, who knows these things, about the name. Giving the wrong name to a child can ruin their life.

    It’s preferable to name after an ancestor. If you don’t have, ask before you give whatever name strikes your fancy.

    Giving a name is not a joke. I’ts very serious business. One of the Tzadikim of the last generation often said when people came to him with the name of a choleh “If only they had come to me to ask what name to give”

    #948077

    Aliya. My cousin is named aliya. gourgeous name. Also Rus is still common. Another cousin is Avia. (Not aviva.) also gorgeous. My sister is Mikaella.

    #948078
    notasheep
    Member

    How about Mazal? Also, I know Esther is fairly common but it has a nice meaning that not many people know – according to the medrash Esther was a Persian name meaning ‘star’ (and I am biased anyway, my daughter is Esther)

    #948079
    just my hapence
    Participant

    notasheep – Esther is the Persian name for the planet Venus (Istahar), as quoted in the Gemoro (Maseches Megilla) not the medrash.

    #948080
    #948081
    notasheep
    Member

    Ok, so source wrong but info right, since in the ancient world planets were also called stars, this particular one being named after a Persian goddess. And you know that I knew that.

    #948082
    sharp
    Member

    Serach. As in Serach Bas Asher.

    #948083
    🐵 ⌨ Gamanit
    Participant

    yanki613- what did you end up choosing? Make sure to let us know…

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