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  • #1967260
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Acharei Mos: Tainted Ideals*

    On יום הכיפורים the Kohen Gadol brings three different korbanos: one for his own personal sins, one for the sins of the entire nation, and one specifically for the sin of טומאת מקדש, allowing the בית המקדש to become impure, a sin which is attributed to the Kohanim. What is it that makes this particular sin so severe that it needs its own special atonement on יום הכיפורים?

    R’ Samson Raphael Hirsch explains that the בית המקדש is symbolic of the highest ideals of the Jewish people, of perfection itself. And so by having a מקדש in their midst, the Jewish nation proclaimed both its loyalty to pure Jewish ideals and its desire to draw closer to perfection. Despite whatever shortcomings we may have had, the ideals remained intact.

    However, once we allow the בית המקדש to become defiled, we show that we do not cherish and look up to the Jewish ideals in their purest form. We have allowed the actual way that we live our lives to water down our ideals. And once that happens, we have no ideals left to guide us and urge us to be better. We have nothing left to go back to. This is is why such a dramatic rectification is required specifically for this sin.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #1969738
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Emor: Live Life

    We know that a Kohen may not become טמא by coming into contact with a dead body. But why is that?

    R’ Shamshon Rephael Hirsch explains that in many other religions, a priest’s job only relates to death. These religions think that religion is only an explanation for where we go when we die, but not a set of instructions for how we should live our lives while we’re here.

    We believe just the opposite. Once somebody has died, it’s too late for them to change. Our religion is all about improving ourselves while we still can. The Kohanim are forbidden from dealing with the dead in order to emphasize that our religion is about life, not death.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #1969778
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    Acharei. the highest level of kedusha is still the neshama. The Chasam Sofer explains that the mishkan can not be built on shabbos but for pikuach nefesh, for saving life, shabbos is violated. The thirteen midas of Hashem are against the thirteen midas of derivatuon of the Torah, kel is qgainst a kal vechomer. What is this kal vechomer? I think when we take the wrong sefer torah out by mistake we roll, mish, as not to show it to be defective, so how we should watch not hurt a Jew who has a holy chelek alokai mimaal, heavenly neshama.

    #1969811
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    Maybe the remez is in tbe yotzer of Parashas Parah, המת בבית אינו טמא when the dead is in the house, it is not tomei יצא ממנו אותו מטמא if it left from it, makes it tomei. What is the meaning? They say it talks about a dead fetus in the mothers womb. The tomei arrives only after it left but when it is there, it is too late.

    #1971687
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Bechukosai: Just Do It

    In the middle of the frightening
    קללות that we are told will befall us if we stray from the path of Torah and mitzvos, the Parsha tells us of a positive development: וְהִתְוַדּ֤וּ אֶת־עֲוֺנָם֙, Klal Yisroel will admit to their sins. And yet, the קללות continue on after that pasuk. If we admit to the mistakes we’ve made, why don’t our troubles end there?

    The Vilna Gaon explains that admitting what you’re doing is wrong is only half the battle. Realizing your mistakes is only helpful if you correct them afterwards. It is not enough to find where we’ve fallen short of living up to our ideals; we must fix the issue if we want anything to change.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #1971693
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    The Rambam’s view is that teshuva is not the mitzva but viduy as you cannot tell a person to do teshuva if one does not realize that a mistake was made. However. once teshuva is done, a new person is born on whom the kelolas don’t apply.

    #1974344
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Bamidbar: Free For All

    The Medrash tells us that Torah is compared to a desert; just as a desert is הפקר לכל, free to all, so too the Torah is only given to one who makes themselves available to all, מי שמפקיר עצמו לכל.

    Perhaps we can suggest that this why our Parsha, which is focused on counting all of the Jews, begins with mentioning the midbar. Just like the desert is accessible to all, only somebody who is there for every single Jew can become a teacher and leader of the people.

    The Torah is not given to any one individual; Hashem promised it to the nation as a whole. The best way to ensure that Hashem gives you access to the light of the Torah is to approach learning Torah not for your individual satisfaction, but as a representative of the people.

    וכמש״כ המהר״ל באבות: ולפיכך אמר “מי שלמד על מנת ללמד, מספיקין בידו ללמוד וללמד”. כי כאשר כונתו שתהיה התורה בעולם, כאשר ראוי לפי האמת שתהיה התורה בעולם, מספיקין בידו ללמוד וללמד כפי כונתו שרצה.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #1975648
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    The Torah is compared to water which is available for free and flows from high to low to those who are humble. Emes mearetz titzmach, the truth grows from the ground, for those who lower themselves to the ground. So why don’t people find it? Said the Baal Shem Tov because keiner will sich nisht einbeigen, no one wants to bend down.

