Supper side dishes

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  • #592861

    crdle
    Member

    besides for the basic potato, rice or pasta what other side dishes do u ppl make/have every night?

    #705803

    blinky
    Participant

    Stir fry veggies! Sweet potato is also good.

    #705804

    WolfishMusings
    Participant

    Bread.

    Last week I made a nice minestrone soup with semolina bread for my family.

    Considering all the compliments and the fact that everyone in the family requested that I make it again, I’d say it was a hit.

    The Wolf

    #705805

    theprof1
    Participant

    Asparagus – plain boiled or steamed. Roasted with olive oil and garlic. Sauteed with bread crumbs.

    Broccoli spears or florets – same as asparagus.

    So many squashes to make in so many ways.

    You can buy kosher brussels sprouts. You can make cooked cabbage in veggie soup and slice the whole cabbage.

    Peas and carrots straight from the can. Green beans from the can. Snap peas any way.

    That should last you a few weeks.

    #705806

    SJSinNYC
    Member

    A variety of vegetables:

    sauteed zucchini

    baked sweet potatoes

    roasted peppers

    steamed or baked broccoli

    Creamed spinach

    salad (any variety)

    Corn on the cob

    Carrots

    Acorn, butternut or spaghetti squash

    Roasted beets

    Mashed parsnips

    Sauteed green beans

    Mushrooms

    If you are looking for grain/starch alternatives, try:

    Couscous

    Bulger

    Lentils (not quite the same but…)

    #705807

    squeak
    Participant

    Wolf, I thought you were going to say Lamb πŸ˜‰

    How does Salmonella get on bread?

    #705808

    WolfishMusings
    Participant

    Wolf, I thought you were going to say Lamb πŸ˜‰

    Although I’ve eaten AT Wolf & Lamb before, I have never actually eaten lamb.

    The Wolf

    #705809

    theprof1
    Participant

    Squeak, semolina, the wheat flour used to make pasta. Wolf you actually make your own bread from that, wow, impressive. Must take great with soup. mmmm pasta fajoul with spinata.

    #705810

    WolfishMusings
    Participant

    Squeak, semolina, the wheat flour used to make pasta. Wolf you actually make your own bread from that, wow, impressive. Must take great with soup.

    Only once. Last week was the first time I tried making bread. It turned out to be a hit.

    This week, I get to make the challah (along with the rest of the food) for Shabbos, because Eeees is studying for some big exams. While I’ve made almost everything else for Shabbos, this will be my first stab at challah baking (and the first time I’ll ever be mafrish challah in my life).

    The Wolf

    #705811

    LAer
    Member

    Try the popcorn cauliflower from Kosher by Design Entertains. It’s delicious! And try mixing up your “basic potato, rice or pasta” by making sesame noodles instead of plain spaghetti, couscous or orzo instead of rice (or sautee some onions and mushrooms and add to plain rice), make potato wedges, french fries, or a different kind of potatoes than you usually make (mashed, baked, scalloped, roasted, etc.).

    #705812

    ronrsr
    Member

    quinoa – (pronounced keen-wah) a nice grain substitute, very nutritious, very high in protein, and most important, very tasty.

    #705813

    blinky
    Participant

    Nice ideas LAer. Also cabbage and noodles/potatos are other ways to add to regular pasta and potato dishes

    #705814

    arc
    Participant

    I had Quinoa for the first time last week, I didnt like it.

    sweet potatoes, brocolli, spinach and mixed sauteed veggies are hits in my house.

    #705815

    LAer
    Member

    Oh, and I forgot about a new noodle recipe – I just got it from a friend of mine and it’s great! Good cold (but I like it better hot), and can be served with milchigs or fleishigs. Sautee 2 zucchini, 1 onion, and a few cloves of garlic in olive oil, spice with seasoned salt, pepper, garlic powder and onion powder to taste, then mix with cooked bowtie noodles. For milchig meals, add parmesan cheese on top.

    #705816

    smartcookie
    Member

    I make Kasha alot and I see no one has mentioned it. Am I cooking weird stuff??

    #705817

    blinky
    Participant

    smartcookie- no kasha is not weird its just i wouldn’t think to put it as a side dish to chicken or fish…

    #705818

    ronrsr
    Member

    arc – you must rinse the quinoa carefully before cooking it (or buy pre-rinsed quinoa) — otherwise it will have a bitter taste. It should have a pleasant, nutty taste.

    #705819

    arc
    Participant

    it was catered so I assume they did it right.

    #705820

    Sacrilege
    Member

    Quinoa smells like feet.

    #705821

    ronrsr
    Member

    NO, that’s not correct. Feet smell like quinoa.

    #705822

    AinOhdMilvado
    Participant

    To: ronrsr and arc…

    I think quinoa smells a little bit like corn on the cob.

    In any case it does not have too much tastE on it’s own (just like couscous or rice), BUT you can flavor it as you like… i.e. salt, pepper, garlic powder, and/or sauteed onions give it great flavor.

