What Is a Tuna Bagel?

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  • #703795

    toona beigel
    Member

    A tuna maidel is a girl or women and a tuna beigel is a boy or a man who is a trying hard chassid! Lol

    #703796

    Gabby
    Member

    I’ve heard of this expression once and it was not directed at me. I had no idea what it meant and apparently no one else does because based on reading these posts, everyone has different opinions. Labeling is VERY HARMFUL! People obviously take it in different ways and can be hurt by tactless people. It lowers girls (and maybe guys’) self esteem. You all seem so concerned with Lashon Hara and labeling is stereotyping and lashon hara. If you say it to their face, I don’t think anyone will take it positively. And if you say it behind their back, it’s definitely lashon hara.

    “So many people in America watch so carefully about what they put in their mouth, but don’t pay attention to what comes out of it”

    #703797

    lavdavka
    Member

    it seams every one is scaared to say what itis so ill say it its a chassidisha guy trying to be cool but b/c of the chassidisha way of sheltering there children. they (the tuna beigel) have no idea how to do it. and its prety funny watching them b/c they way over do things

    #703798

    chofetzchaim
    Member

    oomis1105:

    Calling someone a fruitcake is VERY uncomplimentary – means he is a nut job!

    What’s so uncomplimentary about being a nut job? Some people consider that the biggest compliment!

    A friend of mine’s mother once said about her son, “He’s a fruitcake, but that’s good because I like fruitcake”

    #703799

    oomis
    Participant

    CC, they may feel that way, and more power to them, but the expression fruitcake and nut job both are accepted vernacular expressions saying that someone is crazt. Period. So whether or not you like nuts and fruitcake, it is very uncomplimentary to call someone that, by most people’s standards.

    #703800

    chofetzchaim
    Member

    Some people use terms like “crazy”, “nuts”, “fruitcake”, to mean that the guy is a great, outgoing, out-of-the-box guy. It all depends on the context and tone in which it is said.

    BTW,

    What’s the fastest way to order a sandwich? Call Hatzolah- you’ll get a Tuna Beigel in seconds!

    #703801

    myfriend
    Member

    In general society, calling someone a fruitcake means they are a toeiva’nik.

    #703802

    WIY
    Member

    myfriend:

    That or just very odd or strange.

    #703803

    WIY
    Member

    chofetzchaim:

    That comment about Hatzolah is so off base. Most Hatzalah people I know are regular Heimish family people many with married kids. Maybe you mean shomrim.

    #703804

    chesedname
    Participant

    interesting that the mods let this blatant, untrue MOTZEI SHEM RAH, LOSHON HARAH through, and when i asked someone where he got his halacha from they deleted it, hmmmmm

    quote I’m talking about

    “What’s the fastest way to order a sandwich? Call Hatzolah- you’ll get a Tuna Beigel in seconds! “

    #703805

    WIY
    Member

    chesedname:

    I agree there seems to be some selective modding around here.

    #703807

    fabie
    Member

    Love that term. Do you have any more goodies for us seniors.

    #703808

    chofetzchaim- how could you call yourself that when you publicly post lashon hara? I am appalled!

    #703809

    hashem should never give you a chance to need hatzala, but I bet if they saved your mother or baby, you would have something very different chofetzchaim!

    #703812

    blinky
    Participant

    I notice many of such boys are the ones that block entrances to vorts and weddings while smoking and staring at e/o who comes in-which make it impossible for ladies to come in and out without having any physical contact with them. Its a shame.

    #703813

    mchemtob
    Member

    I now kow what a tuna beigel is but can someone tell me what a tinkleberry is. I was in bp and someone says to her freind “could you belice “faigy” is married already who knew they guy would be a tinkleberry? could someone please explain. I think ther berry part refers to a bleckberry but whats the rest mean?

    #703814

    chesedname
    Participant

    WellInformedYid

    thank you, glad someone sees it!

    #703816

    funny613
    Member

    “Labels are for cans not for people”

    #703817

    philosopher
    Member

    “Labels are for cans not for people”

    Excellent remark. I detest this fruitcake, tuna bagel/biegal and tinkelberry stuff.

    #703818

    bpt
    Participant

    Tinkleberry more than likley refers to the newly minted yingerman’s obsession with his blackberry. Being seen with one as a bochur would’ve scuttled his shidduch options, but now that he’s post chasseneh, he can show his true colors.

    #703819

    bpt
    Participant

    As far as lables go, true its not fair to label someone as a “dummy” or “lazy” or any of the other lables that society sometimes puts on a person. But when someone does thier utmost to cultvate a certain look or perception (like lights and sirens on a tricked out SUV that makes a presidental motorcade look lame) there’s nothing wrong with it.. its a complement!