    #1978245
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Bahaloscha: Souls on Fire

    We know that when Ahron HaKohen lit the menorah, he had to light each flame until it was עולה מעלה, strong enough to rise on its own.

    R’ Moshe Feinstein points out that Kohanim were the teachers of the nation, as it says יורו משפטך ליעקב, and Ahron was the leader of the Kohanim. He suggests that we therefore learn a lesson about how to inspire the next generation from this particular halacha.

    It is not enough to educate our children to just do what they are told; one day, nobody will telling them what to do. We must inspire our children to the point that they want to what is right by themselves. We need to instill in them a passion for yiddishkeit that will continue to burn within them for their entire lives. Only when that flame is burning on its own can it continue on without us.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #1978515
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    אל מול פני המנורה יאירו שבעת הנרות explains the Chasan Sofer that the center is the Rebbi that the talmidim look to, seeing him as heavenly angel. so he stays humble by recognizing that his strength comes from the takmidim and the talmidim rely on the rebbi.

    #1981993
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Korach: Keeping the Balance

    When discussing the Terumah that must always be given to the Kohanim, the Torah refers to it as ברית מלח עולם. Why is salt used as a metaphor for the everlasting?

    Rabeinu Bachya has a fascinating explanation. He says that since salt is produced by cooking water, salt is a mixture of water and fire. So too, Hashem’s promises are eternal because they are composed of both מידת הרחמים (represented by water) and מידת הדין (fire).

    R’ Aaron Lopiansky explains that if Hashem only gave us exactly what we deserve (דין), we couldn’t survive. But if Hashem gave us everything without our deserving it, we would become spoiled instead of productive. The balance is crucial.

    A similar idea applies in our own lives. If we do what is right only out of a sense of obligation, we will eventually run out of willpower. If we do it only out of idealism and inspiration, we will eventually get disheartened. There needs to be a balance of different motivations, יראה and אהבה, for us to keep at it.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #1982006
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    The pain for sins is derived for a kol vechomer from a non-jewish servant being freed with the loss of tooth or eye. It is also derived from the fact that salt softens meat, so does pain over sins. In the first case a lot of pain must be tolerated but when compared to salt, to much salt destroys the meat. Similarly to much pain destroys. That is the meaning in mitzraim, voezkor es brisi, the covenant of salt. They have suffered already too much. so it is time for the redemption.

    #1984258
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Chukas: Just Part of the Plan

    Moshe Rabbeinu had spent the last forty years trying to lead Bnei Yisroel into Eretz Yisroel. He tried to direct them to do what was right, and was the one who dealt with the fallout when they didn’t listen. But in this parsha, Moshe gets the bad news. He will not be entering Eretz Yisroel. He will die in the desert like the rest of his generation did.

    But Moshe didn’t focus on his own disappointment at his life’s dream slipping away. The very next pasuk has Moshe back in action, trying to convince Edom to let Bnei Yisroel pass through so they could get to Eretz Yisroel without him. The plan must go on, with me or without me. My job is to do what Hashem says; what part I have to play is up to Him, not me.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #1984288
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    The holy Ohr Hachaim enumerates 10 reasons for what Moshe Rabbenu did wrong. Rashi explains that he should have not hit the rock, but why the first time he was told to hit it?
    The Daroshes HaRan explains that it is like disciplining a child who we hit the first time but the second time talk is enough and admonishment of showing the belt, stick is enough.
    However, the Malbim differentiates between a tzur, first time, having no water, to a selah, second time, which contains water. The tzur had to be hit to provide from it water. A selah has to be emptied first from water by speaking to it and then hit to gain water from it. When it was hit first, no miracle happened just water in it came out. According to the Rav Aberbenel, Aaron by tbe eigel diminished tbe emunah of the Jews and Moshe Rabbenu by the meraglim, so they needed a means to restore it. So their sin was not the mei meriva but the previous incident.

    #1984739
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    There is a intersting pshat in the sefer Peninim Yekorim. Moshe Rabbenu was the shaliach as Avraham Avunu provided water to the malochim through a shaliach, so the Jews were also given water through a shaliach. Hoewer, shechina medabers mitoch gerono, the shechina spoke through his voice, so he was unable to speak and had to hit the rock. When he became angry at them. the shechina left and now he could have spoken himself.

