milchig

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  • in reply to: homemade easy cranberry sauce recipe #622770

    milchig
    Member

    Just me- I’ll try yours.Sounds yummy.

    We always have left over Kedem wine from Yom Tov.

    in reply to: Respect for other posters comments #624396

    milchig
    Member

    Tzipi – I’m trying to figure that out as well and keep bringing up the original post. What they are debating is a seperate issue and should get a new thread.

    I have politely discussed a similar topic to Cantoresq’s above (supporting the many learners)

    Joseph,I believe it was with you.

    Joseph appears to be pro learning and learning only. It appears to me that he does not take into account those that work hard to generously support the learners.

    Maybe it’s just just me?

    My husband and I work hard to afford rent, food and family health insurance (and yes, my husband learns with a chevrusa). We live on a budget and are annoyed by those that take from the gov’t so the husband can learn and the wife can play mommy/housewife all day.

    While I don’t live in Israel my close family does. All my relatives have done the army and they too find time to learn. Ive heard my aunt say that it is hard to see your 18yr old as a chayal when the neighbors kid (same age but, with payos) hangs out in front of the yeshivah all day.

    Now maybe my situation is clarified for the readers.

    Joseph,

    In this day and age do you believe one can contribute to learning and working as well? We are lucky that we can listen to a shiur (IPOD, MP3, Internet, CD ,Tape) and read a safer at lunch or commuting to work. There is no reason for not earning a parnassah.

    I have come to this conclusion about respecting others views. I can not change other people I can only change myself.I do not namecall or tell others that their views don’t count but, I do appreciate that when discussing an issue with Joseph you get a backup to his thoughts and not just called an apikores without an explanation.

    in reply to: Respect for other posters comments #624374

    milchig
    Member

    We are all going off on tangents about different Rabbi’s.Please start a new post if you want to debate that because it is a different important issue and nothing to do with the original post.

    The original post was about respect for all commenters no matter what sect of Judaism you follow or what rabbi you follow.(That is between you and the One Above)

    Shalom ben adam lchaveiro was the point I was after.

    in reply to: Respect for other posters comments #624359

    milchig
    Member

    Joseph,

    Im not even going to respond.

    Have a happy and healthy!

    Peace be with you and all of you!

    in reply to: Respect for other posters comments #624355

    milchig
    Member

    It’s kind of ironic that I started this post because of a need for respect ben adam lchaveiro. The post then turned into a debate of Rabbi’s and halacha. I did not mention halacha in my post. I did mention the need for all Jews to respect eachother.

    Joseph,

    You inspired to to write this after being told I was telling “sheker” about a personal situation in williamsburgh. You do not know me so how dare you call me a liar. I’m sure you are not perfect and neither is anyone else.If we were all perfect moshiach would be here.

    For now we all (including myself) should work on the respect and traeatment ben adam lchaveyro.

    Wishing all a healthy and happy New Year.

    in reply to: Respect for other posters comments #624297

    milchig
    Member

    I thank everyone for their comments.

    Some of you agree that there needs to be a nicer way to say things while others are so quick so talk about halacha and calling people out and knocking them down.

    My posting had nothing to do with halacha which is mostly ben adam to the One Above and everything to so with midos ben adam lchaveiro.

    I value that rabbi’s statement and wish everyone a sweet healthy new year and shalom ben adam lchaveiro (no matter what observance level you follow)

    in reply to: Snoods VS. Sheitels #621650

    milchig
    Member

    This post was going so well untill the halacha debates and doubts.

    Sarah- I don’t live in Lakewood but, who is to say some woman did not offend this mans wife. Women can be quite mean at times to other women even if things are said by accident as a slip of the tongue and not meant to be offensive.

    I admire that you wear a snood and have not been accidentally insulted.

    Think about it..If you were insulted would your husband do a nice thing like this and find out what other women and men thought about the issue?

    in reply to: Inappropriate Workplace Behavior #620920

    milchig
    Member

    I have learned from many situations..

    Just because they dress the dress and walk the walk…doesn’t mean anything.

