Wearing a Yarmulka in Shul Only

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  • #1388870

    slominer
    Participant

    I noticed some people, or people in some Shuls, only wear a Yarmulka in Shul. The Shul has a box of Yarmulkas when you walk in. Is this some kind of minhag of people who don’t wear Yarmulkas all day long or are these people not very observant?

    #1388940

    iacisrmma
    Participant

    It’s not a minhag. They are usually people who are not “observant”.

    #1388954

    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    Even a frum shul normally has a box of yarmulkes by the door for “guests” (typically of a baal simcha) who may either be Reform or non-frum) who either don’t have or who have forgotten a “kipa”. I rarely see it in smaller shtieblach since the guests of the baal simchas are heimish and will have a hat or kipa. I rarely see a regular at the shul criticize or shame someone who walks in w/o a yarmulke.

    #1388962

    Takes2-2tango
    Participant

    If youve ever been at the kotel, theres a box of kipot there too . Its nothing new and its not a minhag. Its called respect.

    #1388966

    Joseph
    Participant

    Although the OP is referring to Modern Orthodox shuls that have Yarmulka boxes for the non-observant Ashkenazim davening in MO shuls, I think there are still some observant Sephardim who don’t wear a Yarmulka throughout the day, but do for davening.

    #1389034

    iacisrmma
    Participant

    Joseph: I agree but with a caveat. Sephardim generally wear a kippah for davening and eating (from what I recall they are strict to wear a kippah when making brachot).

    GH: I grew up in a Young Israel shul where many members were not observant and we needed to keep both kippot and talleisim in the hallway of the shul. As you stated, I never recall anybody being criticized for not having their own kippah or tallis.

    To answer the OP, I stated they are likely less observant then those who always come to shul but out of respect (as T22T commented) will wear it for religious functions inside of a shul. The OP use of the word “minhag” is inappropriate for this situation.

    #1389046

    CTLAWYER
    Participant

    The shul I grew up in had the custom that hats were not worn in davening, only yarmulkes. Some members who wore caps all day at work would arrive in shul, remove their caps, don a yarmulke from the box and daven. After davening they’d reverse the process.

    #1389108

    MDG
    Participant

    “I think there are still some observant Sephardim who don’t wear a Yarmulka throughout the day, but do for davening.”

    While the Sh”A says not to walk 4 Amot with one’s head uncovered, the beit yosef says that is a midat chassidut.

    #1389111

    iacisrmma
    Participant

    ctl: I took the question from the OP as the men were totally bareheaded; no hats or caps. I also remember a story about a lawyer who came into shul and started davening without a hat or cap. His fellow mispallelim were startled. He couldn’t figure out what was wrong until he realized that he was wearing his toupee, which he wore because they did not allow him to wear a kippah in the office.

    #1389112

    akuperma
    Participant

    Wearing a yarmulke in public (kal-ve-homer a tallis katan, beard and pe’os, or for a woman a modest outfit and a hair covering) exposes one to significant discrimination (and in some places, though not the US, exposes one to potentially lethal violence). Many people who are somewhat observant (and sometimes, actually frum) are afraid to express their Jewishness in public.

    #1389439

    Joseph
    Participant

    At one time in the not too distant past, many non-observant Jews (in the U.S.) identified with Orthodoxy; and when they attended shul, they attended an Orthodox shul. I’m not sure that today many non-observant Jews still identify with Orthodoxy.

    #1389469

    Mammele
    Participant

    Joseph: I believe for the most part, Russian Jews identify with (Jewish) Orthodoxy.

    #1389491

    Neville ChaimBerlin
    Participant

    CTLawyer: That’s called chukas hagoyim.

    #1389489

    shuali
    Participant

    “While the Sh”A says not to walk 4 Amot with one’s head uncovered, the beit yosef says that is a midat chassidut”
    The midat chassidut is to not go bareheaded even while still.

    #1389693

    Gadolhadorah
    Participant

    When I grew up, the boys generally wore various kinds of caps (like the ones all the goyim wore in the movies from the 1930s and 40s) outside of yeshiva. Today, its either yamulkes or baseball hats. Back then I recall there was considerably greater concern about “standing out” whereas b’h today’s yeshiva and day school kids (not black hatters) wear their yarmulkes with no concern

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