questions about davening and answering "amen"

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  • #601667

    mik5
    Participant

    Let’s say that I daven mincha early in the afternoon and later in the day, I go in a shul that davens mincha immediately prior to sundown followed by maariv. Should I answer “Boruch hu uvaruch shemo” and “Amen” during the chazzan’s repetition of the Amidah? And Kaddish? And Kedusha? And bowing during Modim?

    What should I do when the tzibur says the silent Amidah (which I already said earlier in the day)? Can I just sit? What about tachanun? What if I did not say tachanun for some reason when I prayed earlier? Does it make a differnece where I davened alone or with a minyan earlier in the afternoon?

    What if I omitted some phrases that require me to repeat the service? Can I do so with the minyan in the normal way?

    The same questions go for whenever you walk into a shul that is currently praying something you already prayed that day. For instance, this past Shabbos I davened in one shul and then walked into another (where I got an aliya). During the chazzan’s repetition of Mussaf, which the second shul davens late, I said “Boruch Hu Uvaruch Shemo” and “Amen.” I sat during the silent Amidah (if I remember correctly).

    Please discuss these questions! Thanks.

    #845029

    Sam2
    Participant

    You can answer everything. You should always answer “Amen” whenever you can. You cannot sit during Shmoneh Esrei if you are within 4 Amos (6-8 feet) of someone who is. The only prayer you have to repeat that you were already Yotzei is when a Tzibbur said Aleinu. If you forgot something and are obligated to repeat the service, why wouldn’t you?

    #845030

    WIY
    Member

    mik5

    You should answer Amein to all Brachos as well as answer to Kedusha (Nakdishach/nekadeish) as well as to Kaddish.

    If you are learning and are in another room but can hear the minyan (even other side of mechitzah) you dont have to answer. Otherwise you should answer to everything as well as say Aleinu. Tachanun is not required, if you didnt say it you may say it with this minyan.

    Did I miss anything?

    #845031

    mik5
    Participant

    thanks, WIY and sam2.

    Since I’m in the shul anyway, would it be OK if I said the silent Amidah along with everywhere else even though I was already yotzei, keeping in mind that this should be a voluntary prayer? Would it make a difference here whether I davened alone or with a minyan, since davening with a minyan is preferable? Would it make a difference whether I davened mincha gedola or during the zman of mincha ketana, which is the same zman as I would be davening the second time?

    I just don’t feel comfortable standing and pretending that I’m davening when I’m not. Can I answer half-kaddish even if I didn’t say ashrei? How can I answer kaddish if I didn’t say tachanun? And why am I required to say aleinu?

    #845032

    WIY
    Member

    mik5

    I never heard of saying a voluntary prayer in a situation where it wasnt a question of being necessary, like forgetting Yaaleh vyavo by mincha and saying 2 maarivs that night when it is no longer Rosh chodesh, or other such cases. It seems like it is only an option in such cases. In your case where you certainly Davened already I dont believe theres such a thing as Davening an extra shmoneh esrei just as a voluntary Tefillah.

    I would say ask a Rabbi.

    “I just don’t feel comfortable standing and pretending that I’m davening when I’m not.”

    Who said anything about being reuired to stand? You dont have to stand you may sit.

    “Can I answer half-kaddish even if I didn’t say ashrei?”

    You may answer to Kaddish and answering to kaddish has nothing to do with ashrei. If you walk by a Shul and from the open window you hear kaddish being recited, although you arent obligated to answer, you may respond amein and its a good thing to do so.

    “How can I answer kaddish if I didn’t say tachanun?”

    See my previous answer.

    “And why am I required to say aleinu?”

    Not sure why but I think it is because the Tefillah starts off “Aleinu Leshabeich” It is upon us (our obligation) to praise, so you dont want to show like you are taking yourself out of the group. I will see if I can find something more on the topic.

    #845033

    WIY
    Member

    bump

    #845034

    Sam2
    Participant

    Mik5: The Halachic works talk about Davening a voluntary prayer but we no longer do it as we assume we won’t have proper Kavanah. The Minchah Gedolah/Minchah Ketanah point is interesting and it is far above my place to say anything either way on that. You don’t have to pretend to Daven, you can learn from a Sefer as well (if you’re learning you can even sit down).

    #845035

    HaLeiVi
    Participant

    There is such a thing as a voluntary Tefilla, but we try not to do it since it can be Levatala if it isn’t done right. There is no need to pretend that you are Davenning. You may sit unless someone near you is Davenning Shmone Esrei, in which case you can learn standing.

    The only time you are required to pretend is if the Tzibur is saying Shema when you are holding after Barchu, in middle of a Bracha. In that case you put your hand over you eyes and say the words that you are up to, in the tune of Krias Shema, so as not to stand out as not being Mekabel Hashem’s kingdom along with Klal Yisroel.

    Aleinu is not like Kaddish and Kedusha, where the idea is to answer. Aleinu, like Krias Shema, is recited along with the Tzibur so as not to seem to disagree.

    As far as I know, you don’t say along Aleinu if you are in middle of anywhere else in Davenning, and I think even learning.

    #845036

    Sam2
    Participant

    HaLeiVi: If you’re learning you can sit. You only have to stand if you’re near someone who’s Davening and you’re doing nothing.

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