The Amelia Bedelia interpretation of “antisemitism”

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  • #2242042
    👑RebYidd23
    Participant

    Somehow, even though we’ve been over this millions of times, it keeps happening. When it comes to antisemitism, people lose the ability to understand a word’s meaning and become compelled to take it apart to its roots to misinterpret it. To make matters worse, most of them don’t even bake a dessert to make up for it!

    #2242073
    Amil Zola
    Participant

    Reb, I doubt most here have not read Amelia Bedelia. You may have to explain it to them.

    #2242086
    ☕️coffee addict
    Participant

    There is a Jewish form of Amelia bedilia

    #2242102
    Amil Zola
    Participant

    Coffee addict, have you. ever read Amelia Bedelia?

    #2242168
    ☕️coffee addict
    Participant

    Amil

    Yes I have

    You make it sound like frum Jews are uniform

    But anyways I’m a Baal Teshuva (albeit at a youngish age)

    Anyways the Jewish form made shabbos and messed up everything (like put the soup on the stove and she just put it there etc)

    #2242195
    whitecar
    Participant

    @Amil Zola, edited. Yes as a kid, every kids book shelf had a collection of Amelia Bedelia books. They were next to the front doors in Jewish toy stores, and where available in our elementary school libraries.

    I know you like to think of us as uneducated brainwashed fools who won’t eat breakfast unless we ask a shailah to our Rav.

    You need to open your eyes and mind  and stop believing the fantasies that you read and project about us.

    Edited

    #2242196
    Amil Zola
    Participant

    Actually I do recognize some frumma may read Amelia B, but since I don’t assume I ask. I remember first reading AB and realized it was just a retelling of Bartleby the Scrivener by Melville although for a younger audience.

    #2242204
    amiricanyeshivish
    Participant

    I did too and I am FFB. I think most people did.

    #2242437
    commonsaychel
    Participant

    @Amil, I am from chasidish stock [ actually from a rebbish family] I read Curious George as a very young child, went on to Amilea Bedelia, to Mark Twain and Jack London etc. That being said I would seriously hesitate to expose children these days to the books out there, you can hardly find a book there that is not peddling absolute drivel about diversity, environmentalism etc.

    I echo whitecar thoughts about how you view Chasidish / Black Hat people, anytime you are ready to come from PWN to the NY metro region I will be glad to introduce you to some very successful Doctors, Lawyers, Business owners even some members of NYPD who have beards, payis and do not feel compelled to hid ones yiddishkiet,

    #2242553

    True, libraries do not have or hide those books, but you can buy them either ata library book sale or at a estate sale in any educated neighborhood. The tick is more to make kids read them. I read London to the kids when they were little, but further progress stalled when they got socialized into “math is hard” and “classics is boring”. With Twain, I esigned to just quote his witticisms, starting with the most appropriate “when I came back home, I found out that my father became much smarter”.

    As to “hiding”, I don’t think this is a deciding factor in yiddishkeit level – Sephardim, for example, dressed like Spaniards or Arabs for centuries, often keeping their Yehadut at home, and survived with more or less same success/failure as Ashkenazim.

    #2242575
    maskildoresh
    Participant

    I don’t think that Amelia Bedeila is connected in any way to the great Bartelby, who prefers not to.

    The unfortunate message that the books give over is that good cooking can allow stupidity and wilful irresponsiblity to be overlooked and forgiven. There are others who share that view.

    I missed the intent of the original post completely. Please elaborate.

    #2242576
    maskildoresh
    Participant

    Therese Raquin is far better literature.

    #2242624
    Yserbius123
    Participant

    @Amil Zola “Bartleby the Scrivener”? In what way? Bartleby didn’t take things literally, he (for some unclear reason) had a drive to be a scrivener, copying down legal documents, and was mentally incapable of doing anything else.

    #2242673
    commonsaychel
    Participant

    @AAQ, way off topic, the only reason I even mentioned this is because of Amil’s gratuitous cheap shot at the black hat and chasidish communities, she was not taking a cheap shot at the historical norms of the Sefardish community, try to stick to the topic at hand.

