Who Invented The Internet?

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  • #602512
    Derech
    Member

    It wasn’t Al Gore.

    #860607
    soliek
    Member

    LIAR

    #860608
    zahavasdad
    Participant

    The Satan

    The Satan is always inventing new ways to create bittul torah

    #860609
    ED IT OR
    Participant

    the British

    #860610
    avhaben
    Participant

    The United States Military in 1969. Specifically, DARPA. It was originally called ARPANet. Later, in the early 1980’s, the U.S. National Science Foundation joined the network, and it became the Internet. Later in the ’80’s, many U.S. (and later international) universities joined, followed by coroporate entities, followed by ISP’s for the general public in the early ’90’s.

    #860611
    more
    Member

    the Americans;)

    #860612
    OneOfMany
    Participant

    avhaben: Not true (well, mostly not). There is major machlokes as to which technological innovation represents the origins of the Internet. And even among those who say that packet-switching is the definitive technology, ARPAnet is still not considered the primordial Internet, because a) it wasn’t the first to use packet-switching, b) it was not premised on enabling long-distance communication c) it was not comprised of interconnected networks. The last two criteria are widely accepted as part of the definition of an internet. The most that can really be said about ARPAnet is that it was a milestone in the development of the Internet.

    #860613
    avhaben
    Participant

    OOM: And who, exactly, do you think could claim being the predecessor, or inventor, of the internet? Specifically. What I wrote above is entirely factual and correct.

    Btw, ArpaNet was build for LD communications and was in fact designed to withstand a nuclear attack.

    TCP/IP — the technology the internet is based on — came about with the NSFNet (that I referenced above) in the ’80’s, which interconnected to the ARPANet, thus making the Internet.

    #860614
    OneOfMany
    Participant

    Yes, who? Do you think DARPA invented packet-switching? The major innovation that ARPAnet brought was packet-switching, but as I said, they weren’t the first to develop it or use it. They were just the first to use it in an operational network of such scale. That’s why ARPAnet later became the backbone of the burgeoning Internet. And it really isn’t accurate b’chlal to say any single person or technology “made” the Internet. It was developed through many different stages. Also, you obviously don’t know what I meant by “premised on enabling long-distance communication.” Do you actually have any knowledge of computing theory, or are you getting all this off of Google?

    #860615
    dash™
    Participant

    Vint Cerf.

    #860616
    ahavas_yisroel
    Participant

    It certainly wasn’t Al Gorenisht.

    #860617
    avhaben
    Participant

    OOM: The topic here isn’t the history of packet switching or network topologies. It is the Internet. The ARPANet is the first first forerunner network of today’s internet, regardless of what network technology it utilized. NSFNet is the second forerunner network of the internet. NSFNet internetworked with the existing ARPANet. That’s when it became knowns as the internet. NSFNet had restrictions on commercial use. It was decommisioned in ’95. I’ve been involved with the network since ’91, and know this stuff without Google.

    #860618
    avhaben
    Participant

    dash: Vint was one of the founding fathers of the internet, but hardly the only.

    #860619
    Horrified
    Participant

    History of the Internet

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jump to: navigation, search

    Main article: Internet

    The history of the Internet began with the development of computers in the 1950s. This began with point-to-point communication between mainframe computers and terminals, expanded to point-to-point connections between computers and then early research into packet switching. Packet switched networks such as ARPANET, Mark I at NPL in the UK, CYCLADES, Merit Network, Tymnet, and Telenet, were developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s using a variety of protocols. The ARPANET in particular led to the development of protocols for internetworking, where multiple separate networks could be joined together into a network of networks.

    In 1982 the Internet Protocol Suite (TCP/IP) was standardized and the concept of a world-wide network of fully interconnected TCP/IP networks called the Internet was introduced. Access to the ARPANET was expanded in 1981 when the National Science Foundation (NSF) developed the Computer Science Network (CSNET) and again in 1986 when NSFNET provided access to supercomputer sites in the United States from research and education organizations. Commercial internet service providers (ISPs) began to emerge in the late 1980s and 1990s. The ARPANET was decommissioned in 1990. The Internet was commercialized in 1995 when NSFNET was decommissioned, removing the last restrictions on the use of the Internet to carry commercial traffic.

    Since the mid-1990s the Internet has had a drastic impact on culture and commerce, including the rise of near-instant communication by electronic mail, instant messaging, Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) “phone calls”, two-way interactive video calls, and the World Wide Web with its discussion forums, blogs, social networking, and online shopping sites. The research and education community continues to develop and use advanced networks such as NSF’s very high speed Backbone Network Service (vBNS), Internet2, and National LambdaRail. Increasing amounts of data are transmitted at higher and higher speeds over fiber optic networks operating at 1-Gbit/s, 10-Gbit/s, or more. The Internet continues to grow, driven by ever greater amounts of online information and knowledge, commerce, entertainment and social networking.

    It is estimated that in 1993 the Internet carried only 1% of the information flowing through two-way telecommunication. By 2000 this figure had grown to 51%, and by 2007 more than 97% of all telecommunicated information was carried over the Internet.[1]

    thank you wikipedia.

    #860620
    akuperma
    Participant

    It was the American military to promote its own internal communications, and scientific research. Al Gore, then a Senator, along with the of the Congress voted to authorize the military to open it up to civilian use, though since it was used to communicate with civilian scientists it had been somewhat demilitarized already.

    THe World Wide Web was invented by some Swiss scientists looking for a better way to use the “internet”. Previously (and if you don’t use a graphic brower, even today), the internet was largely for text email and sending files (the ftp system).

    Arguably the origin of the internet was the telegraph invented in the early 19th century (which at the time caused complaints about its social impact not unlike those heard about the internet today, e.g. female telegraph operators “chatting” with male telegraph operators).

    #860621
    2scents
    Participant

    the Internet as a whole?

    each part was invented (discovered) by a different party.

    #860622
    OneOfMany
    Participant

    avhaben: Then I apologize. But I still think that you are misrepresenting this issue. If the OP asked how the Internet originated, a possible answer would be with ARPAnet. But he asked who invented it, and the answer really is nobody. It was an evolution of technologies.

    #860623
    ZeesKite
    Participant

    It was really me. I hooked up a typewriter in my room to another one in my brother’s room. We exchanged letters. Then one day my house was full of official looking officialdom, and… the rest is history. (really?)

    #860624
    2scents
    Participant

    Because mommy said so..

    #860625
    HaLeiVi
    Participant

    Graham Bell invented it. At first his invention was used for sending and recieving voice signals. Over time, more and more was attached to these lines: first fax signals, then frequency modulated bytes.

    Using standard evolution theory there is no need to ask who invented it. The phone system realized its limits and evolved a central DNS system and an HTML language for browsers to interpret, much the way the fish being chased up the beach decided it’s high time to develope feet.

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