Kitniyos

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  • #591474
    lesschumras
    Participant

    I’m curious what people have done when ad aughter married a Sfardi

    and switched to her husbands minhag

    #1105381
    volvie
    Member

    A wife always must switch to her husbands minhugim.

    As far as accommodating her new minhugim, perhaps someone with experiance can relate.

    #1105382

    She’s lucky! she can eat rice and all that other good stuff 😉 What do you mean ‘what people have done?’

    #1105383
    mybat
    Member

    The problem is when a sephardic girl marries an ashkenaz guy! She can’t eat rice or anything anymore!! 🙂

    #1105385
    Feif Un
    Participant

    I assume that if the children come to visit the parents, they’d avoid kitniyos for the time they spend there. In their own home, they could do what they want.

    #1105387
    Yanky55
    Participant

    Whow Cantor! Even I, the MO YU guy would never say that something the Rema assured is a silly practice.

    There may be many reasons to do away with it but if the Rema assured it, then we(Ashkenazim) need to stick with it.

    #1105388
    SJSinNYC
    Member

    “A wife always must switch to her husbands minhugim.”

    There are times when this isn’t true. I honestly don’t know where to find the halachic sources for this though. Its generally true.

    In general, the people I know who married geirim took on their wife’s minhagim because they had no real established ones.

    Now as to the OP: if you are talking about eating at their house? What my aunt does is that they cook kitniyot in specific pots and she doesn’t eat those dishes. Kitniyot is NOT like chametz. In fact, infant formula is kitniyot and we were told to just wash bottles in different sinks from eating.

    #1105389
    Feif Un
    Participant

    SJS, I agree – it isn’t always true.

    My family does not eat gebrokts, and my wife’s family does. I was informed that my father-in-law is makpid to eat gebrokts, because the Gra held if you didn’t, you were missing on simchas yom tov. I asked a Rav what to do, as I was going to them for Pesach the year after I got married. He told me no problem, you just switch your minhag, and that’s it. So, I took my wife’s minhag on myself.

    #1105390
    bpt
    Participant

    Think the sfardim are “lucky” they can eat rice? Consider this: before the rice goes into the pot, EACH GRAIN needs to be checked 3 times. So if you’re cooking for a family 6, figure on 4 cups of rice per meal. Know how many grains of rice are in a cup? Lots.

    Plus they need to say selichos all of Elul (instead of just the 7-10 days us ashkenaizim get away with

    #1105391
    bpt
    Participant

    And cantor, your comment goes unanswered. Sorry

    #1105392
    charliehall
    Participant

    We just ate a very nice rice and lentils lunch on our kosher for Pesach kelim. Yes, we are Ashkenazic and we did this with the full support of my rabbi. We do this in part to remind ourselves that kitniyot are NOT chametz; the prohibition of kitniyot is an Ashkenazic minhag, not halachah; only applies to *eating* kitniyot on Pesach itself, not to owning it or benefitting from it, and does NOT make your kelim non-Pesadick. If we ever have a Sefardic guest during the Yom Tov we will cook a kitniyot dish for him/her even though we cannot eat it ourselves.

    #1105393
    Yanky55
    Participant

    Maybe someone can explain to me why those who are machmir on this, eat it on the last day of Pesach? Chazal were very careful not to differentiate Yom Tov Sheini from day one. Here you are making a very clear statement that the last day is “only mi’dirabonon.

    #1105394
    qaws
    Member

    I have a question – people who are makpid on not eating gebrokts, eat gebrokts on the last day. Why do these people not eat gebrokts the first 7 days? Because they are worried that there might be some uncooked flour and if it has contact with water, it will possibly make it chametz. So on the 8th day when they eat gebrokts, they are essentially making their pots chametz. How can they use those same pots for pesach the next year – chametz was cooked in the pot less then a year before!

    #1105395
    haifagirl
    Participant

    When a friend of mine got engaged to a Sefardi she asked our rabbi about having me over on Pesach and he said she should keep one or two pots separate for non-kitniyos.

    #1105398
    koma
    Member

    There have been de’os that took expansive views of the minhag, such as the Aruch Hashulcha saying “rice and beans and `anything else in the world”, and there is the school of Havu delo losif aley. Even the Rema (sourced to Maharil) lists some spice seeds as exempt. From the latter view, you can exclude from the issur anything native to the Americas, which were not known at the time of the gezerah. As an Askenazi in EY the choices of oil, l’mashal, are the non kitniyot olive, nut, and palm, all rather pricey, and the palm of questional health. The reasonably priced stuff is corn, soybean canola and sunflower. Corn and sunflower is native American. I use sunflower, and would use corn if I lived less in fear of my wife and other wagging tongues. There are also indications that the original parameter was dried kitniyot cooked into porrige, and that in the green state, there was no issur, such as fresh green peas, green beans, and say, CORN ON THE COB. Lastly, and this is perhaps exportable to the What to East on Pesach thread, Reb Moshe ztg”l ridiculed the inclusion of peanuts, and peanut oil was marketed by Rokeach in the 60s. Peanut butter (home made) and jelly on machine matzo is a real comfort food.

