The Room Temperature Food Mystery

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Viewing 21 posts - 1 through 21 (of 21 total)
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  • #1395558

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Does room temperature food feel cold when you eat it because it’s cooler than the inside of your mouth, which is usually somewhere around 98.5 degrees?

    And if it does feel cold because it’s cooler than our mouths, how come we cannot just breathe on our food to heat it?

    Thank you in advance 🙂

    Sincerely,
    Someone eating room temperature food, wishing it was warm

    #1395634

    Joseph
    Participant

    Are you a hot-head, cool headed or cold blooded?

    #1395632

    ubiquitin
    Participant

    “Does room temperature food feel cold when you eat it because it’s cooler than the inside of your mouth, which is usually somewhere around 98.5 degrees?”

    No it feels cold because it cooler than you usually eat it. For example soup (eaten at ~140 degrees) feels cold at 100 degrees though that is well above room temperature. and melted ice cream that has been sitting and is at room temperature out does not feel cold

    #1396978

    Meno
    Participant

    Why do we feel hot when it’s 90 degrees outside if our body temperature is higher than 90 degrees?

    #1397116

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Deep question Meno!

    #1397318

    Meno
    Participant

    It’s not really deep. It’s a science question with a logical answer.

    #1397432

    ☕ DaasYochid ☕
    Participant

    Why do we feel hot when it’s 90 degrees outside if our body temperature is higher than 90 degrees?

    Because our bodies are having a hard time getting rid of their excess heat since the surrounding temperature is so close to its own.

    Now answer this: why does a fan make us feel cooler if it’s the same temperature air circulating?

    #1397589

    Avram in MD
    Participant

    Lightbrite,

    Does room temperature food feel cold when you eat it because it’s cooler than the inside of your mouth, which is usually somewhere around 98.5 degrees?

    Room temperature is certainly colder than the inside of your mouth, but I think our conceptions of “hot” and “cold” food are driven more by expectation. Consider room temperature water – most people don’t consider that to be “cold” when drinking it.

    And if it does feel cold because it’s cooler than our mouths, how come we cannot just breathe on our food to heat it?

    You can warm cold food by breathing on it, just like you can warm your hands in the winter by breathing on them.

    #1397629

    Avram in MD
    Participant

    DaasYochid,

    Now answer this: why does a fan make us feel cooler if it’s the same temperature air circulating?

    1. Evaporation is a cooling process (changing water from liquid to vapor takes heat energy), so our sweat is designed to help cool us off. Moving the air over the sweat increases the rate of evaporation.
    2. The moving air generates forced convection that transfers heat away from our bodies.

    #1397671

    ☕ DaasYochid ☕
    Participant

    Interesting. I had heard the second reason, but not the first.

    So if the temperature in the room were precisely the same as your body temperature, there would still be a cooling effect?

     

    #1397716

    Avram in MD
    Participant

    DaasYochid,

    So if the temperature in the room were precisely the same as your body temperature, there would still be a cooling effect?

    Yes due to the evaporation. And if the air was that hot and also saturated, the only question would be whether the heat stroke or superstorm gets you first.

    #1398260

    DovidBT
    Participant

    Someone once told me that while 90-100 degrees is uncomfortable, if the temperature is raised, e.g. to 120 degrees, it becomes more comfortable. So instead of using A/C or fans, turn on the heat.

    I’ve never tested this theory.

    #1398718

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Meno, it is a pretty deep question, because if your question only braised the surface, then ascertaining that the body is higher than 90-degrees internally wouldn’t fly with scientists.

    Probing deeper, to collect evidence of the internal human temperature, would then provide the material needed to make an effective and sound argument.

    #1398721

    Meno
    Participant

    What?

    #1398805

    ☕ DaasYochid ☕
    Participant

    Meno, it is a pretty deep question, because if your question only braised the surface, then ascertaining that the body is higher than 90-degrees internally wouldn’t fly with scientists.

    Probing deeper, to collect evidence of the internal human temperature, would then provide the material needed to make an effective and sound argument.

    #1398820

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    When you eat cold protein, your body heats up.

    When you eat ginger, your body heats up.

    #1398823

    ☕ DaasYochid ☕
    Participant

    What?

    #1398826

    zahavasdad
    Participant

    sometimes i wonder if joseph is a fan of rav miller or an oponent of rav miller

    #1398831

    Meno
    Participant

    “When you eat cold protein, your body heats up.

    When you eat ginger, your body heats up.”

    Also guacamole

    #1398833

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    When you swim across the Arctic Ocean, your car cools down.

    #1416580

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    What if you eat your first bite (or non-bite) of guacamole at precisely the same moment that you jump into the deep cold blue sea… will hot peppers prevent you from getting hypothermia?

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