Brooklyn vs. Queens

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  • #1394131

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    What’s the difference?

    Thank you ☺

    #1394258

    ubiquitin
    Participant

    I’ve lived in both.
    What do you want to know?

    The biggest differences size

    #1394413

    Joseph
    Participant

    Brooklyn is Kings County whereas Queens is only Queens County. And we all know how Kings stack up to Queens. (Remember Anne Boleyn?)

    #1394445

    ☕ DaasYochid ☕
    Participant

    What’s the difference?

    They are two different places. There are many different neighborhoods within each.

    I think to get meaningful answers, you’ll have to be more specific as far as what you want to know.

    #1394452

    Joseph
    Participant

    Queens was once considered more upscale than Brooklyn, as far as frum neighborhoods.

    #1394851

    zahavasdad
    Participant

    Brooklyn is more expensive than Queens

    #1395033

    Joseph
    Participant

    The besserer mentchen used to move from Brooklyn to Queens, back in the day. Now the besserer mentchen move to the Five Towns or Teaneck.

    #1395046

    WinnieThePooh
    Participant

    Many differences- starting with the accent.
    Queens has 2 airports, a baseball stadium and a tennis center.
    Brooklyn has Coney Island, an Aquarium and 13th Ave.
    Here’s one you in particular might find interesting- Brooklyn has 770, where the Lubavitcher Rebbe lived. Queens has the cemetery where he is buried.

    #1395078

    yehudayona
    Participant

    Joseph, before your “back in the day” besserer mentchen moved from the Lower East Side to the Bronx. Neither of which is Brooklyn or Queens.

    One difference that’s significant to the readership of the CR is that many neighborhoods in Queens have eruvs that are widely accepted.

    WTP, Brooklyn used to have an airport. In fact it was NYC’s first municipal airport. It also used to have a baseball stadium. Queens also has a 13th Avenue where it’s easier to park than on Brooklyn’s.

    #1395101

    Meno
    Participant

    The price of Cholov Yisroel milk is significantly higher in Queens than it is in Brooklyn.

    Maybe because of the eruv.

    #1395111

    ☕ DaasYochid ☕
    Participant

    They don’t make eruv tavshilin in Queens? And how does that affect the price of cholov Yisroel milk?

    #1395125

    zahavasdad
    Participant

    The Eruv Hazoth in Queens is the only one personally approved by Rav Moshe. He approved no other Eruv’s

    #1395151

    Joseph
    Participant

    Joseph, before your “back in the day” besserer mentchen moved from the Lower East Side to the Bronx. Neither of which is Brooklyn or Queens.

    Yeah, but that was in the age of the dinosaurs.

    #1395148

    yehudayona
    Participant

    Meno, I can get CY milk in Queens for $2.50 or less. It’s often on sale for $1.99. ZD, which eruv in Queens was approved by Rav Moshe? There are many, at least these days.

    #1395165

    lesschumras
    Participant

    Brooklyn has a baseball stadium, in Coney Island.
    Joseph, when people began leaving Brooklyn, it was more to Long Island than Queens.
    Brooklyn was largely settled by the Dutch ( Brooklyn,Midwood and Flatbush are of Dutch origin ) while Queens was settled by the British

    #1395168

    ☕ DaasYochid ☕
    Participant

    Meno’s shopping in the wrong place.

    #1395170

    bhyy
    Participant

    If you live in Brooklyn, spend a Shabbos in Queens… lots of communities in Queens to check out, and lots of sub communities too. We run the full gamut between Kew Gardens Hills and Kew Gardens…Yeshivish, YI, kiruv, chassidishe, neo-chasidishe, sefaradi, ashkenazi, bucharian, russian, even conservative. Multiple mikvahs and kosher food too. Then there’s Fresh Meadows, Hillcrest and Jamaica Estates. Queens offers a little something for everyone. You could spend more than a few months of Shabbossim sampling it all. Very open and welcoming here.

    #1395176

    Joseph
    Participant

    If you live in Queens you can spend many many wonderful Shabbosim in Brooklyn and still not anywhere near complete visiting all the many and varied beautiful frum communities in town.

    #1395191

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    WinnieThePooh, omgosh thank you!!!

    Wow, I always thought that the Rebbe’s Ohel and 770 were on the same property! Whoa… so interesting.