    A person’s charachter is often disguised on the outside and they are not pure on the inside.

    in reply to: Snoods VS. Sheitels #621625

    milchig
    Member

    Modern lakewood guy,

    I so agree with you and have learned since I was a child “girls can be mean” As an adult I have realized women are even more mean and obnoxious to other women.

    The shaitel issue and price has become out of hand the past few years. Many women in my neighborhhod will spend the $3000 on a human hair shaitel and then ask for tuition breaks or take gov’t funding for food and housing.

    A womans hair should be covered.

    It didn’t say with what or specify “what can or can not be worn Shabbat to cover your hair.

    I have been told may times in my life “I don’t look shabosdik b/c of….” One of the most ridiculous comments made to me was “what’s the matter you don’t own a Shabbos robe?” My answer back was I prefer to get dressed and not look like a hospital patient on Shabbat.

    I would tell your wife to just brush the comment off b/c the other woman is just vain or come back with a clever comeback.

    Your wife is following the rules 100%-probably even more b/c she is being a true modest woman.

    PS- I don’t own a shaitel.

    in reply to: DONT YOU HAVE ANYTHING ELSE TO TALK ABOUT? #627564

    milchig
    Member

    On the food topic following Yoshi’s comment.

    An email I got today I would like to share..

    Jewish Cooking for the Holidays

    Remember how your grandmother used to cook? Where is that cooking now?

    I’m talking about the lack of good old, down-home Jewish cooking in our homes. I’m taking it upon myself to help out all you frantic housewives out there with wonderful menus that will lead your children to a healthy, happy, and loving family unit as I knew it in my childhood.

    First, buy a housecoat (shmata) and wear it all day, every day. Then go out and buy a live chicken, carry it wrapped in a newspaper to the shoichet (slaughterer) who will ritually slaughter it before your very eyes. When you get it home, flick (pluck) your chicken and make sure you don’t leave in any pinchus (feather ends).

    Next, go out and buy a four-foot-long carp with huge whiskers. Fill your bathtub with water and let the fish swim in it for several days. In the meantime, roll up your Burbur broadloom, and remove it from the living room, polish the hardwood floors, cover them in newspaper, cover your couch in clear plastic, or floral slip covers, and don’t let anyone into your living room again ….unless they are “company.”

    Now you’re a real balabusta (or a berieh) which is a term of respect used for an efficient Jewish housewife, and the essence of your universe is in the kitchen. So get out your wooden matches, light the pilot light, get out the volgar holtz (wooden bowl), hock the tzibbeles (chop the onions) and knubble (garlic), and we’re Jewish again.

    Before we start, however, there are some variations in ingredients because of the various types of Jewish taste (Litvack and Gallicianer). Just as we Jews have six seasons of the year (winter, spring, summer, fall, slack, and busy), we all focus on a main ingredient which, unfortunately and undeservedly, has disappeared from our diet.

    I’m talking, of course, about SCHMALTZ (chicken fat)! Schmaltz has for centuries been the prime ingredient in almost every Jewish dish, and I feel it’s time to revive it to its rightful place in our homes. I have plans to distribute it in a green glass Gucci bottle with a label clearly stating: LOW FAT, NO CHOLESTEROL, NEWMAN’S CHOICE, EXTRA VIRGIN SCHMALTZ (it can’t miss)!

    Let’s start, of course, with the forshpeiz (appetizer). Gehockteh layber (chopped liver) with schmaltz and tzibbeles (onion) is always good, but how about something more exotic for your dear ones, like boiled whitefish in yoyech (gell). Or gefilteh miltz (stuffed spleen), in which the veins are removed, thank God, and it’s fried in — you guessed it — schmaltz, bread crumbs, eggs, onions, salt and pepper. Love it!

    How about stewed lingen (lungs) — very chewy. Or gehenen (brains) — very slimy.

    Am I making your mouth water yet? Then there are greebenes, which are pieces of chicken skin, deep-fried in schmaltz, onions and salt until crispy brown — often referred to as Jewish bacon (this makes a great appetizer for the next cardiology convention).

