Why does certain music make us cry?

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  • #609972
    WIY
    Member

    Looking for some deep explanations to why music makes us cry. (And if you want to take it further, why different songs move different people)

    #964647
    Shopping613 🌠
    Participant

    Music is the language of the neshomah. Each neshoma is different, we all hve had different expiriences and feelings just like we all dont love the same food, different music moves us. DUH!

    #964648
    WIY
    Member

    Shopping613

    By why does music specifically make us cry, more than other things?

    #964649
    Torah613Torah
    Participant

    Google: Feelings and perceptions of happiness and sadness induced by music: Similarities, differences, and mixed emotions.

    #964650
    Oh Shreck!
    Participant

    One not so deep reason, maybe it’s the musician’s rendering at fault.

    (couldn’t resist)

    #964651
    HaLeiVi
    Participant

    Music is a medium which allows for many emotions to modulated upon it. All or most of the ways that a mood changes us, have a corresponding nuance affecting a melody. We can feel loose and free, or tight and apprehensive. We can feel inventive and explorative or hampered and inhibited. There is closeness, loneliness, upbeat, new and fresh, interested, excited, bored, stuck, aloof, above, far away, completely enveloped, under, above, lost, at home, energetic, and generally happy. Music has a parallel for each of these.

    It can be so subtle that the composer usually doesn’t plan the theme this way. He tries to engulf himself in a mood and the theme flows forth. The general style is usually planned.

    Being that subtle is precisely why it is so powerful. If it were explicit it would not carry emotions; your heart would not read it, and it would be academic. Now that it is not understood it bypasses the brain and is interpreted by the heart who resonates with the nuances.

    #964652
    rebdoniel
    Member

    The Rambam paskened that nobody should listen to music nowddays because in the absence of the Beit haMikdash, we’re not supposed to be so happy. This doesn’t seem to be concerned with the fact that music can also be a means of deepening one’s sadness, grief, and introspection. Jewish songs like Mama Rochel accomplish this, as do secular songs like “In My Life” by the Beatles.

    #964653

    So rebdoniel, just because the Bais Hamikdash isn’t around, we should take away stuff that makes us happy?

    #964654
    jbaldy22
    Member

    @cant_stop_laughing

    yes because we are supposed to be in aveilus for the churban. The oilam has been noheg to be meikel throughout the year in regards to music. During the 3 weeks we do (or rather don’t do) what we really should be doing the rest of the year. The Gemora brings other examples of things the amoraim did to mourn for the churban year round although many of those things would fall under the category of mechzi keyuhara nowadays for most people.

    #964655
    younglady
    Member

    cant_stop_laughing: there are people who don’t listen to music the whole year.

    #964656
    Shopping613 🌠
    Participant

    I wrote music is the language of our neshoma, music is one of the only things that can sorta speak to our holiest part in ouf body, our essense. Other things just dont. Everywhere we see music. Dovid Hamelech wrote Tehilim/Psalms that are like poems or music, that must of spoken to his neshoma, what his name played a harp for yackov, so he wouldbt be so freaked to see yosef, and it says he sort knew from the music that he was gonna see yosef cuz it got through to his soul. One day im gonna write music, and i hope my songs can touch other peiples souls too.

    #964657
    Oh Shreck!
    Participant

    Shopping, will you spell correctly in music language?

    #964658
    Shopping613 🌠
    Participant

    I was writing that really fast, I can write properly if I took the time. REALLY! You don’t beleive me??????!!! Seriously?!? It’s not that hard even!!!!!

    #964659
    Oh Shreck!
    Participant

    Shopping, I know that. I was just kidding. (thought you knew that)

    #964660

    jbaldy22: Can you please write your second sentence into English? I have no idea what “noheg to be meikel” means.

    #964661
    TIDE
    Member

    My principle teacher has not listened to music for himself in nearly 20 years, since his own rebbe muvhak died. He made a neder not to listen as a sign of personal aveilus until he found a new teacher of equal or greater caliber in all respects, and he hasn’t found one, so he hasn’t listened.

    #964662
    rebdoniel
    Member

    In an unredeemed, imperfect, fallible world, we’re supposed to be conscious of the fact that the world is so shattered in the absence of geulah. Hence practices like tikkun hatzot, which I’ve done for over a year now.

    #964663
    WIY
    Member

    Rebdoniel

    I’m impressed that you do Tikkun Chatzos. See what the Yesod Veshoresh Hoavodah says about it. If you never learned that Sefer go get your hands on it. Really amazing Sefer.

    #964664
    rebdoniel
    Member

    I’ve learned portions of it. I see Musar and Hasidut as very meaningful parts of my life, as I am a very spiritual person by nature.

    #964665

    Rabbi YY Rubinstein quotes R’Alkabitz to say that at Achashverosh’s party all 5 senses except one was apealled to. They had gold chairs=feel, food=taste and smell, beautiful stuff=sight. There were zonahs on hand ready for use. The only thing which wasnt there was music because any music invokes some sort of spirituality.

    #964666

    I don’t love music..I love naat

    #964667
    oomis
    Participant

    Music reaches deep down into our neshamas and touches chords that sometimes remain untapped. I know that certain pieces wil ALWAYS elicit tears when I hear them. Perhaps there is a subconscious association with the music, or the instruments being played, or the subject matter of the songs. When I hear the music from Les Miserables, particularly when Valjean sings “Bring him home…” I am a puddle of goop. Jewish music likewise affects me, especially the Im Eshkacheich that was sung at my daughter’s chasunah.

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