    I remember hearing how he’d go to his father-in-law’s to daven for people, and thinking that he was going someplace at 770.

    Thank you for the info 🙂

    #1395205

    yehudayona
    Participant

    Joseph, when you visit those Brooklyn communities on Shabbos, make sure you don’t have a cold, because you won’t be able to carry tissues.

    #1395206

    Joseph
    Participant

    IOW, Brooklyn is for the living Torah and Queens is where people go to bury??

    #1395207

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Second the question of how the eruv affects the cost of Cholov Yisroel milk

    #1395277

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    If I visit Queens, what else is there to do in addition to visiting the Rebbe’s Ohel?

    #1395300

    zahavasdad
    Participant

    The Kew Gardens Hills Eruv was personally inspected and approved by Rav Moshe. After he approved it he honestly was not too happy how people used it and refused to approve any more Eruvs, but he didnt take away his blessing from Kew Gardens Hills Eruv

    #1395326

    WinnieThePooh
    Participant

    LB, if the Mets or the US Open don’t interest you (or it’s not that time of year) you can do some shopping on Main St in Kew Gardens Hills, eat lunch at one of several pizza stores, get some take-out and baked goods for shabbos. then head over to Flushing Meadows Park- feed the ducks, take a nice long walk around the park, visit the Queens Museum, the zoo, the site of the 1964 World’s Fair, etc. You can even visit Trump’s childhood home in Jamaica Estates.

    YY- the Dodgers and a “used to have an airport” don’t count, since LB can’t go back in time. As far as 13th Ave in College Point, Queens …I don’t think it has what BoroPark’s 13th Ave has to offer. Maybe there are other 13th Aves?

    #1395330

    Lubavitcher
    Participant

    The rebbe didn’t live in 770 that’s the shul
    He lived on president st

    #1395359

    Joseph
    Participant

    Winnie: How do you suggest visiting the site of the 1964 World’s Fair but then, in the same breath, knock visiting Brooklyn because you “can’t go back in time”? That’s just a minor quibble, by the way. Brooklyn has far far more Jewishly to offer than Queens.

    #1395370

    Joseph
    Participant

    Queens uses a crazy street numbering system. For example, you got 159th St followed by 159th Ave and 159 Pl before it goes to 160th and does the same thing. Brooklyn goes in numerical and alphabetical order in an easily understood street grid plan.

    #1395368

    zahavasdad
    Participant

    There is a baseball stadium in Coney Island.

    One can also Visit 3 decent sized Yeshivas in Queens. Chofetz Chaim, Ohr Chaim and Lander College

    #1395379

    Joseph
    Participant

    On some blocks in Brooklyn you can visit three decent sized Yeshivas on one city block.

    #1395495

    bhyy
    Participant

    Don’t forget, while similar in so many ways, a big difference is that “Queens” is spelled Q-u-e-e-n-s, and “Brooklyn” is spelled, B-r-o-o-k-l-y-n.

    #1395501

    WinnieThePooh
    Participant

    Joseph, I did not say to visit the World’s Fair, but the site… it’s still there in the present, and is a somewhat interesting place to visit.
    Note that the OP did not ask how Brooklyn and Queens differed Jewishly, or which was better.
    And the crazy street numbering is to keep out unwanted guests, of course! If you are referring to KGH, then you would be talking about numbers in 60s and 70s that are sometimes re-used as Ave, Road, and Drive. You can also throw in a Crescent and a Terrace. The Streets are a separate numbering system, and run parallel to said Aves, Rd, Dr. At least the numbers are in order- other neighborhoods have non-alphabetical street names.
    Please explain streets in Brooklyn: New Utrecht Ave and Old New Utrecht Rd. I always wondered why the old and new don’t cancel each other out and just become Utrecht Rd- would save room on the street signs.

    #1395514

    lesschumras
    Participant

    WTP, that’s because New Utrecht Avenue was named after the Town of New Utrecht. Founded in 1652, it was one of six towns founded by the Dutch in Kings County ( Brooklyn ). It was,named asher the Dutch town of Utrecht

    #1395529

    Eli51
    Participant

    If someone Davens Kvasikin every day there is no Nusach Ashkenaz or Sefard Kvasikin Minyan on Shabbos as there is onlonly Sephardi ones in Kew Gardens Hills.

