Qiryat or Kiryat: Sending mail to Israel

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  • #619087

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    This Qiryat/Kiryat city has English signs in Israel.

    Seriously less than a mile from the Qiryat sign is a Kiryat sign.

    On Facebook, you can Check-In to either the Qiryat ___ or Kiryat ___. I’ve used both. However, the Qiryat city has an Default pic for the city, and looks more official.

    Then again, there are webpages for this city using both spellings.

    When I send mail to Israel, I write the address in English. Which one is preferable please?

    Thank you!

    #1218826

    Mammele
    Participant

    Try google Maps to see how the address shows up.

    #1218827

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Thanks Mammele: It is a K.

    Maybe people from other countries spell it with a Q?

    I am going to keep spelling it with a K then.

    I didn’t think of that, but if someone at the PO doesn’t know, they can Google it with the zip code and get it in Hebrew or English, etc.

    Thanks again!

    #1218828

    Geordie613
    Participant

    Both are valid. NB. If it’s Kiryat/Qiryat Sefer, the city’s official name is Modi’in Illit.

    #1218829

    Joseph
    Participant

    Using Q instead of K is more typically done by academic-types that feel compelled to stand out differently than the average man, thinking it enhances their appearance as an educated fellow.

    #1218830

    Lilmod Ulelamaid
    Participant

    or maybe it’s more correct and that’s why they do it.

    I recall a story in “My uncle, the Netziv” about how someone (maybe the Netziv?) corrected someone (probably the Torah Temima) for the way he addressed a letter. Even though it was not technically correct, it was clear what he meant and it would have gotten there anyways, but the Netziv (if that’s who it was) felt that it is important to do things correctly.

    Waiting now for Joseph to respond that it was put in “cheirem”. My response to that is that I don’t think it’s relevant since I don’t think that story is the reason it was put in cheirem.

    #1218831

    takahmamash
    Participant

    Why not write the address in Hebrew? As long as you write “Israel” in English, it will get where it needs to go.

    #1218832

    Joseph
    Participant

    lilmod, what was put in cherem?

    #1218833

    Lilmod Ulelamaid
    Participant

    The book, “My uncle the Netziv” was supposedly put in Cherem. I’m not sure what that means though or who put it in cherem. That was just what I remember hearing when it first came out in approximately 1988.

    It’s a translation of a Sefer by the Torah Temima, so it can’t really be problematic. I don’t know why it was put in cherem.

    #1218834

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Geordie613: That’s very cool! Never knew that. Thanks 🙂

    takahmamash: If you were sending something really really important* to Israel from the US, would you write everything but Israel in Hebrew?

    It’s going from America to who knows to Israel. I feel like it will be more accepted and directed if it’s in a language that at least one person hopefully in the Post Office can read.

    What if at some point, G-d forbid, Israel is scratched out or rubbed off or the packaging gets damaged, the rest of the address could look like chicken scratch to someone who doesn’t read Hebrew. Imho, chas v’shalom it could be more likely to be tossed to the side.

    *Of course very important, but it’s not something of tangible value so there is no insurance, in such a case that I am describing, for this piece of mail that comes deeply from the heart.

    …. So yes. It could go through so many hands before it’s delivery.

    Isn’t it more safe to address it in English?

    #1218835

    takahmamash
    Participant

    What if at some point, G-d forbid, Israel is scratched out or rubbed off or the packaging gets damaged, the rest of the address could look like chicken scratch to someone who doesn’t read Hebrew. Imho, chas v’shalom it could be more likely to be tossed to the side.

    What if at some point, the address could look like chicken scratch to some Israeli who doesn’t read English. Imho, especially in the Israeli Postal system, it could be more likely to be tossed to the side.

    #1218836

    Nechomah
    Participant

    The Q comes from the old British translation of the language and, to me, it makes me think of Arabic, even though there is no obvious connection. The more modern translations are with a K. I think if you spell it Kiryat …., it will get to where you want. Remember, the US Post Office people are going to simply place it in a bag of mail that is going to Israel, no matter what the street address that is on it. Only once it gets here will the Israel Post staff sort it according to the city and street. If your envelope gets damaged to the point that a whole word gets rubbed off while in transit with the USPS, then you should probably find a different way to get your mail places. You could write the letters ISRAEL in very large letters and the Hebrew ones in a regular size.

    #1218837

    Geordie613
    Participant

    I assure you the Israel Postal Service can read English better than the US PS or Royal Mail can read Hebrew. I would write everything in English with Kiryat/Qiryat/Qiriat being all equally valid spellings. Also, put Israel in large on the last line to be doubly sure.

    “but if someone at the PO doesn’t know, they can Google it with the zip code and get it in Hebrew or English” – I can’t imagine they sit there looking up zip codes on google.

    (Don’t do what a friend of mine did once and put ‘Zionist Occupied Palestine’ as the country.)

    #1218838

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Geordie613: What!? Did the mail ever get to Israel? That’s extreme and offensive to many, to say the least.

    —Will do (or actually, Will not do)! 🙂

    #1218839

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    takahmamash: You have allies! (thanks for the advice)

    From Trip Advisor…

    amm101 said, “If you know Hebrew it can help to write the address in Hebrew as well. Although English is fine writing it in Hebrew could speed it up by day once the envelope gets to Israel.”

    jon-dan said, “I’ve had dozens of letters from the USA go via an address in Illinois because of similar zip code there.

    Normally a letter should be delivered within 5-7 days.”

    …That whole zip code thing is a good point. If it’s in Hebrew, then at least the postal employees have more indications that this envelope is going to Israel.

    —At the same time, hopefully they know right away that it’s going out of the country when the envelop has a Global Forever Stamp.

    #1218840

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Nechomah: Oh! That makes sense about it coming from British English. Thanks 🙂

    #1218841

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Okay the race is on!

    Last week I mailed several cards to Israel baruch Hashem.

    At least one address had no zipcode.

    Several did have the zipcode.

    Waiting to see if any arrive significantly sooner than others.

    Please Hashem may they all arrive to the right person speedily and in one piece and well and good.

    #1218842

    Geordie613
    Participant

    LB,

    On you post from two weeks ago; Yes, surprisingly, it did.

    I have recently come across Israel Post’s website. If you google “???? ????? ???? ???? ????? ?????” you can search for any Postal code in Israel, and correct address format. I know it’s too late for you, but hopefully it will help someone else.

    #1218843

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    UPDATE from USPS Official

    Do NOT put a zip code when sending mail to Israel from the US.

    It could get lost that way, G-d forbid.

    Thanks for the posters who gave me the headsup.

    Just asked the USPS customer service representative who confirmed that one should omit Israeli zip codes.

    Thanks 🙂

    Please return to your regular programming

    #1218844

    Geordie613
    Participant

    Two points:

    Israel zip codes are ok from the UK where post codes are alpha numeric

    I love America, where Presidents and the Postal service are not afraid to talk about G-D.

    #1218845

    WinnieThePooh
    Participant

    “where Presidents and the Postal service are not afraid to talk about G-D. “

    Was that the postal service’s words or LB’s rephrasing?

    #1218846

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    I wasn’t sure what Geordie613 meant.

    The USPS person didn’t say “G-d forbid.” I added that part.

    She just said don’t do it becaus it could get lost [G-d forbid and then I told her about a card that I sent more than a month ago]

    Was that what you meant about them mentioning G-d Geordie?

    #1218847

    huju
    Participant

    You seem to be underrating the Israeli postal service. I am sure either address would work, especially if they use a zip-code-like system, which they do.

    But please help me: Kew Gardens or Cue Gardens. Or Q Gardens. Far Rockaway or Farak Away.

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