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  • #2099913
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    According to the Rav Abarbanel and Maasei Hashem they should have not publicized their findings as they were responsible to Moshe Rabbenu sending them as it says shelach ‘lecha’. They also emphasized the negative by saying good but bad rather than saying bad but good. The Rav Malbim explains the difference between ויתורו and וירגלו. The original intention of Moshe Rabbenu was that each shevat should look at the positive qualities, what they like. This was the reason why each shevat was sent. However, they switched their mission looking for bad qualities, what they didn’t like. Moshe Rabbenu wanted them to realize that they need the help of Hashem and they cannot conquer EY by themselves because they are strong.

    #2102080
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Korach: The Right Man for the Job

    What reasons did Korach give for why he should be Kohen Gadol instead of Ahron? He complained that all the honor and glory was going to Moshe and his family, and that Korach’s family should have been in line for the next open position.

    However, there is one point Korach did not address. He made no argument that Ahron wasn’t fit for the job, or why he would make a better Kohen Gadol. Korach was apparently not concerned with who the best man for the job was. He just wanted it for himself.

    Contrast this with the attitude of Moshe. In last weeks Parsha, Moshe receives a Nevuah that he will die in the desert, having failed to bring Bnei Yisroel to their destination. But Moshe was not perturbed-מי יתן כל עם ה׳ נביאים. Moshe wanted the best man to get the job, regardless of that was him or not.

    This is a pretty easy way to gauge whether we are looking out for the greater good, or just in it for ourselves. If we find ourselves asking “who would do the best job”, we’re asking the right question. But when that becomes “why not me?”, we should check our motives.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #2102170
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    I asked the above question from Rav Shafran, as Korach argued that everyone is holy, so what makes him better than anyone else? He told me that when one has self interest they will not argue logically.

    #2104259
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Chukas: Speak Softly & Drop the Stick

    We know that when Moshe hit the rock, instead of talking to it as Hashem had instructed, he was no longer allowed to enter Eretz Yisroel. But the reason given seems somewhat puzzling: “יען לא האמנתם בי”, because you did not cause Bnei Yisroel to believe in Me. What exactly was the lesson that the Jewish people was supposed to have learnt from witnessing Moshe talk to the rock that they didn’t see from him hitting the rock?

    The Mahral explains that if the rock would have given water simply by request, Klal Yisroel would have seen a model image of Avodas Hashem: you should do what Hashem wants, because you want to do what Hashem wants you to do.

    Instead, by seeing Moshe angrily hitting the rock, they were shown a very different image: of doing what Hashem said because you feel you have no choice, due to either threats or rewards that you just can’t ignore.

    This difference in attitudes is so critical, writes the Mahral, that it is part of the very definition of Emunah. כי אין אמונה רק שיהיה” דרך רצון ושמחה” – the only way of serving Hashem with Emunah, is do so voluntarily and joyfully.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #2104261
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant
    #2106235
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Balak: Blame Game

    Why did Hashem prevent Bilum from cursing Bnei Yisroel? Hashem controls the world, and nothing Bilum or anybody else says can force Hashem to do anything. Why didn’t Hashem let Bilum curse us, and just ignore him?

    The Chida quotes R’ Shlomo Astruk as explaining what the problem would have been. If Bilum had cursed Bnei Yisroel, Bnei Yisroel would have blamed any suffering or misfortune that occurred to them as being the result of Bilum’s curse, without considering whether their suffering was actually caused by their own actions.

    Pain is often Hashem’s way of sending us messages about what it is that we need to do better. If we blame others for the situation we find ourselves in instead of considering that what is happening to us is primarily the result of our own actions, we will never be able to fix the true root of the problem.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #2106263
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    We got the greatest brachas from Bilam which we would have never gotten. Hashem showed His great love to us by reversing Bilom’s curses to blessings. Hashem wanted to show that Bilom accomplished with his curses the opposite. The speaking of the donkey reflects this. Even a donkey can speak when Hashem wants it to. Bilom was only able to speak what Hashem wanted him to say. Hashem can give water from the rock, blessings from the wicked.

    #2108002
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Pinchos: Admit It

    There were 24,000 people who died in a plague, all of whom had allowed themselves to be enticed by the daughters of Midyan. Why is Zimri specifically singled out for condemnation?

    R’ Yosef Chaim Zonnenfeld explains that Zimri did not just make a mistake. Zimri publicly sought to justify his actions, and to convince others to do as he had done.

    Zimri ridiculously compared his actions to that of Moshe, who married a giyores. Zimri proudly paraded his sinful actions in the heart of the camp, trying to sway others his way.

    We all make mistakes. But we need to make sure that our failings do not dilute our ideals. We always need to recognize what is right and what is wrong, but never more so than after we’ve crossed that line. Don’t let your failings redefine you.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #2108078
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    When you believe that you are right like Korach and Zimri over here, you will never do teshuva,

    #2112253
    Zugger613
    Participant

    Devarim: Channeling Tragedy

    Rashi explains why it is that Moshe chose this moment to rebuke Bnei Yisroel for all the mistakes they had made over the past 40 years. Moshe knew that he was about to die, and that this was the most opportune time to correct all the mistakes of the past.

    The Ksav Sofer further explains that when we are happily going about our regular lives, without any major challenges or issues, it can be very difficult for us to change ourselves. We feel comfortable, and we can feel complacent.

    But when tragedy strikes, it tends to jolt us out of our regular routine. We suddenly realize how little in life is certain, and we can be far more open to changing our ways.

    When Moshe was about to pass away, he knew that Bnei Yisroel would be uniquely attentive to what he had to say, and would be far more open to changing their ways.

    לע״נ דוד חיים בן ישראל דוב הכהן
    לע״נ ר׳ חיים דוב בן ר׳ בןציון שלום

    #2112339
    Reb Eliezer
    Participant

    The Ksav Sofer needs some explanation what tragedy personally struck them? When Moshe Rabbenu was passing away, the Jews realized that life is temporary and even a tzadik does not live forever, so it reminded them of their day of demise. Therefore, it brought them to teshuva by willing to accept mussar more easily.

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