Pasuk for name

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  • #591781

    says who
    Member

    Does anyone know of a pasuk that starts with a ? and ends with a ?to say after Shmona Esra?

    Thanks

    #1083027

    jewish girl
    Member

    most sidurim have it at the end of shmonei esrei

    #1083028

    says who
    Member

    I checked a sidur and didn’t find this specific name.

    #1083029

    chesedname
    Participant

    if first letter is nun and last is ayin

    there is no posuk in tanach, sorry

    #1083030

    WolfishMusings
    Participant

    there is no posuk in tanach, sorry

    I’m not necessarily doubting you… I’m just curious how you determined that without actually going through the entire Tanach.

    The Wolf

    #1083031

    Hopefully you’ll get a reply, but it seems pretty likely that it is a computer program.

    #1083032

    chen
    Member

    It is also common to use a posuk that contains the name, if that helps.

    #1083033

    WolfishMusings
    Participant

    Hopefully you’ll get a reply, but it seems pretty likely that it is a computer program.

    I figured as much. I was hoping to actually get the name of the tool he (?) used.

    The Wolf

    #1083034

    bpt
    Participant

    This is a longshot, but are you looking for the name Nota? (That’s all that comes to mind that starts with nun and ends with ayin)

    If I’m guessing correct, Nota is usually linked to Nosson (as in Nosson Nota)and may be the yiddish version of the name. Kind of the way Yitzchok and Aazik go together.

    If that’s the case, this is the possuk for Nosson – mishlei, 20:27, Ner Hashem nishmas odom, chofesh kol chadrei boten.

    Check with a rov (or rebbe) but thats my 2 cents

    #1083035

    blinky
    Participant

    while we are on this topic can someone find me the source why we to say the pasuk for your name in shemona esrei? i always wanted to know-thanx!

    #1083036

    chesedname
    Participant

    to wolf and esteemed mod (licking up so you let my posts go through 🙂 )

    i have a sefer that lists every combination of letters and the appropriate pasuk, it said for those 2 letters no pasuk found (i added the sorry)

    i also have a sefer with every pasuk in tanach listed in alphabetical order, so in essence i can go through the whole tanach very quickly. so it’s easy to look up, i didn’t use a computer program.

    #1083037

    bpt
    Participant

    Its brought down in sefer Shla (Sheni Luchos Habris) and its a segula to help a person remember thier name when they stand before the Bes Din Shel Ma’aloh (My guess is, it only works if one takes the possuk and makes it their “mission statement”, ei, tries to live up to the directive.. but that’s also my 2 cents. Ask a rov / rebbe to hear the bigger picture)

    #1083038

    blinky
    Participant

    bp totty-thanx. Thats very interesting, but why would a person forget their name?

    #1083039

    bpt
    Participant

    Yom Hadin, as it has been described, is a frightfull event, and like many frightfull experineces, has the ability to disorient a person (as it were).

    While the full experience defies comparison, if I had to guess, imagine standing in a courtroom, and as you wait in line for your turn, you see the exacting justice the people ahead of you are getting. And as you hear the long list of wrongs read off (and realize that there was truly no excuse for any averah, no matter how good a reason they may have had), you realize that when your turn comes, you’ll most likely be in the same pickle.

    I don’t know about you, but that scene scares the wits out of me. But there is hope! As one of Am Yisroel, we have what is called zechus avos, and if you know who you are, you know who to call in for help (this is it, in a nutshell, but you get the general idea)

    Again, talk to your rov / rebbe, and if you don’t have one.. get one.. they can shed more light on this than I ever could!

    #1083040

    tzippi
    Member

    I’ve heard that if you can’t find one passuk, say two – one that starts with the first letter, the second ending with the final letter.

    #1083041

    tralala
    Member

    hamalbin pnei chaveiroi, hamalbin=whitening, when you embarass someone you’re whitening his account of aveiros and putting them on your account. When you come to beis din shel maale, they ask you all kinds of questions about these aveiros(you never did and therefor don’t recognise), you get lost about all the names involved untill you don’t even know which one belongs to you…

    #1083042

    WolfishMusings
    Participant

    When you come to beis din shel maale, they ask you all kinds of questions about these aveiros(you never did and therefor don’t recognise)

    Why would the Heavenly Court ask you about sins you did not commit?

    The Wolf

    #1083043

    squeak
    Participant

    Wolf-

    The Chofetz Chaim in sefer Shmiras Haloshon says that speaking loshon harah causes the victim’s sins to be transferred to the offender’s “account” and mutatis mutandis for the offender’s merits. I believe this is is what tralala refers to.