    #1105399
    cherrybim
    Participant

    cantoresq – “Although the Gemara concludes that wet matzah is allowed on Pesach and Rashi confirms that p’sak, there are those who wish to be machmir based on those Talmudic opinions that asser the practice. Kitniyot however is much different. This was not a rabbinic injunction of any sort. Rather it was the invention of the foolishly pious. “

    EDITED

    #1105400
    cantoresq
    Member

    Why are my posts constantly deleted? I’m starting to feel very unwelcome in these parts.

    Kitniyot …..was the invention of the foolishly pious.

    the hoary old custom

    It’s high time that Ashkenazim abandoned this silly practice of not eating Kitniyot on Pesach

    Yes, almost all your posts are deleted. I don’t want to give the specific reasons so as not to embarrass you. The readers can decide for themselves.

    #1105401
    Yanky55
    Participant

    I think you know. When you write that something the Rema assurs is “silly”, even I would delete it…..Doesn’t matter how many years ago the Rema wrote it, btw.

    #1105404
    Josh31
    Participant

    Some things are Fait Accompli.

    However, if you are a girl and can’t do without kitniot for 8 days, you tell the Shadchan (matchmaker) – “Sephardi”.

    #1105405
    hello99
    Participant

    I have heard from a respected Sefardi Rav involved in Kashrus that the reason behind kitniyos are as relevant today as ever. He told me he has inspected a number of factories producing Pesach Soybean oil and found numerous grains of wheat in each facility. In his opinion even Sefardim may not use soy oil on Pesach.

    #1105406
    mw13
    Participant

    I have heard from a respected Sefardi Rav involved in Kashrus that the reason behind kitniyos are as relevant today as ever. He told me he has inspected a number of factories producing Pesach Soybean oil and found numerous grains of wheat in each facility. In his opinion even Sefardim may not use soy oil on Pesach.

    From the back of a recently purchased box of Cheerios, reprinted without permission:

    “SAME CHEERIOS, simply, GLUTEN FREE

    The taste you love has always come with oats that are naturally gluten free. We’re simply making sure they stay that way.

    IT STARTS with FAMILY

    When Phil, a member of the Cheerios team for over 50 years, found out that his daughter-in-law couldn’t eat gluten, he knew his team had to find a way to make sure every family, including his, could share breakfast together. Since oats are naturally gluten free, the only problem was finding a way to make sure they didn’t get mixed up with anything else.

    THE JOURNEY from FIELD to BOWL

    Most of the farmers who grow oats for Cheerios also grow wheat and barley, which aren’t gluten free. Sometimes, those grains get mixed together in the fields or on the farm, so, to make Cheerios gluten free, we had to separate them. It took a lot of late nights and hard work, but we finally discovered a way to sort the other grains out of our oats.”

    #1105407
    charliehall
    Participant

    How is the most recent post by mw13 relevant? Ashkenazim consider oats to be one of the five grains based on Rashi. I have personally eaten oat matzah.

    #1105408
    ☕ DaasYochid ☕
    Participant

    Cross-contamination.

    #1105409
    One Liner
    Member

    Wow we’re starting early this year.

    #1105410
    golfer
    Participant

    I noticed, one liner.

    What? They want me to start cleaning already? In Cheshvan?

    I haven’t even polished the Menorah yet…

    #1105411
    One Liner
    Member

    Now that’s pushing it… 🙂

    #1105412
    Mammele
    Participant

    Golfer: IIRC per Rabbi Abraham Twerski it’s almost time to start your Borsht. Okay, maybe you have till Chanukah. Not that I’d know how to. Maybe PBA can put his fermenting skills to good use…

    No wonder we complain that there’s nothing to eat on Pesach. We’re missing out on the real stuff our grandparents ate…

    #1105413
    mw13
    Participant

    DY nailed it. This shows that cross-contamination is not just a problem that affected ancient societies; it still happens today.

    The reason I posted this now is because Cheerios posted it now. And also, this way it will be waiting here in five months when this topic comes up all over again.

    #PreemptiveStrike

    #1105414
    fathousewife
    Participant

    not every sfardi eats kitniyos; my poor sis DOESNT eat kitniyos, or gebrokts on achron, or Chicken all of pesach,

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