Would you let your children listen to non-jewish music?

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Viewing 19 posts - 51 through 69 (of 69 total)
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  • #1522796
    Shopping613 🌠
    Participant

    huju, so what does your Rabbi suggest you do?

    #1522835
    nusah18
    Participant

    I heard no one talk about Nusach Hatefillah and its importance. If parents and teachers taught this subject in school we’d have young men that know how to daven properly. Instead they listen to what’s on the Jewish stations and use these tunes for tefillos like Kedusha and Hallel. It’s like going to a Carlebach concert during Kedusha. It makes the tefillah mundane and not rich and filled with malchus. I personally don’t mind people listening for enjoyment any type of music they enjoy outside of tefillah, but don’t bring that stuff into shul!

    #1522909
    👑RebYidd23
    Participant

    Maybe for some people it makes the tefillah leibidig and geshmak instead of by rote and without focus.

    #1523081
    JewishMusicGemach
    Participant

    Non-jewish music is detrimental to the soul.
    It’s something debated a lot, and thee’s no lack of material online explaining why this is so.
    It’s a very big nisayon, and for that reason I created a Jewish Music Gemach, where anyone who deletes non-jewish music can receive thousands of free frum songs.

    And many singers are happily involved, I am endorsed by rabbanim.
    Because they all know….

    They once asked Shlomo Carlebach why is it that his music is so widely known and popular and has not faded into the background, even after tens of years. He replied that it is because he never once heard a non-jewish song in his life, and all the music he creates is so pure, and you can feel it.

    #1523117
    ☕ DaasYochid ☕
    Participant

    He replied that it is because he never once heard a non-jewish song in his life

    That’s demonstrably untrue. In fact, there are at least two songs he recorded which were non-Jewish: Kumbaya, and the second part of Ki Va Moed.

    It’s amazing that this myth keeps being repeated.

    #1530778
    SarahLevine613
    Participant

    I think someone else pointed out the “real question”. In this case it appears that the children listen to Non Jewish Music. The question wasnt should I MAKE my children listen to non jewish music. (I assumed — from the beginning that NJM meant 2018 — can i say that — pop/rock/hiphop music). The question is once your kids listen to the music what do you do? Obviously, that question is not answerable in a general way. I tried to teach my kids that just like with non-jewish books — there is appropriate and inappropriate; and with art — there is appropriate and inappropriate — music is no different. Dont we teach kids to make choices and differentiate all the time?

    #1559388
    knaidlach
    Participant

    a song is the ‘pen of the soul’. meaning it expressess the soul of the one composed the song. a yid especialy a child should stay away from connecting to the ‘soul’ of a goy or anyone you dont aprove of their ideas, midos, way of life etc. etc.

    #1559398
    Avi K
    Participant

    Knaidlach, does that mean that a Litvak should not listen to Chassidic music. If I do not approve of draft dodgers should I refrain from listening to their music? What about someone who claims that Reform Jews are not Jewish?

    #1559418
    Shopping613 🌠
    Participant

    I love both litvaks and chassidim and their paths are queally valid, so obviously no question there.

    #1559461
    knaidlach
    Participant

    avi k. it seems you have already listened to chasidic music in the past, so its too late now, you are already connected to the soul of chasidim,

    #1559512
    Avi K
    Participant

    What about Chassidic music that comes from non-Jewish sources?

    #1559529
    Takes2-2tango
    Participant

    I can guarantee u that blogging and commenting here all day is certainly worse then listening to non Jewish music.

    #1559511
    Avi K
    Participant

    Knaidlach, I have also listened to Simon & Garfunkel (do they count?), John Denver, Elton John (toeva) , etc. I have even listened to Motown songs. Does this mean that my soul is attuned to the whole world? What about Rav Ovadia, who loved listening to Umm Kulthum, even when he learned?

    #1559661
    Midwest2
    Participant

    There’s another issue here: how old is the child? Can an elementary school child be presented with non-Jewish music? In this case, the parent has control about what the child hears. Obviously, you’re going to be careful not to expose the child to anything confusing.

    For teenagers? That’s another story. Teenagers have their own preferences, usually strongly influenced by their peer group, and may not hold with their parents’ choices. In fact, for the sake of establishing their independence they may go directly against their parents’ wishes.

    Two separate problems, actually.

    #1559685
    Takes2-2tango
    Participant

    Is it ok to listen to frum singers who were caught doing big averos. Its public knowledge if you would only do a google search. Is it bad for the soul if u listen to them? Or should one assume they did teshuva?

    #1560553
    👑RebYidd23
    Participant

    Even if music is the language of the soul, a soul cannot simply be summed up as good or bad by music listeners.

    #1560565
    knaidlach
    Participant

    takes2-2tango. so how much time is it OK to spend here?

    avi k. besises rav ovadia i dont know who the others are

    #1560652
    Takes2-2tango
    Participant

    knaidlachParticipant
    takes2-2tango. so how much time is it OK to spend here?
    —-+———–_——————-
    Knaidlach, if your asking ,ur most likely
    A blogging attict.

    #1562472
    knaidlach
    Participant

    Take2-2tango. you might be right. and it really bothers me. any advice?

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