    #1083044

    Y.S.G.F.K.
    Member

    does any one know of a pasuk for the first name starting with a fey and the last name with a kuf??

    #1083045

    tralala
    Member

    pleasr read the first 3 lines again

    #1083046

    blinky
    Participant

    hamalbin pnei chaveiroi, hamalbin=whitening, when you embarass someone you’re whitening his account of aveiros and putting them on your account.

    #1083047

    WolfishMusings
    Participant

    The Chofetz Chaim in sefer Shmiras Haloshon says that speaking loshon harah causes the victim’s sins to be transferred to the offender’s “account” and mutatis mutandis for the offender’s merits. I believe this is is what tralala refers to.

    Fair enough. But then I would expect that a Fair Judge would not expect you to answer for a sin that you cannot answer for (because you weren’t there). IOW, if you want to say that HKBH “transfers” sins to your account for a wrong you did, then fine – but I cannot accept that He would deliberately “torment” you to answer for those sins when He knows that you cannot because you weren’t even there.

    The Wolf

    #1083048

    Rosh Cham
    Participant

    BTW any1 know a pasuk for Zusya? Zayin and Aleph?

    #1083049

    blinky
    Participant

    Im imagining it works the same way with Mitzvohs-if someone was positively affected by something that you did it will tip the scale in your favor-even though you might not recall it.

    #1083050

    This is a well established principle. The reward and punishment are transferred AS IF one himself did those acts.

    As far as I have heard they don’t ask you any questions about those acts (How could they, it is only Emes up there). The confusion comes when they mention those acts as if they were yours, yet you do not recall them.

    #1083051

    squeak
    Participant

    “I cannot accept that He would deliberately “torment” you to answer for those sins when He knows that you cannot because you weren’t even there.”

    I can’t speak with any knowledge on this, but I’m not clear that “answer for” means “tell Me why was the sin done”. In the Olam Ho’emes nothing is hidden, so the need to “answer for” is not easily understood in that sense. It is quite possible that the intent is that the ba’al loshon harah takes the consequences of the trasferred sins.

    The best would be to find the actual wording in the sefer and try to understand that instead of trying to interpret the paraphrasing that was likely done with randomness.

    #1083052

    ??? ????? ?”?:?”?

    ????? ????? ?:?”?

    That’s what my siddur has for those names. For Nata the pasuk actually ends with the word nata.

    Y.S.G.F.K.

    It doesn’t go by first and last name, it goes by first and last letter of your first name and the first and last letter of any middle names if you have them.

    #1083053

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    I’m with wolf on this. Even if you are punished as if you did that persons sins, why would you be asked about them? What is the purpose?

    Does anyone find this whole idea of aveira transfer bizarre? I wonder what it means.

    #1083054

    missme
    Member

    popa – what kind of twerp are you to argue on the Chofetz Chaim!?! Yes, aveira transfer is a very real possibility.

    #1083055

    bpt
    Participant

    I recently read an article about the Chazon Ish (or was it Rav Shach?) and the name nota was mentioned.

    He was handed a kvittle that read Nosson Nota, and said, “your real name is Nosson Dov; Nota is a nick-name.

    Not sure if this helps the OP, but just in case, this is what I found

    #1083056

    arc
    Participant

    missme he didnt question whether or not it happens but why.

    #1083057

    Feif Un
    Participant

    If you have more than one name, is the minhag to say a pasuk for each one? I’ve always said just the pasuk for my first name.

    #1083058

    arc
    Participant

    arc is my only name but considering the reason we say it I would imagine 2 pesukim are in order

    #1083059

    Sacrilege
    Member

    I say for both and then the first letter of the first name and last letter of the last. I know, massive Brisker 🙂

    #1083060

    says who
    Member

    L’meisa, My son has 3 names and Nota is his 3rd name, so he only says for the first 2 names.

    #1083061

    goldielox
    Member

    Most yiddish names dont have the pasuk in the back of the siddur cuz it usualy ends in an alef, and most hebrew names end in a hey. does any one know a pasuk for first letter gimmel and last letter alef ? ( a yiddish name).

    p.s. I think artscrollsays you can use a pasuk that has your actual name in it.

    #1083062

    deiyezooger
    Member

    Some people use a pusick with a slightly different ois e.g. a ? instead of a ?.