    #1986326
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Balak: אין הדבר תלי אלא בי

    Rashi on this week’s parsha asks the obvious question: if Bilaam was such a rasha, how did he have nevuah? Rashi answers that the reason Hashem spoke to Bilaam was just so that the nations of the world would not be able to complain that they did not have Neviim to guide them like Klal Yisroel did. So Hashem gave them a Navi, and he only made things worse.

    However, this answer is quite puzzling. The nations still seem to have a valid complaint: if we had had a Navi who wasn’t a rasha, maybe we could have been better.

    Perhaps we can suggest that the message here is a bit deeper. The nations believed that if only they had somebody with nevuah to guide them, they’d behave. But Bilaam was living proof that if somebody does not want to do what is right, not only won’t having a Navi change them, but even being a Navi won’t help them. All the guidance and heavenly intervention in the world will do nothing for somebody who does not want to be better.

    God given gifts will not change a person or a people. The only one who can change you is you.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #1986336
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    They still have an argument. By Moshe Rabbenu it says vayikra whereas by Bilaam vayikar?
    Therefore Moshe Rabbenu wrote the small aleph indicating that Bilaam could have been like him but his gaiva, haughtiness caused through his wicked behavior that the appearance of Hashem to him be beyond his control.

    #1986342
    ☕️coffee addict
    Participant

    Bilaam viewed Hashem like any other AZ, it was meant to serve himself and the only way he will get something from Hashem is if he gives what Hashem wants (karbanos) which is why he tried 3 times with karbanos

    But the reason one brings karbanos and davens isn’t supposed to be like that it’s supposed to make one close and realize that Hashem doesn’t have to do your will instead you are supposed to accept Hashem’s will and that’s done by “coming close” (הקרבה) to Hashem

    #1986470

    > Bilaam viewed Hashem like any other AZ

    Bilaam is a stickler to “halakha” – he follows Hashem in “small and big”. He just refuses to consider what Hashem actually wants. He is told “this nation is blessed”, but he is still focused on his narrow question – can he go and try to curse. He refuses to accept reality around him and tries to find terutzim to allow him do what he wants.

    #1987989
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Pinchas: Consistency is Key 🔑

    The Korban Tamid, which literally translated means “the constant Korban”, was brought twice every day in the Beis Hamikdosh. Any other Korbanos had to be brought in between the Tamid of the morning and the Tamid of the afternoon. We see how integral the role of our constant, everyday actions is. It is often easier to be excited about a rare mitzva, like a Korban Musaf. But תדיר ושאינו תדיר, תדיר קודם – the everyday mitzvos must come first.

    We all know the story of Rabbi Akiva, who was inspired to begin learning at the age of 40 by seeing a hole that had been worn into a rock by the constant dripping of water. He realized there was no magic moment that suddenly changes a person. Only by consistently doing the same thing, day in and day out, can a person change for the better.

    The Sefer HaChinuch famously tells us that אדם נפעל כפי פעולותיו, a person is changed by his actions. Even somebody who is rotten to the core – if he begins to constantly and consistently do what is right – can become great.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #1989886
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Mattos: Learn From All

    When Bnei Gad and Reuven asked Moshe if they could live on the other side of the Yarden, outside of Eretz Yisroel proper, Moshe wasn’t very happy. How can you abandon your brothers, he asked them? Bnei Gad and Reuven answered that they would stay with the rest of the nation until the entire Eretz Yisroel was conquered, and each Shevet settled their specific portion of it. We can easily understand why they were needed during the war, but what was the point of watching everyone else split up the land?

    Perhaps we can suggest that Moshe was not only worried whether the Shevatim would not help each other during war and hardship. He wanted them to be together as one people in times of peace as well. Each Shevet is a piece of the greater whole, and each has a lesson to teach the others. Only when we spend time seeing how others go about living their lives can we learn from them what we might be able to do better.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #1989929
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    Mattos, we can even learn from the bad, what not to do. We can learn mitvos from what ferver aveiros are done. Bilaam wanted a reward from his bridling of his domkey, so he was told that Avraham Avinu did that before him.