    You can eat it as a breakfast cereal and add some cinnamon and the fruit of your choice (I like blueberries).

    As ronrsr said, it is very nutritious, and has a very low glycemic index, meaning the carbs/sugar/energy enter your system VERY slowly making it good for diabetics and a great food for before a fast!!!

    #705823

    ronrsr
    Member

    and it’s chometz-free!

    I like it for dinner with a bit of ketchup mixed in. Or for breakfast, in soy or almond milk.

    #705824

    ronrsr
    Member

    also, quinoa comes in white, black and red varieties, to suit your pallette as well as your palate.

    #705825

    crdle
    Member

    Y’all have gr8 ideas, but I already do what u ppl said. I make all types of potatoes and sweet potatoes, I make rice, orzo, noodles, spaghetti etc… Kinua- tastes gross to me ,

    LAer- gr8 idea with the zucchini- I’ll try it. thansk

    #705826

    arc
    Participant

    I hear that it’s officially kosher l’pesach.

    To me, it doesnt feel kosher l’pesach so I wouldn’t eat it. I will try it again.

    #705827

    AinOhdMilvado
    Participant

    arc…

    Its definitely not chametz because it is not one of the five grains.

    Whether or not rabanim might put it in the category of kitniyos, I don’t know. L’fi aniyas da’ati I would think not. I’ve read that botanically its in the same category as spinach.

    #705828

    Sacrilege
    Member

    ainohd

    Its actually classified as a berry. My father wont let us serve it because he says we never had it before we arent starting now (which is MORE than fine by me)

    #705829

    Quinoa

    a species of goosefoot (Chenopodium), is a grain-like crop grown primarily for its edible seeds. It is a pseudocereal rather than a true cereal, or grain, as it is not a member of the grass family. As a chenopod, quinoa is closely related to species such as beets, spinach, and tumbleweeds. Its leaves are also eaten as a leaf vegetable, much like amaranth, but the commercial availability of quinoa greens is currently limited.

    #705830

    arc
    Participant

    again to me it feels and looks like a food we dont eat on pesach. my mother would find it ironic that I’m saying this because she always said that in regards to garlic and coke etc. which drove me nuts.

    #705831

    oomis
    Participant

    Quinoa is not kitniyos, BUT – in order to be chametz-free, I was told it has to be grown somewhere that is not near chametzdig grains. Some rabbonim therefore hold it should not be used on Pesach, but others who have checked it out, will allow certain brands to be used. It’s kind of like how mushrooms need a special hechsher for Pesach.

    My husband likes it, but it makes me barf. Though it looks somewhat like cous cous (which I do like), it has a weird texture and taste, even when prepared properly by an appetizing store, that I just cannot warm up to (sorry for splitting my infinitives, again).

    #705832

    squeak
    Participant

    Explain how quinoa is NOT kitniyot, please?

    #705833

    from kashrut.com

    #705836

    Pashuteh Yid
    Member

    One point of advice. When looking to lose weight, watch what skinny people eat. I have noticed at work that quite a few skinnny oriental types eat huge bowls of meat and rice with other veggies for lunch. They are far from going hungry, yet stay skinny. This leads me to believe that rice is less fattening than say pasta.

    #705837

    smartcookie
    Member

    Blinky- why not?

    #705838

    blinky
    Participant

    I don’t know maybe because i usually have it for breakfast. Its funny for me to put it next to my chicken (especially cuz i like it with milk) But if you like it, good for you! its probably better than some other starchy side dish:)

    #705839

    smartcookie
    Member

    Breakfast? WOW! We love it with the sauce of the chicken on it!

    enjoy it!

    #705840

    blinky
    Participant

    No kidding! How do you make it just regular with salt and pepper or is there more to it?

    #705841

    WIY
    Member

    Sacrilege

    Again with the smells πŸ™‚ you must have a sensitive nose.

    #705842

    Quinoa is also great for those on a gluten free diet.I saute chopped veggies,mix of peepers,onions & mushrooms or use whatever you have on hand in olive oil add a cup of quinoa and 2 cups water season with salt and ground black pepper. Great as a side or add lots more veggies and crusty rolls as a light parve meal.Quinoa unlike most grains is a complete protein

    #705843

    grafpatotsky
    Participant

    melava malka is always like in the alte heim – herring and kartoshkes….. yumm!!!

    #705844

    smartcookie
    Member

    No pepper just salt.

    I usually cook Kasha when I have a good tasty cooked chicken and I use the sauce of the chicken to pour over the Kasha when serving it.

    #705845

    blinky
    Participant

    hmmm sounds interesting- maybe ill try it (that is if my family would let me try something new:)

    #705846

    AinOhdMilvado
    Participant

    Make it for breakfast pretty much the same as you would make oatmeal. Boil a pot of water, put in the quinoa, keep on low heat to let it simmer (i.e. a low boil) for 10-15 minutes, and drain off any excess (unabsorbed) water.

    Then you can add a little sugar (or splenda) and sliced banana, blueberries, or whatever fruit you like! YUMMY!

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