    #1395531

    Joseph
    Participant

    Eli, Queens is becoming increasingly Bucharian. I hear that many Ashkenazim moved out over the last several years.

    #1395537

    Sadigurarebbe
    Participant

    Brooklyn has the young ones moving out to Lakewood. Queens has the young ones moving out to the 5 Towns.

    #1395576

    yehudayona
    Participant

    Speaking of crazy street systems, Avenue R becomes Avenue O when it crosses Flatbush Avenue.

    To add to WTP’s explanation of Queens street numbers, the numbered streets also have places and lanes. Like Brooklyn, Queens was made up of several villages. Some areas have numbered streets, others don’t. Some areas just have north-south streets and east-west avenues and not all the other flavors (WTP presumably meant to say that the streets are perpendicular to the avenues). Even Queens’s well-known hyphenated house numbers aren’t universal: there are a few streets in Kew Gardens that have regular three digit numbers, and the in the Rockaways, house numbers usually aren’t hyphenated.

    #1395578

    WinnieThePooh
    Participant

    less chumras, I get New Utrecht (and New York, New Jersey, etc) it’s the Old New Utrecht that leaves me scratching my head.

    #1395601

    Joseph
    Participant

    Brooklyn has the young ones moving out to Lakewood. Queens has the young ones moving out to the 5 Towns.

    5 Towns is much more expensive than Lakewood whereas Lakewood is much frummer.

    #1395631

    Neville ChaimBerlin
    Participant

    How did we get on Lakewood?

    LB, don’t get too caught up in the banter between the Queens and Brooklyn people; they would both be good communities.

    Brooklyn is a bit more clearly divided than Queens: Crown Heights is for Lubavitchers, Flatbush is for Litvaks, and Boro Park is for Chasidim. The Queens communities are a bit more mixed I think. The language barrier would most likely be problematic for Boro Park. If you’re going down the Chabad path, you should be forewarned that Crown Heights is an extremely unsafe neighborhood. I don’t know as much about Queens, but the downside there would be that you would most likely have a longer commute.

    #1395642

    Pinchas
    Participant

    Queens has trees and grass…

    #1395659

    Joseph
    Participant

    Brooklyn has trees and grass too.

    #1395687

    yehudayona
    Participant

    Neville, your commute depends (obviously) on where you’re going, how you’re getting there, and what neighborhood you’re living in. For instance, Kew Gardens Hills has no subway stops, but Kew Gardens has the E and the F at Union Turnpike and the J and Z at 121st Street and Jamaica Avenue. The trip from Union Turnpike to 53rd and Lexington takes less than 30 minutes.

    As for the language barrier in BP, in my experience, most Chassidic women speak pretty good English. Many men don’t.

    #1395692

    Joseph
    Participant

    NCB: If BP is for Chasidim, what’s Williamsburg for?

    #1395728

    Neville ChaimBerlin
    Participant

    Satmars. Sorry I left it out.

    Knowing that the OP is a Baal Teshuva from other threads, we should be narrowing down the neighborhoods. Williamsburg would obviously not be viable; and, as I said earlier, I don’t think BP would be either. Unless lightbright is just asking out of curiosity and not considering moving to either place; that much was unclear.

    #1395835

    Joseph
    Participant

    Williamsburg has a lot more Chasidim than just Satmar. And BP has Satmar too, as well as having many non-Chasidim.

    #1396245

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Neville ChaimBerlin: Thank you for your thoughtful feedback!

    I am definitely curious, because I really don’t understand how New York works, let alone how Yidden living in New York are organized and such.

    Also asking because I am planning to visit… 🙂

    #1397227

    Joseph
    Participant

    LB: When’s the visit?

    #1400905

    Lightbrite
    Participant

    Joseph: Before Moshiach arrives… but if I’m wrong about the timing of my plans, then that’s okay too 🙂

    #1400952

    zahavasdad
    Participant

    If you want to see the Jews of NY

    walk down the following Streets

    Lee Ave between approx the BQE and Park Ave in Williamsburg Brooklyn
    13th Ave in Borough Park Brooklyn
    Avenue J and Ave M Between Ocean Parkway and Ocean Av in Flatbush Brooklyn
    Main St between Horace Harding and Union Tpke in Queens

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