    #1989903
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    Pinchas, tosfas in Shabbos (23,2) says that todir only applies in precedence when both are done then the constant comes first but if one is done or the other, todir is not followed but publicizing the miracle. We say a yom tov shemonei esrei with shabbos rather than a shabbos shemonei esrei with yom tov. Also they must be on the same level, if one is obligatory and the other optional it is not followed, see Shagas Aryeh 27. It is like a race where one is crippled. The constant should not be done kamitzvas anoshim melumodim. done by rout.

    #1992120
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Devarim: Always Applicable*

    One of the last things that Moshe did before his death was to translate the Torah into all seventy languages for nation that he was about to leave. Why did he do this now?

    The Ksav Sofer explains that until now, Moshe was able to speak directly to Hashem whenever an issue arose. But from now on, the Jews would be on their own, and they had to learn how to lead themselves.

    By translating the Torah, Moshe was trying to emphasize that the ideals and laws of the Torah are not limited to one time period or location. Wherever you find yourself, the Torah is translatable and applicable to your situation. The Torah has all of the answers in it; you just have to look hard enough.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בו ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #1992353
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    One of the questions to us will be in the next world, kovato itim latorah and not Torah leitim, we don’t set the Torah to the times but tbe times to the Torah. A man once bought a hat which was to small, so went to a goldsmith to squeze his head to make the head fit to the hat. We don’t change the Torsh but the environment.

    #1994005
    Zugger613
    Participant

    V’eschanan: See Who You Can Be

    Before his death, Moshe sought to recap all that had happened to Klal Yisroel in his lifetime, putting special emphasis on the things that needed improvement. Moshe did not hold back, letting the nation know exactly what their mistakes were.

    Yet constantly interspersed with this rebuke is a tremendous amount of praise. Moshe constantly emphasizes how special Klal Yisroel is, the chosen nation of Hashem. כי מי גוי גדול אשר לו אלוקים קרובים אליו

    The Ran explains that these two elements are both necessary and complimentary. As long as a person has not acknowledged his mistakes and shortcomings, he has no chance of fixing them. But it is not enough to just point these things out. A person also has to believe that he is capable of being better than he is now, that he can rise above his shortcomings, that he has the potential within him to be great. Only when a person sees both where they are and where they can reach can they excel.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #1994021
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    The Klei Yakar explains the pasuk bashomayim mimaal, the heaven above, vehaaretz mitochas, and earth below. This looks obvious. He explains how a person should learn mussar. When it comes to heavenly, spiritual things, one should look at people who are seen as being above him, to strive high, however, when it comes to earthly, material things, one should look at people below him, having less than him, becoming satisfied with what he has.

    #1997516
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Re’ah: Key to Contentment

    Chazal famously darshan עַשֵּׂר תְּעַשֵּׂר – עשר בשביל שתתעשר, tithe so that you will become wealthy. R’ Shimon Schwab finds this puzzling – since when is wealth the reason we do mitzvos, or even something we should be aspiring towards at all?

    R’ Schwab therefore interprets this based on another saying of Chazal: איזה הוא עשיר, השמח בחלקו. Chazal are not telling us to get rich, they are telling how to be happy with what we have.

    One who is only focused on amassing wealth for himself will never be satisfied: מי שיש לו מנה, רצה מאתיים. Only when we focus on what we can give to others can material possessions bring us satisfaction.

    R’ Schwab beautifully explains that this why the reward for giving tzeddaka is expressed as וַהֲרִיקֹתִ֥י לָכֶ֛ם בְּרָכָ֖ה עַד־בְּלִי־דָֽי, I will give you until you say “enough”. One who gives to others will be blessed with appreciation for what they have, and not want anything else.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #1997515
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Eikev: Do It Right

    Rashi famously writes that the Brachos in this week’s parsha are destined for those who keep מצוות קלות אשר דש בעקביו, the mitzvos that a person step on with his heel. This is generally understood to be referring to “small” mitzvos that some people ignore.

    However, R’ Moshe Feinstein writes that this is referring to the big mitzvos as well. He points out that Klal Yisroel were praised for accepting the Torah and mitzvos unconditionally when they said נעשה ונשמע, since they were willing to put aside their own opinions about right and wrong and completely obey Hashem’s Torah and mitzvos.

    And yet, says R’ Moshe, when it comes to the biggest mitzvos, such as learning Torah and giving Tzedaka, many people just do whatever they feel is right, without ever asking a shayla about what they should be doing or how they should be doing it.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #1997530
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    It says ואביו שמר את הדבר Yaakov Avinu waited and anticipated Yosef’s dream. It says ושמרתם ועשיתם אותם when it comes to doing mitzvos, we should wait for and anticipate to do them.