    I agree, its wrong to make a blanket statement about all Hatzoloh members, but lets be fair; they do have their share of coyboys. Don’t believe me? Ask a hatzoloh memeber who responds to the 3am calls. He will tell you that there are members who only respond when the public can see and gawk at the jaw-dropping arrival.

    As you can tell, I live in Tuna-bagel country, so I know and love these guys like brothers. They don’t take kindly to being called such to their faces, but boy do they love having all heads (mine included) turn to see them tear down the avenue, lights ablaze!

    Its not a label, its a brand name!

    #703820

    WIY
    Member

    philosopher:

    What about Chasidish, Yeshivish, Heimish, Litvish, Modernish, Yekkish….?

    #703821

    philosopher
    Member

    What about Chasidish, Yeshivish, Heimish, Litvish, Modernish, Yekkish….?

    Okay, let me modify my previous comment. I hate it when labels that should be used on containers, cans, and packages is used on people.

    I think there on enough real adjectives in the English language that can appropriately be used to describe people who are humans beings and not objects and should not be labeled as objects.

    #703822

    philosopher
    Member

    Btw, WIY, I think you would agree with me that we shouldn’t call OTD’s pasta shells, meaning they’re empty of substance on the inside. Why do we allow ourselves to apply lesser standards of kovod habriyos to frum people?

    #703823

    apushatayid
    Participant

    just call everyone “a fellow yid”.

    #703824

    philosopher
    Member

    just call everyone “a fellow yid”.

    There’s nothing wrong with these labels Chasidish, Yeshivish, Heimish, Litvish, Modernish, Yekkish….

    There is something wrong with these lables fruitcake, tuna bagel, tinkleberry, pasta shell…

    #703825

    apushatayid
    Participant

    “There’s nothing wrong with these labels Chasidish, Yeshivish, Heimish, Litvish, Modernish, Yekkish….”

    Aside from the fact that they are usually wrong, and often used in a deragatory manner, your right, there is nothing wrong with them.

    #703826

    apushatayid
    Participant

    “There’s nothing wrong with these labels Chasidish, Yeshivish, Heimish, Litvish, Modernish, Yekkish….

    There is something wrong with these lables fruitcake, tuna bagel, tinkleberry, pasta shell…”

    There is also nothing wrong with “a fellow yid”.

    #703827

    says who
    Member

    apushatayid

    Imagine someone reading a shidduch to a Litvish(fellow yid) to a chassidish(fellow yid) and they go on a date and when afterwards they call the shadchan and say I told you I only want to go out with a ……I guess he should say a fellow yid.

    #703828

    oomis
    Participant

    Any label that is used in a derogatory manner, is a bad one (even call a girl a princess).

    #703829

    artchill
    Participant

    oomis:

    Any name or label that an HR department would investigate you for, shouldn’t be used.

    #703830

    apushatayid
    Participant

    Sayswho. Labels means nothing more than what the person using them intend it to mean.

    Please define Yeshivish, Heimish and Modernish. Now, compare your definition with 10 other people who will also attempt to define them as well.

    #703831

    There is not an exact co-incidence between the label and the concept, as in almost any definition you can think of. Still there is a general utility in using those particular words. Certainly if you say yeshivish it will conjure up quite a different image in the listener’s mind than if you say modernish. Exactly what image will be conjured up will be somewhat different for each listener, still there will likely be a great deal of similarity as well, in most cases.

    To argue that those labels have no meaning or are useless is ridiculous. To say that they are subject to misinterpretation, or they may have negative connotations, and/or they should not be used is something else.

    #703833

    apushatayid
    Participant

    Mod 80. So, you admit use of those terms conjures up images in the minds of the speaker as well as the listener. Those images may get you into the ballpark, but may or may not put you in the right section, and likely doesn’t put you in the correct seat, yet, we should use them?

    What image is conjured up in your mind if I told you “ploni was modern”. I asked a fellow sitting on the train next to me and he came up with “small leather kippa, polo shirt, definitely does not wear a hat on shabbos and usually goes by his legal name (as opposed to the name he was called by his bris). Others on YWN in various posts have labeled anyone who doesn’t wear a white button down shirt, as modern. Still others claim you are “modern” because you grew up davening in a Young Israel (a label stuck on me when I was in shidduchim, for some reason my blue shirt didn’t have me labeled modern, perhaps it was because of the name of my yeshiva?). I’m curios what you and some other readers here would say.

