The new Avrohom fried-the name bring down the house is a very goyish term

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Viewing 22 posts - 1 through 22 (of 22 total)
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  • #617879

    moishy1998
    Participant

    A new cd came out called bring down the house …how can we listen to this just the name of it isn’t right it’s very goyish and then to tie it into the bais hamikdash!?

    #1157370

    catch yourself
    Participant

    It actually comes straight out of the Gemara… “?????? ?????”

    ( although I’m sure that’s not the meaning he intended…)

    #1157371

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    Comes from when shimshon brought down the house on the plishtim.

    #1157372

    so Boycott it

    #1157373

    moishy1998
    Participant

    The intended meaning was definitely the non Jewish term of bring the house down

    #1157374

    kapusta
    Participant

    Is that in your opinion or have you asked Avraham Fried what he meant? And have you heard the song?

    #1157375

    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    You assumed that because you’re so completely steeped in goyish culture.

    Pot calling the tablecloth black.

    #1157376

    Sam2
    Participant

    Also, what’s wrong with using an English (Goyish) phrase to refer to good things? Is every phrase in a non-Hebrew/Yiddish/Judeo-Arabic/Ladino language inherently a bad thing? I see you posting in English, don’t I?

    #1157385

    👑RebYidd23
    Participant

    This phrase refers to getting approval from the audience, which is a terrible thing for a singer. Singers should always do the right thing and sing the right songs regardless of what the audience wants. After all, the audience are only paying customers.

    #1157386

    golfer
    Participant

    Every time I pass by for a visit I learn something new.

    I should not listen to Av Fried’s new CD.

    I may of course continue to get on the internet and meander around the CR. And perhaps several other venues.

    #1157387

    ☕ DaasYochid ☕
    Participant
    #1157388

    Geordie613
    Participant

    There’s plenty of meises about taking the words of simple people and ascribing higher meaning to them. Two examples spring to mind.

    “Vi lang der lechtele brent, kennen mir farichten”

    “Katerina, maleditza, pode suder”

    And besides, I won’t hear a bad word spoken about R’ Avremel, ever since he was my camp counsellor in Gan Yisroel, Johannesburg in 1981.

    #1157389

    YW fan
    Participant

    moishy1998, no idea how you can be so confident with that comment!

    #1157390

    apushatayid
    Participant

    The album cover contradicts moishy1998’s contention. the true intentions of the lyrics would have to be explained by the songs composer, not singer. I dont believe they are one and the same. See the accompanying literature that comes with the physical CD.

    #1157391

    Rabbi of Crawley
    Participant

    moishy , you need to be married to comment here

    #1157392

    jhonny appleseed
    Participant

    there were many rebbes who used to take non-jewish tunes and use them and by such a holy person singing them it highered it on kedusha levels.

    #1157393

    Moshe1994
    Participant

    I wonder which crime is worse; the name of the CD or harming someone’s Parnasa…

    #1157394

    ☕ DaasYochid ☕
    Participant

    STOP THE LASHON HARA!!!!

    It’s free advertising. I think moishy1998 should get commission.

    #1157395

    golfer
    Participant

    Geordie6, I’m here to learn something new again.

    Can you explain the quote you posted,

    “Katerina, maleditza….”

    What language is that?

    And what does it mean?

    …Just asking because the one about the lechtele burning is one of my personal favorites. Curious to know what this one is all about. Yiddish it’s for sure not. And the story behind it I certainly don’t know.

    #1157396

    oomis
    Participant

    I think the original comment refers to the story of Shimshon. I am with Popa on this one.

    #1157397

    Geordie613
    Participant

    Golfer,

    It seems I thought it was more well known. In very short, it’s a song called Ani Ba’yaar holachti. And the version I know, was sung by Rav Yaacov Salzer Zt”l in Johannesburg. The story is about someone walking in the forest and heard a peasant calling his/her daughter, Katerina, young lady,come here. In that language it’s “Katerina, maleditza, podusodoy” or something like that. So the song is understanding those words to mean that Hashem will come and redeem His people and we will all sing together.

    Kat is a group

    Rina is song

    Male is full

    Ditza is joy

    Poide is redeem

    Sodoy is the shem Shin, dalet and yud.

    I’m sure it’s available on the popular search engines…

    #1157398

    golfer
    Participant

    Thank you Geordie613!

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