Making Aliyah as a student?

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  • #613167

    rastacourage
    Member

    I’ve been thinking about earning my Master’s abroad, and at first I was more targeted towards Europe, because education can be cheaper there. Then I found out about Aliyah and all the benefits they give you. I am a Jewish American, and am considering making Aliyah, to be blunt, for cheaper education…although that is NOT my only reason, just a big motivator.

    However, I am in love with the country, but I do not want to stay there forever. I am intrigued by the culture, living in a place that is in war, and well, it’s beautiful no matter where you go. But this would be, at least as of right now, a temporary thing. And a school, the Arava Institute, seems like the perfect place for me and how I want to study.

    I wanted to get advice from people about the process. If I am missing a catch, if I am making a stupid decision. I understand this reason isn’t exactly the most ethical or the point of making Aliyah. But is it wrong to consider this? Any suggestions/advice/considerations would be extremely helpful.

    #1023100

    Patur Aval Assur
    Participant

    When R’ Yochanan was told that there are old people in Bavel he was astounded because ???? ???? ????? ???? ????? ?? ????? ???? ??? ????? ???? ?? until they told him that the old people had a specific zechus of ????? ?????? ??? ?????? (Berachos 8a). So if you want long life it’s a great place to live.

    #1023101

    pixelate
    Member

    @rastacourage

    Someone once asked Rav Avigdor Miller why doesn’t everyone make Aliya to have the mitzvah of yishuv E”Y, and since it’s the optimal place for a Jew to live for all mitzvos. He answered that although in theory it is correct, every other aspect of jewish life must be taken into effect, ex. maintaining a high level of torah life in the diaspora.

    If you know what you want to do and you want do it and make aliya, then go for it. Living there is optimum. (unless you’re a satmar chassid)

    If you have compromising circumstances, and a mitigated zeal to make aliya, there is no reason to move for the sake of it, since Judaism isn’t about one singular mitzvah, but living a torah life as a whole.

    ?????? ???? ??? ???? ??? ?? – ??? ????? ?? ???? ????? ??????

    ?????? ??

    Whether you were born there, or just hope to be there, you’re considered a native of E”Y.

    But from the mood of your question, I’d say go for it.

    #1023102

    takahmamash
    Participant

    If you’re of average student age, don’t forget that if you make aliyah you may be expected to go into the IDF at some point, possibly up to three years (depending on your age and gender). You’ll also be expected to do miluim. I’m not trying to discourage you, but it’s important to keep that in mind.

    Have you spoken to your local shaliach and/or NbN about your thoughts?

    #1023103

    Don’t worry, so far around 500 rockets have his us this past week, and no one has died, only 2 non-severe injuries. Meanwhile at least 50 people in gaza have died from our rockets, which was less…

    Hashem watches over Israel, and it’s cool watching iron dome blow the rockets up from my porch ๐Ÿ™‚ even though sorta scary…

    #1023104

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    Did you say you WANT to live in a place because it is at war?

    That is very disturbing.

    #1023105

    Hey, why not? It’;s at the top of my list for a place when I get married…

    #1023106

    If you aren’t planning to live there permanently, it would be stealing to make aliyah for the benefits knowing you are going to leave.

    #1023107

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    jf: Is that their policy? Do they require you to “intend” to stay permanently? If I was them, I would encourage people to come intending to leave, on the assumption that many would stay.

    #1023108

    I’m sorry but that is just nonsense. Of course you have to intend to stay permanently. That is the definition of aliyah. Aliyah means settling permanently in Israel and an oleh is an immigrant. No conscientious person could in good faith go through the legal process of immigration to Israel, taking advantage of government-funded resources and benefits along the way, just to get a degree and then leave. Just because you would be willing to play that kind of Russian roulette doesn’t mean you can assume that the government is willing. And by the way, even if they don’t have that policy in writing, it’s still wrong.

    #1023109

    pixelate
    Member

    @jewishfeminist02

    no one really knows for sure that they’re staying forever, and that’s part of making aliyah. if you are intent on returning and playing around with the government, I hear you. But if you may stay it’s not your requirement to commit forever before you make aliya.

    Most people who sign up stay, some come back. I know people who made aliya hoping to work things out, but moved back due to financial worries. It’s not playing the system at all.

    If you ever experienced trying to get something done in an Israeli government office, you wouldn’t have this back-bending sympathy. They have a round robin of recriminations that would make the 3 stooges proud.

    #1023110

    yytz
    Participant

    Sure, if you really intend to make aliyah just for the free education, and then leave right afterward and never come back (and thus never do your army or national service), then there’s something dishonest about that. If you really never come back, then in your case, Israel has gained nothing (besides your consumer spending when you were there, I suppose.)

    But in practice, I bet Israel would love it if a lot of people did that. The more Jews who are Israeli citizens, the better, since they can always come back. Someone who made aliyah only briefly is still much likely to stay forever, or to come back permanently one day, than someone who never did. For example, they know there’s a good chance that while you’re there, you’ll fall in love with an Israeli, get a good job offer, or get swept up in Israeli patriotism or whatever, and end up staying despite your initial plans.

    Also, if you have an open mind, and think that you might stay in Israel long term, or might not, depending on how things go, then I wouldn’t see making aliyah as wrong or dishonest in the slightest (even if it’s motivated to a large extent by the lower tuition). Lots of olim come back. That’s normal nowadays, and a lot of them probably knew that if they couldn’t find a job or had other troubles they would end up going back.

    #1023111

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    But in practice, I bet Israel would love it if a lot of people did that. The more Jews who are Israeli citizens, the better, since they can always come back. Someone who made aliyah only briefly is still much likely to stay forever, or to come back permanently one day, than someone who never did. For example, they know there’s a good chance that while you’re there, you’ll fall in love with an Israeli, get a good job offer, or get swept up in Israeli patriotism or whatever, and end up staying despite your initial plans.

    Also, if you have an open mind, and think that you might stay in Israel long term, or might not, depending on how things go, then I wouldn’t see making aliyah as wrong or dishonest in the slightest (even if it’s motivated to a large extent by the lower tuition). Lots of olim come back. That’s normal nowadays, and a lot of them probably knew that if they couldn’t find a job or had other troubles they would end up going back.

    This.

    The same reason Key Food doesn’t mind if you come in just to buy the 99 cent ice cream. Because 9/10 people who do will also end up buying something else.

    #1023112

    OP said “I am in love with the country, but I do not want to stay there forever…this would be, at least as of right now, a temporary thing.”

    That is not at all the same thing as making aliyah in good faith, really committing to settling there but understanding that you may have to come back if it doesn’t work out.

    #1023113

    rebelpen10
    Member

    I’m living here in Jerusalem as a newly Aliyah-d student earning my Bachelor’s degree. Just wanted to say, do your research before. Aliyah tuition benefits are only given if you attend an israeli uni or michlala program, where classes are taught in Hebrew. (maybe you are fluent, I dont know). If you do an american program, you may get very little or no money at all.

    As for the moral side of things, like someone here wrote, you never know what’ll happen in life. If you’re committing to stay for the 4 years it takes to get your degree, I think it’s okay. Maybe I wouldn’t lead with that when you go to NBN…

    #1023114

    If you feel like you have something to hide from Nefesh b’Nefesh, isn’t that a sign that something’s not right?

    #1023115

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    That’s a fair point. You should tell Nefesh b’nefesh your intentions and be forthright.

    #1023116

    Some people plan on staying forever and for reasons it can’t happen and there rabbanim tell them to go back. It’s not for everyone.

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