How do you say Mechutanim in English?

Home Coffeeroom Shidduchim How do you say Mechutanim in English?

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  • #594393

    How do you say Mechutanim in English?

    #801121

    smartcookie
    Member

    In laws, duh!

    #801122

    Sacrilege
    Member

    Bob and Susan.

    #801123

    snapplegrl
    Member

    its not really in laws… for me (whose not married) to say my parents are machatunim with the Schwartzes… you dont say my parents inlaws are the schwartzes….. so in some contexts its not an accurate definition

    #801124

    metrodriver
    Member

    Mechutanim; If I want to be yeshivish (For a moment) I can speculate that there is no such a word in English because there is no need for it. The shaila is whether Kiddushin are “Tofeis” by b’nai Noach. Anyway. There is a movie (r”l) (Rachmono Litz’lan) with the name “The In Laws”. Starring, of course some Jewish actors. (And at least one Italian. Peter Falk.)

    #801125

    TheGoq
    Participant

    i like that one sacrilege

    #801126

    HolyMoe
    Participant

    Only Jews have a word for Mechutonim. (I speak 5 languages but correct me if I am wrong.)

    The rest of the world doesn’t see mechutonim as any relationship whatsoever.

    It is said in the name of the Baal Shem Tov that in Yenne Velt you sit not with your children or your ancestors but davka with your Mechutonim.

    (For some, this is Gan Eden.

    For others, this is Gehennom.)

    #801127

    oomis
    Participant

    In-laws is the only real expression that comes close, but I usually say to people who would not understand “machetonim,” my children’s in-laws. (For some of us the word “outlaws” will suffice – not myself, of course.)

    #801128

    Sender Av
    Member

    Sacrilege, you may have just given away your identity….

    #801129

    mewho
    Participant

    sometimes i wonder what true here and what is just for the sake of typing

    #801130

    It means trouble-makers

    #801131

    IS there a way to say it in Hebrew?

    #801132

    metrodriver
    Member

    HolyMoe; …It depends if it’s before, or after the wedding. Before.., you’re trying to impress each other. After, you (sometimes) despise each other. (Not speaking of myself.)

    #801133

    gefen
    Participant

    how about kidslaws ?

    #801134

    mewho
    Participant

    if u like em u call em in laws; if u dont like em u call em out-laws

    #801135

    deiyezooger
    Member

    How do you say “farginen” in English? Or in Hebrew?

    #801136

    metrodriver
    Member

    deiyezooger; In Hebrew, the word is “Le-Fargen”. ?????. In English, it might be to “Far-Gain”. Or. Being Magnanimous.

    #801137

    deiyezooger
    Member

    thanks Metro-d

    #801138

    zalman
    Participant

    HolyMoe in arabic it’s “conswegro”

    #801139

    oomis
    Participant

    IS there a way to say it in Hebrew? “

    THAT is THE HEBREW. Mechutanim is Hebrew for the parents of the chosson or kallah. It comes from the shoresh OF CHOSSON, Ches,Suf, Nun. We see it in the Torah by Yisro Chosein (father-in-law of) Moshe. Mother-in-law is probably choh-sen-ess. The mechutan (grammatically formed in Binyan Pu-al, which is the passive form of Binyan Pea-el and pronounced with a sefardic tuf,not suf) is the parent of one of the parties to the chasunah. Plural is mechutanim. The Yiddish pronunciation for that Hebrew word is “machetonim.” Kind of like saying Mishpoocha, for the original Hebrew “Mishpacha.”

    #801140

    Thanks oomis1105

    Would you know how to say it in english?

    #801141

    watermelon
    Member

    There is no word for “freaking out” in Hebrew.Some things just can’t be translated,I guess.

    But to be nice,I looked it up for you in the Milon.

    Mechutan:father of son-in-law

    daughter-in-law’s father

    #801142

    always here
    Participant

    machataynesta is the mother of son/dghtr-in-law

    #801143

    AinOhdMilvado
    Participant

    The best translation I’ve heard for “fargin” is to begrudge, which is sort of a combination of resent and envy.

    #801144

    AinOhdMilvado
    Participant

    I find it very interesting that one language can have a single word that might require four or five or even six words in another language.

    Machutan and machataynesta are good examples of that.

    Can anyone think of other examples?

    #801145

    Shticky Guy
    Participant

    AinOhdMilvado:

    I find it very interesting that one language can have a single word that might require four or five or even six words in another language… Can anyone think of other examples?