    Another favorite, and I’m sure your children will love it, is pe’tcha (jelliedcalves feet). Simply chop up some cows’ feet with your hockmesser (chopper), add some meat, onions, lots of garlic, schmaltz (yes, again), salt and pepper,cook for five hours, and let it sit overnight. You might want to serve it with oat bran and bananas for an interesting breakfast ( just joking).

    There’s also a nice chicken fricassee (stew) using the heart, gorgl (neck), pipick (the navel, a great delicacy, given to the favorite child, usually me), a fleegl (wing) or two, some ayelech (little premature eggs) and other various chicken innards, in a broth of schmaltz, water, paprika, etc.We also have knishes (filled dough) and the eternal question: “Will I have liver, beef, potatoes, or all three?”

    Other time-tested favorites are kishkeh, and its poor cousin, helzel (chicken or goose neck). Kishkeh is the gut of the cow, bought by the foot at the kosher butcher. It’s turned inside out, scalded and scraped. One end is sewn up and a mixture of flour, schmaltz (you didn’t think we’d leave that out), onions, eggs, salt, pepper, etc., is spooned into the open end and squished down until it is full. Then that end is sewn, and the whole thing is boiled. Yummy!

    My personal all-time favorite pastime is watching my Zaida (Grandpa) munch on boiled chicken feet. Try that on the kinderlach (children).

    Well, we’ve finally finished the forshpeiz. Don’t tell me you’re full because there’s plenty to come.

    For our next course, we always had chicken soup with pieces of yellow-white, rubbery chicken skin floating in a greasy sea of lokshen (noodles), farfel (broken bits of matzah), arbiss (chickpeas), lima beans, pietrishkeh, onions, mondlech (soup nuts), knaydlach (dumplings), kasha, (groats), kliskelech and marech (marrow bones).

    The main course, as I recall, was either boiled chicken, flanken, kackletten (hockfleish–chopped meat), and sometimes rib steaks which were served either well done, burned, or cremated. Occasionally, we had barbecued liver done to a burned and hardened perfection in our own coal furnace.

    Since we couldn’t have milk or any dairy products (milchiks) with our meat meals flayshiks), beverages consisted of cheap pop (Kik, Dominion Dry, seltzer in the spritz bottles), or a glezel tay (glass of hot tea) served in a yohrtzeit (memorial) glass, and sucked through a sugar cube held between the incisors.

    Desserts were probably the only things not made with schmaltz, so we never had any…..unless it was flummen (cooked prunes). Mama never learned how to make schmaltz Jell-O.

    Well, now you know the secret of how I’ve grown up to be so tall, sinewy, slim and trim, energetic, extremely clever and modest, and if you want your children to grow up to be like me, you’re in gontzen meshuggah (completely nuts)!

    Oh yes, don’t forget the loud greps (belch) — the louder the better –at the end of the meal as you unbutton or unzip your pants. It’s often the best part of the repast.

    Zei mir gezunt (be well)…and order out Chinese.

    in reply to: A Humorous Item #1171552

    milchig
    Member

    An email I just got and would like to pass on..

    Jewish Cooking for the Holidays

    Remember how your grandmother used to cook? Where is that cooking now?

    I’m talking about the lack of good old, down-home Jewish cooking in our homes. I’m taking it upon myself to help out all you frantic housewives out there with wonderful menus that will lead your children to a healthy, happy, and loving family unit as I knew it in my childhood.

    First, buy a housecoat (shmata) and wear it all day, every day. Then go out and buy a live chicken, carry it wrapped in a newspaper to the shoichet (slaughterer) who will ritually slaughter it before your very eyes. When you get it home, flick (pluck) your chicken and make sure you don’t leave in any pinchus (feather ends).

    Next, go out and buy a four-foot-long carp with huge whiskers. Fill your bathtub with water and let the fish swim in it for several days. In the meantime, roll up your Burbur broadloom, and remove it from the living room, polish the hardwood floors, cover them in newspaper, cover your couch in clear plastic, or floral slip covers, and don’t let anyone into your living room again ….unless they are “company.”