    #703834

    I repeat what I said. Like any descriptive term (label), they are not exact, yet they have some usefulness.

    If you think their inexactness is dangerous enough to outweigh their communication lubrication, then don’t use them.

    #703835

    philosopher
    Member

    apushetayid, so if someone wants to know if a person is Chassidish or Yeshivish for a reason that not necassarily negative is it wrong to say “no, he’s not Yeshivish, he’s Chassidish”?

    #703836

    oomis
    Participant

    artchill – ITA

    #703837

    apushatayid
    Participant

    Mod80. I dont use the terms.

    Philosopher. Chassidishe and Yeshivishe are mutually exclusive? Please define the terms how YOU understand them.

    #703838

    That’s quite a reasonable approach. I do use them occasionally, but usually follow with some further characterization, depending on circumstances.

    #703839

    says who
    Member

    different culture. speaking yiddish, mens levush, womens dress, age for shidduchim, bsho’s dates, differnt yeshiva’s, many times different derech halimud, women getting a degree the norm, I can go on and on. Of course not everything applies to everyone, but in general it sure gives you some picture of the way of life.

    #703840

    philosopher
    Member

    apushatayid, says who basically answered you. While the bottom line is that we are all fellow Yidden, there are things that categorizes us as individuals or groups. Sephardish and Ahskenaz, Chassidish and Yeshivish are examples that are NOT derogatory, they just describe the mehalach of an individual or group.

    Of course, within each group there are subgroups and then individual characteristics. But Chasidish, Litvish, Yekkish, Sephardi, Yemenite, these are that labels LOOSELY but not negatively describe an individual. While it is true that that not everyone is correctly termed with the right label, the labels still have a definition that cannot be applied for everyone.

    A man wearing a shtreimel on Shabbos, his first language is Yiddish, attended a Chassidishe Yeshiva, oops sorry no labels, okay learnt in Belz Yeshiva as a bochur, got married after seeing his chosen kallah after two beshows, learned two years in kollel and then went out to work can we call him Yeshivish?

    There’s nothing wrong in saying he’s Chassidish. Of course, Chassidish doesn’t mean that everybody who is classified as Chassidish has the exact same lifestyle as the example that I mentioned above, but a label sort of gives some sort of idea of a person.

    I’m Chassidish and proudly so. I see absolutely nothing wrong with being labeled a fellow Chassidishe Yid.

    #703841

    apushatayid
    Participant

    Says who. You didnt answer my question. Are being “yeshivishe” and “chassidishe” mutually exclusive? If yes, why. Why cant a yeshivishe person be considered chassidishe and vice versa?

    #703842

    says who
    Member

    If you don’t understand my answer then I didn’t understand your question. Please explain

    #703843

    apushatayid
    Participant

    Says Who. Lets rehash what you wrote.

    **different culture.**

    Please explain.

    **speaking yiddish,**

    They speak Yiddish in Monroe and Crown Heights. Ponovezh and Slonim. Are they all chassidish or yeshivish?

    “mens levush,”

    Please describe the levush that categorizes one as chassidishe and one as litvish. there is no overlap? and those who are labeled “MO” (what a deragatory term) dont wear either?

    “womens dress,”

    Last time I checked in on the thread about Tznius, everyone claimed the standard for womens dress was Kimchis. Was she chasiddish or yeshivish?

    “age for shidduchim,”

    Interesting.

    “bsho’s dates,”

    I dont understand your abbreviation.

    “differnt yeshiva’s,” and “many times different derech halimud,”

    Better tell that to BMG, Ponovezh, Mir, Torah Vodaas and many other wonderful yeshivos and those who learn in them.

    “women getting a degree the norm,”

    Whose norm?

    “I can go on and on.”

    Please do.

    “Of course not everything applies to everyone, but in general it sure gives you some picture of the way of life.”

    If someone qualifies as chassidish for three of the items listed above, 4 as yeshivish and one a none of the above, how would you classify that person if someone called you about a shidduch for him/her and asked you “is he/she yeshivish”?

    #703844

    says who
    Member

    It’s hard for me to beleive that you don’t understand my point.

    #703845

    sms007
    Member

    wow….were down to naming people after food….

    #703846

    smartcookie
    Member

    Philosopher- why did you choose Belz Yeshiva as an example? Just wondering…

    #703847

    says who
    Member

    We are all fellow jews with different labels. What’s wrong

    #703848

    fabie
    Member

    Is the term GreaseBall still used?

    #703849

    apushatayid
    Participant

    I understand that you cant or wont answer my question.

    All I’m saying is that these labels are meaningless as they mean something different to every person who uses it and every person who hears it.

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