    How about ??????? or Bon Apetit into English

    #801146

    AinOhdMilvado
    Participant

    Shticky Guy…

    I guess that would be “Hearty Appetite!”

    #801147

    oomis
    Participant

    How about ??????? or Bon Apetit into English

    ENJOY!

    #801148

    oomis
    Participant

    The best translation I’ve heard for “fargin” is to begrudge, which is sort of a combination of resent and envy. “

    That would be “jahliver” (hope I pronounced it right).

    Fargin means the opposite or DON’T begrudge. Hence, I fargin him that he won the lottery. I just wish I had, too. You are being generous in your emotion al acceptance of someone else’s good fortune or accomplishment.

    But – She was jealous of her friend being voted in as president of the women’s club, because she jahlivered her friend’s good luck.

    #801149

    oomis
    Participant

    Shidduch Solution, I don’t think there IS an exact one-word translation. It would be one’s child’s parents-in-law.

    #801150

    Shticky Guy
    Participant

    Thats exactly my point. When have you wished someone that? You dont. You just say eat well or similar. There isnt an english equivalent in a word

    #801151

    Pinny
    Member

    Technically, in English, “in-law” means any relative through marriage. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/in+laws?

    It usually used for one’s child-in-law’s parents, but its more general definition is as in the film title “The In Laws” where it refers to the relationship between the two sets of parents (they are technically in laws to each other.)

    In Hebrew/Yiddish the term “mechutanim” is used the same way — usual usage has it meaning one’s child-in-laws parents but more generally it means one’s relatives through marriage. (“Alle mechutanim – Mazel Tov!” refers to all relatives through marriage.)

    #801152

    minyan gal
    Member

    While we are at it, could someone please tell me the Yiddish word for a floor?

    #801153

    ronrsr
    Member

    The opposition.

    #801154

    The Best Bubby
    Participant

    Most people of Polish extract say podlika, which means floor.

    #801156

    yic
    Member

    minyan gal .in yidish you say palate for a floor do any one know how you say naches in english or zat (after eating) in english its full but no word for zat i think

    #801157

    anon for this
    Participant

    AinOhdMilvado, another word that doesn’t have a one-word counterpart is “schaudenfreude”.

    #801158

    shlishi
    Member

    I think zat would translate to saturated and naches would be pride.

    #801159

    anon for this
    Participant

    shlishi, are you saying that “schaudenfreude” translates to “saturated”? Because it doesn’t.

    #801160

    am yisrael chai
    Participant

    “How do you say Mechutanim in English?”

    Me-chu-ta-nim 🙂

    (I would have included the phonetics if I could have)

    #801161

    shlishi
    Member

    No, not at all. I was responding to yic’s post immediately above yours. (Your comment wasn’t up yet when I replied.) Anyways, I specifically said “zat” translates to saturated (not schaudenfreude).

    #801162

    yic
    Member

    shlishi .pride means a sense of gavah

    #801163

    happy face
    Member

    always here, “machataynesta”. is that how you spell it??? maybe muchatenesta?? it’s such a difficult word to spell in english!! don’t you agree??

    #801164

    msseeker
    Member

    MG, ????, with a Yiddish pronunciation, is no less Yiddish than Polish-Yiddish Podloga. Let’s just call it American-Yiddish. ???, which means floor-planks, is used by old Litvak-Russians. ???????, used in Israel, refers to those bothersome tiles. IMO the most correct is ???? or ???????, which means floor in German, the ancestor of Yiddish.

    ??? = satiated. But ??? is much better. How about ???? Now that’s a stumper.

    #801165

    midwesterner
    Participant

    The word more correctly pronounced would be mechutenes. machataynesta is a kind of slang that developed from there.

    #801166

    minyan gal
    Member

    Thanks all for the various words for floor. I suppose that the word I should use is podlika as my father came from Poland. Well it was Poland at the time he lived there – the borders were rather elastic and occasionally the same area was Russia.

    #801167

    metrodriver
    Member

    msseeker; The translation for ??? (MaMash) is “Literally”, as opposed to “Figuratively”. Ex;He LITERALLY left a moment ago. ?? ??? ??? ???? ?????????????: ??? ??? ??? ?????

    #801168

    oomis
    Participant

    Mamash means something of substance, of reality.

    The word “es” in Hebrew has no exact English translation.

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