    #2242744
    Amil Zola
    Participant

    Hmm it’s a darned if you do and darned if you don’t position I’m in. Because I asked a clarifying question rather than just assuming. Oh well at 70+ years old and being on the internet since the 80s disparagement of my posts have no impact on me. I grew up in a household where literature wasn’t censored, although I’m in contact with others, both in my family and community who do censor their childrens reading materials.

    Ad meah v’esrim!

    #2242793
    whitecar
    Participant

    @Amil Zola, my comment was not just in reference to what you wrote here. I see your posts all over the place, and it’s clear you have this biased assumption of what FFBs are.

    #2242824
    commonsaychel
    Participant

    @Amil, its not just this post but in general the dismissive nature of post in regards to charadi and chasidim, this is what you wrote “Reb, I doubt most here have not read Amelia Bedelia. You may have to explain it to them.” does that sound like a clarifying question or a put down?
    Being that you live in the PWN I doubt if you have interactions with Charadi/Chasidish people on a daily basis.
    PS My offer stands, in fact I can introduce you to several people of FT 500 list, bankers, and insurance companies owners who are proud charadi/ chasidish in addition to the doctors and lawyer I mentioned before.

    #2242861

    White car (in a black hat?), I think she has certain presumptions about certain communities, not about any ffbs. You are, probably unconsciously, denying that other traditions are also organically observant.

    #2242953
    whitecar
    Participant

    @always_ask_questions fair point. Ffbs is a very broad term. Black hats might be more appropriate in this context.

    #2243136

    whitecar, right, this is a more reasonable claim. But, then, you should not be upset so much at her – a black hat seems to be a self-imposed symbol of rejecting any changes to the society that happened after Jews and non-Jews were wearing similar (often cheaper) hats & clothes 300 years ago.

    That would exclude Amelia/Bedelia. You are free to disprove this assumption, but she is just responding to the message. Of course, it is easy to avid being sterotyped by going to an even older tradition of Rambam – I do not mean a turban or a kefiya, but nice and clean clothes, not too rich, not too poor, not attracting attention (Deot 5:9)

    #2243140
    commonsaychel
    Participant

    @ Amil its beyond me how anyone could even remotely construe this as a question, “Reb, I doubt most here have not read Amelia Bedelia. You may have to explain it to them.” in reality it’s a cheap shot edited

    PS Not only have my kids read Amilia Bedelia and all the classics, they also know who Van Gogh, Rembrandt and Monet are, and who Beethoven, Bach and Chopin are, they all wear chasidisher Levush, speak a flawless English and send the kids to chasidisher yeshivas.

    To quote @white car “I know you like to think of us as uneducated brainwashed fools who won’t eat breakfast unless we ask a shailah to our Rav.
    You need to open your eyes and mind and stop believing the fantasies that you read and project about us.”
    I think an apology from you would be a nice start.

    #2243354

    common, not that I consider people who did not read Amelia Shmodelia uneducated, but your comparison is not fully fair: you are probably somewhat an outlier in your community.

    Rather than comparing two communities – blac v stam hats – by an average person, let me compare by the higher ones. A typical gemora class in a black hat community starts with tannaim and ends with R Feinstein. In a modernishe class, discussion also goes into Roman civil law, Rambam’s reference to Plato, supreme court cases in 1970s, 19th century Germany, and a latest book or paper by one of the class participants.. Does not mean that the black hat class does not anyone to discuss Plato, but not enough to have a joint discussion.

    #2243553
    commonsaychel
    Participant

    @AAQ, I never asked for an apology from you, you may have been guilty of going off topic and discussing MO vs Chasidish /Charedi, you were not the one who took a cheap shot at these communities.
    @ Amil, it’s a shame you were not in the East Coast this week, I would have gotten you tickets to the Orthodox Consruction trade show, in where there was 100’s of booths of various companies involved in construction with the average company booking 50M in annual sales. [ps the owner may or may not know who Amilia B is, but he has a net worth 100X of yours]

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