    Now you’re a real balabusta (or a berieh) which is a term of respect used for an efficient Jewish housewife, and the essence of your universe is in the kitchen. So get out your wooden matches, light the pilot light, get out the volgar holtz (wooden bowl), hock the tzibbeles (chop the onions) and knubble (garlic), and we’re Jewish again.

    Before we start, however, there are some variations in ingredients because of the various types of Jewish taste (Litvack and Gallicianer). Just as we Jews have six seasons of the year (winter, spring, summer, fall, slack, and busy), we all focus on a main ingredient which, unfortunately and undeservedly, has disappeared from our diet.

    I’m talking, of course, about SCHMALTZ (chicken fat)! Schmaltz has for centuries been the prime ingredient in almost every Jewish dish, and I feel it’s time to revive it to its rightful place in our homes. I have plans to distribute it in a green glass Gucci bottle with a label clearly stating: LOW FAT, NO CHOLESTEROL, NEWMAN’S CHOICE, EXTRA VIRGIN SCHMALTZ (it can’t miss)!

    Let’s start, of course, with the forshpeiz (appetizer). Gehockteh layber (chopped liver) with schmaltz and tzibbeles (onion) is always good, but how about something more exotic for your dear ones, like boiled whitefish in yoyech (gell). Or gefilteh miltz (stuffed spleen), in which the veins are removed, thank God, and it’s fried in — you guessed it — schmaltz, bread crumbs, eggs, onions, salt and pepper. Love it!

    How about stewed lingen (lungs) — very chewy. Or gehenen (brains) — very slimy.

    Am I making your mouth water yet? Then there are greebenes, which are pieces of chicken skin, deep-fried in schmaltz, onions and salt until crispy brown — often referred to as Jewish bacon (this makes a great appetizer for the next cardiology convention).

    Another favorite, and I’m sure your children will love it, is pe’tcha (jelliedcalves feet). Simply chop up some cows’ feet with your hockmesser (chopper), add some meat, onions, lots of garlic, schmaltz (yes, again), salt and pepper,cook for five hours, and let it sit overnight. You might want to serve it with oat bran and bananas for an interesting breakfast ( just joking).

    There’s also a nice chicken fricassee (stew) using the heart, gorgl (neck), pipick (the navel, a great delicacy, given to the favorite child, usually me), a fleegl (wing) or two, some ayelech (little premature eggs) and other various chicken innards, in a broth of schmaltz, water, paprika, etc.We also have knishes (filled dough) and the eternal question: “Will I have liver, beef, potatoes, or all three?”

    Other time-tested favorites are kishkeh, and its poor cousin, helzel (chicken or goose neck). Kishkeh is the gut of the cow, bought by the foot at the kosher butcher. It’s turned inside out, scalded and scraped. One end is sewn up and a mixture of flour, schmaltz (you didn’t think we’d leave that out), onions, eggs, salt, pepper, etc., is spooned into the open end and squished down until it is full. Then that end is sewn, and the whole thing is boiled. Yummy!

    My personal all-time favorite pastime is watching my Zaida (Grandpa) munch on boiled chicken feet. Try that on the kinderlach (children).

    Well, we’ve finally finished the forshpeiz. Don’t tell me you’re full because there’s plenty to come.

    For our next course, we always had chicken soup with pieces of yellow-white, rubbery chicken skin floating in a greasy sea of lokshen (noodles), farfel (broken bits of matzah), arbiss (chickpeas), lima beans, pietrishkeh, onions, mondlech (soup nuts), knaydlach (dumplings), kasha, (groats), kliskelech and marech (marrow bones).

    The main course, as I recall, was either boiled chicken, flanken, kackletten (hockfleish–chopped meat), and sometimes rib steaks which were served either well done, burned, or cremated. Occasionally, we had barbecued liver done to a burned and hardened perfection in our own coal furnace.

    Since we couldn’t have milk or any dairy products (milchiks) with our meat meals flayshiks), beverages consisted of cheap pop (Kik, Dominion Dry, seltzer in the spritz bottles), or a glezel tay (glass of hot tea) served in a yohrtzeit (memorial) glass, and sucked through a sugar cube held between the incisors.