    #1997592
    abukspan
    Participant

    Yasher.Koach. I saw this today in the sefer and really like your write up.

    #1997647
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    The Chasan Sofer interprets the pasuk את קרבני לחמי לאשי ריח נכוח תשמרו להקריב לי במועדו why get a reward for doing mitzvos when we use Hashem’s bread (what belong to Him) for our sacrifice but My enjoyment is that you wait and anticipate the the time when you can do it.

    #1997673
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    Should be above, belongs to Hm

    #1999517
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Thanks abukspan

    #1999518
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Shoftim: Monkey See, Monkey Do

    There is a mitzva in this weeks parsha to appoint a Jewish King. And yet, when Bnei Yisroel approached Shmuel HaNavi about doing just that, they were rebuked for it. How can that be?

    The Ohr HaChaim explains that although the Jews of that generation were trying to do the right thing, they were doing it for the wrong reason. They didn’t want a king to fulfill the mitzva of Hashem: they just wanted to be like the nations around them, which all had kings. (This is supported by the observation of the Tur that Bnei Yisroel only asked for king in days of Shmuel, since that is when the Pilishtim began to have kings.)

    Don’t live your life as a copy of somebody else, even if that person is doing everything right. You have to figure out what’s right for you, and do it for the right reasons.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #1999544
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    When wanting a king the pasuk says, kechol hagoyim, as the nations do, but when the Torah commands us to appoint a king, it does not say it. You are allowed to appoint a king but not as the nations do.

    #1999548
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    The king carries a Sefer Torah constantly witb him to remember to follow it and not judge like all other nations as the pasuk Samuel (1,5,5) indicates.

    #1999556
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    Reah, Rav Shwab was mechaven to the Binah Leitim on Pirkei Avos that true wealth is what we give to and share with others. The Binah Leitim also says (Shevii shel Pesach) based on the pasuk olam chesed yiboneh, the world constantly stands on chesed, Hashem created the world to share His wealth with others. So vehalachto bedrachav. we should emulate His ways,so it makes sense that we should do the same to others.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Reb Eliezer.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Reb Eliezer.
    #2001443
    Zugger613
    Participant

    <strong>Ki Seitzi: In Gods Hands

    Rashi at the end of this weeks Parsha explains that the mitzva of remembering what Amalek did to us is placed right after the the issur of cheating in business, to teach us that this type of dishonesty will be punished by enemies attacking us.

    However, Rashi parshas Beshalach writes that Amalek attacked Bnei Yisroel because they said היש ה׳ בקרבנו, questioning if Hashem was really with them. Which one was it?

    R’ Moshe explains that in truth, these are not two different issues. One who thinks that they can get ahead in this world by dishonesty is actually denying that Hashem controls the world. One who believes that Hashem is with us and controls everything knows that only Hashem decides how much money he will end up with – he has no incentive to lie.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #2003413
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Ki Savo: Work Hard

    The Meforshim are bothered by several questions on the Pasuk of אֲרַמִּי֙ אֹבֵ֣ד אָבִ֔י וַיֵּ֣רֶד מִצְרַ֔יְמָה: First of all, what does Lavan bothering Yaakov have to do with going down to Mitrayim? Secondly, why does the Pasuk seem to imply that Lavan did destroy Yaakov if he was ultimately unsuccessful in doing so?

    The Kli Yakar has a fascinating explanation. He writes that on some level, Lavan did destroy Yaakov. From the time they spent together, Yaakov was affected by Lavan’s attitude towards this world. This why Yaakov was ביקש לישב בשלוה, slightly too concerned with his comfort in this world. And that is why Klal Yisroel had to go down to Mitzrayim; by experiencing being forced into backbreaking labor, they were able to internalize that אדם לעמל יולד.

    ‎לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    ‎לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #2003508
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    Ki Savo, the holy Alshich interprets the statement above as Lavan fooled Yaakov Avinu by destroying his intentions. He gave him Leah instand of Rachel and thereby caused the jealousy of the shefotim. This would not have happened if he had given Rachel first. Yosef would have been the bechor, the firstborn and thereby the Bnei Yisrael would not have ended up in Mitzraim.

    #2003637
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    This Klei Yakar is related to the other Klei Yakar at the end of Vayigash as he alludes to it there. What caused the servitude in Mitzraim is the absorbtion in the land and enjoyment of it, where they should have been strangers in a strange land, ki ger yihye zaracha, on which the mitzriim became jealous of, so they had the Jews work to weaken them.