    #1083063

    oomis
    Participant

    I have seen Noa, a girl’s name spelled nun, vov, ayin

    #1083064

    Rak Od Pa'am
    Member

    I think artscroll says

    Reminds me of an old joke

    One of the ways to spot a BT “He thinks Artscroll was a Rishon”

    #1083065

    FrummyMcFrum
    Participant

    R’ C. Kanievsky says that one who has the name ??? ? should say ????? ??:??

    #1083066

    Feif un, Sacrilege: There is no reason or source in the Torah which indicates that we should consider two worded names as two separate entities which would require two different pesukim for each name. Since a person has a right to name himself only one name, therefore we should conclude that two worded names is actually one long name which is only written separately for clarity purposes. If this logic is correct, then the correct posuk for two or three worded names would actually be the first letter of the first name and the last letter of the last name.

    #1083067

    theprof1
    Participant

    Lomed you basically have no idea what you’re talking about. There are some 2 names that are joined together sometimes, if the person wants to. For example, Dov Ber is generally joined as Dovber or Duber by Lubavitchers. But a name like Binyomin Zev or Arye Leib or Shraga Feivel, although the 2nd name is basically a translation such as Dov Ber, these names are always separate. The Torah can’t be considered an authority for giving names. There’s no halocho mamish for that. Also, people generally have a wrong idea of what 2 or 3 names in Judaism signify. Goyim have a 1st name and a 2nd name and often the 2nd name signifies something. Italian Catholics give a 1st name which is their birth name and the middle name is called a religious name, Often their saints etc, such as Michael. Irish Catholics generally give the 2nd name as a family last name, such as the mother’s maiden name, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, et al. When we give 2 or 3 names, they aren’t “middle” names. Each is a name. It’s almost as if we have only one 1st name which consists of 2 or 3 names. The minhag of saying a posuk, which is clearly for “remembering” your name after death in Beis Din shel maloh, should cover each name that a person has with a posuk. How that’s done can be in several ways. The way most people do is with a clear posuk with the 1st ois and last ois the same in the name and the posuk. If there is no posuk, then just figure something out to compensate. This whole idea is only a segulah to remembering. So use the segulah to the best of your ability.

    #1083068

    Sacrilege
    Member

    I guess its a good thing then that my first name (which I dont go by) that is Yiddish we spell incorrectly and end off with a “Hey” so that I dont run into any problems 🙂

    #1083069

    Therefore, since we don’t have any halachic source which implies that one may have two separate halchically recognized names, then obviously the two worded names which you mentioned that you consider two separate names, are actually halachically recognized as one long name (with which he is recognized in Heaven), only that it might be spelled separately which has no significance in halacha.

    #1083070

    theprof1
    Participant

    Sac, there are several Yiddish names that actually have different meaning when spelled with a heh or an alef at the end. The name Faige or Faiga is spelled with a heh or alef or ayin at the end. When spelled with an alef or ayin the name Faige means Fig. When spelled with a heh at the end it means Bird. The name Faigl can mean either.

    #1083071

    says who
    Member

    Lomed Mkol Adam

    I don’t begin to understand your logic.

    There is no source in the Torah that 2 names are considered 1 name, therfore it must be that they are 2 seperate names, HA?

    #1083072

    Sacrilege
    Member

    prof

    I’m pretty sure this one only has one meaning…

    #1083073

    Says Who: Since we don’t find in the Torah such a concept that one may have two separately recognized names, therefore the proof lies on the one who is being “mechadesh” that there does exist such status in halacha. “Hamotzei M’chaveiro alav Haraya”.

    I don’t see why we should need proof to imply that two worded names are recognized as one long name in halacha, since this is consistent with the Torah concept of one name per one person; and that which the names are spelled separately is insignificant in halacha and can hardly be counted as proof.

    #1083074

    says who
    Member

    The fact that we don’t find in the Torah 2 names doesn’t force you to say that if someone give 2 names it is considered as 1 name. You cannot bring a Rayeh from the torah either way.

    BTW How many names did Yisro have?

    #1083075

    Says Who: Many times in the Torah and Na”ch the posuk may refer to someone in different places by different names, and then the Midrash will explain which name is his real one and which is only a nickname, and why the Posuk gave him/her that particular nickname. For example, Sara/Yiscah, Hagar/Ketura, Haman/Memuchan; the real name is Sara and her nickname given by the Torah was Yiskah for the reasons stated by Rash”i. I guess according to these midrashim, we would have to conclude that Yisro had one real name and the others were only nicknames.

    Obviously when one names his child two worded names, his intention is that they both be considered his real name, and to make that possible we would have to halachically recognize both words as one long name, even though other people may have used each word separately on two different people.

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