    Desserts were probably the only things not made with schmaltz, so we never had any…..unless it was flummen (cooked prunes). Mama never learned how to make schmaltz Jell-O.

    Well, now you know the secret of how I’ve grown up to be so tall, sinewy, slim and trim, energetic, extremely clever and modest, and if you want your children to grow up to be like me, you’re in gontzen meshuggah (completely nuts)!

    Oh yes, don’t forget the loud greps (belch) — the louder the better –at the end of the meal as you unbutton or unzip your pants. It’s often the best part of the repast.

    Zei mir gezunt (be well)…and order out Chinese.

    in reply to: Is there a Drug Problem in the “Frum World”? #1100284

    milchig
    Member

    Why is this lashon hara?

    Shh someone may hear the frum are not perfect..

    All for what?

    Is saving a life worth more to people that lashon hara??

    Admit the problem so we can seek help for it as a community!!

    in reply to: Lycra long sleeve shirts #645794

    milchig
    Member

    Thank you all for your responses! After going upstate this past weekend (going to shul, talking to the women I met and driving around with my husband motzei Shabbat) I have realized that this may be the new style and even at my (not so old age) I am not up with the latest trends. I guess at long as you are covered it is accepted.

    My opinion after reading the above posts is that depending on how tight these shirts are worn they can either make or break the look.

    in reply to: Kids At A Kiddush Crisis #620149

    milchig
    Member

    Jo Jo,

    I fully agree with you.

    I have seen frum men and women save seats for toddlers and children while adults/elderly were left to stand at a simcha.

    This problem does exist in our communities and is a simple one to solve by teaching old fashioned midot.

    My friends at shul have addressed this matter and have come up with the following when we have a kiddush/bris at shul.

    We decided to have a toddlers and kids table with paper table cloth, crayons and kid food. This way all the toddlers and kids get seats, food and company and the adults/elderly get the same kavod they deserve.

    in reply to: Lycra long sleeve shirts #645776

    milchig
    Member

    Thank You for your answers! Many of you have answered my question whether you agree or disagree. I appreciate that.

    Momof4- I am referring to any shirt that is way too tight whether it is cotton, Lycra or any other fabric being worn under a dress that is way too tight in the first place.

    The next simcha you go to look at how many people are dressed the way I described.

    The problem is that they are not appropriately sized or styled.

    in reply to: Should pro-freikeit commentors be given a voice? #626040

    milchig
    Member

    Why should they not be given a voice? The website is called Yeshiva World News..It does not specify what yeshevah you grew up going to or send your kids to.

    in reply to: Out Of The Mailbag: (Cautionary Story About Hotels) #650072

    milchig
    Member

    zspira,

    I agree with you in many ways. There is a professional way to handle things without trashing reputations and you have the right idea.

    in reply to: Out Of The Mailbag: (Cautionary Story About Hotels) #650065

    milchig
    Member

    I understand the point..research where you vacation if you are this machmir or pedantic as to where you spend shabbat,shabbos.

    It is a bit sad to me that even the “frum” heimish men did not volunteer to lein. That is what you are sent to yeshivah for. Someone could have at least given a speech about the parasha. Afterall most of you learn or should catch a shiur online.

    Nowdays frum people vacation anywhere and even make shabbat in a hotel room.

    To complain about a meal without bassar -oy we should all only have these issues. Not everyone cares about that. At long as it is kosher and you have candles to light, wine(gafen) and challah you have a meal. Not every restaurant has bentchers on the table you have to ask for them sometimes. Not every hotel sings zimirot. That is a personal preference. Not everyone observes shabbat in the same way. Some people may want a day of menucha in a place with kosher food.

    Advertising in a frum or jewish paper says nothing. In Florida there are many treif places that advertise in Jewish papers that are displayed at the local shuls.

    People have to be SPECIFIC in what they are asking. Not everyone knows what “mixed crowd” means according to “frum speak”. Not everyone working at a hotel upstate is Jewish or even college educated. The author of this letter should understand this before he/she trashes a hotels reputation. There aren’t many kosher ones left up there anymore.

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