    #2003648
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    I am refering to another Klei Yakar in Parashas Devarim on penu lochem tzafano, how to be careful in galus not to show off with fancy houses which makes the goyim jealous and creates our own antisemitism.

    #2005661
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Nitzavim: One For All and All For One

    Rashi famously writes that after Klal Yisroel heard all of the curses that would befall those who disregard the Torah, their faces turned green out of apprehension. Moshe then told them אתם נצבים היום כולכם, you’re all still here today; despite all the mistakes you’ve made, Hashem has not destroyed you.

    The obvious question is asked, wasn’t the whole point of the curses to impress upon the nation how crucial keeping the Torah is? Didn’t Moshe just undo what he’d set out to accomplish?

    R’ Betzalel Rudinsky points out that אתם נצבים היום כולכם is plural, referring to the whole nation. The Jewish people as a whole will never be destroyed, even if they may deserve it.

    So how do we as individuals tap into this group guarantee? The answer is to be כולכם, all together. If we are together as one, connected to every Jew, we are a part of the klal, and the klal will always make it.

    Heading into Rosh Hashanah, one way to merit a favorable judgement is to say בתוך עמי אנוכי ישוב, to be at peace with every Jew.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #2005705
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    Nitzavim, hayom is Rash Hashanah as by Chana. We stand in judgement but if we are kulchem, in unity, we will be worthy to the geulah, the redempton, lifnei Hashem, in Beis Hamikdash as the gemora in Rash Hashanah.

    #2006628
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Vayelech: Reconnecting

    Hashem tells Moshe some bad news in this weeks Parsha: after Moshe dies, the people will stray from the path, no longer doing what they are supposed to do and being who they are supposed to be. The consequences will be dire, mostly along the theme of: והסתרתי פני מהם, I will hide my face from them. If they turn their backs on me, I will turn my back them. There is no greater punishment than this. If you don’t want to develop a relationship with your Father in heaven, then you just won’t have one.

    The מבי״ט writes in בית אלוקים that although חרטה and עזיבת החטא are necessary components of Teshuva, they are not the actual essence of Teshuva. Teshuva literally means to return. If someone gets into a fight with a loved one, it is not enough to merely say sorry; they have to rebuild the relationship in order for it to go back to being what it used to be. Teshuva is that process of making it up to Hashem, of fixing what we broke, of coming back to once again be with Him.

    ‎לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    ‎לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #2006658
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    What you are saying is true if one does teshuva from meahava, love where one wants to get close to Hashem and his sins further him away rather than doing teshuva from yirah, fear of punishment.
    Ahava and Yirah have a connection. If you take the first two letters of יראה and אהבה we get יראה and the last two letters we get אהבה. First we repent from fear and than after getting cleansed partially from our sins, get closer to Hashem. It says שובה ישראל עד ה’ אלקיך explains the Klei Yakar that after doing teshuva from fear כי כשלת מעונך turning your purposeful sins to unintentional ones, so now do teshuva from love, by geting close to Hashem and turn them into benefits.

    #2007431
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    The Ramban asks. if one says that Hashem is not within me when these bad things happened, he seems to be doing teshuva through acknowledging the lack of Hashem driving his actions, so why punish him by not caring about him? Maybe, he is saying that Hashem was not the one who causes occurences but the horoscope, the stars, so Hashem says. if that is what you believe, I will look away from you and transfer your determination of your life occurences to them.

    #2009728
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Sukkos: What’s the Shake all About?

    Although m’ikkar ha’din one can fulfill the mitzva of lulav and esrog by merely picking them up, the משנה tells us to shake them during הלל when saying הודו לה׳ כי טוב and אנא ה׳ הושיעה נא.

    Based on medrashim, the תפארת ישראל explains that shaking the four species symbolizes shaking of every part of our body and soul in fervent prayer to Hashem, to both thank Him for all He’s given us and to request that His kindness continue to surround us.

    ‎לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    ‎לע”נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #2009740
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    The shaking of the lulav might be like shaking by davening based on the pasuk כל עצמותי תאמרנה ה’ מי כמוך, all my bones recognize your existence Hashem. Rav Moshe ztz’l stopped shaking by davening based on a story I heard. A nazi german soldier pointed a gun on him. He said this shock I have I want to remember and use it at my davenen.

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