Mommish

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  • in reply to: Out Of The Mailbag: (A Parent’s Involvement In A Child’s Shidduch) #636555

    Mommish
    Member

    Assuming that she’s already gone out with several Litvishe boys and knows what she wants, perhaps she could get her parents’ Rav to speak to the parents. They may be able to hear this more easily from someone they look up to than from their daughter.

    in reply to: The CR Laboratory: Try Your HTML Formatting Experiments Here #630461

    Mommish
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    in reply to: Please Share Recommendations For Children’s Fiction #670099

    Mommish
    Member

    JEWISH

    M.C. Millman has has written several good Jewish children’s and young adult books, including Too Tough to Care and Mastermind. Mrs. Millman wrote some of the books in the excellent Cheery Bim Band series, which is one of the few Jewish series geared to boys. Realistic fiction.

    The Savta Simcha series is a good read-aloud for 1st or 2nd grade, and conveys a love for Yiddishkeit and Eretz Yisroel. Fantasy.

    The Adventures of K’tonton;: A little Jewish Tom Thumb

    by Sadie Rose Weilerstein — if you can find it — written in the 30’s or 40’s. An excellent read-aloud for ages 4 – 7 or a read-alone for older childen. There are used copies on Amazon. Fantasy.

    Chaimkel the Dreamer by Meir Uri Gottesman. Ages 8-12. Like Rabbi Gottesman’s books for adults, this is realistic fiction with fantasy elements.

    That’s Me, Tzviki Green by Chaim Walder. Realistic fiction, set in the 80’s in Israel and America. Upper elementary grades.

    SECULAR

    The Wizard of Oz series by L. Frank Baum — all 14 books are still in print about 100 years after they were written. Although many of the main characters are girls, my sons loved this series. Chapter books, good read-alouds for younger children, reading level about 4th grade. Fantasy.

    Caddie Woodlawn, and Magical Melons, by Carol Ryrie Brink. What Little House on the Prairie might have been if Laura Ingalls had been a real tomboy. Realistic fiction.

    The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien. Upper elemenatry grades. Fantasy. Also Tolkien’s more difficult epic fantasy series, Lord of the Rings, but perhaps a bit difficult for elementary age.

    James and the Giant Peach, and The BFG, by Roald Dahl. Fantasies.

    in reply to: Warning: Swallowed Batteries #655105

    Mommish
    Member

    May Hazel have a complete recovery!

    in reply to: Suggestions to Improve YWN #1224832

    Mommish
    Member

    On the topics screen, in addition to the topic name and most recent post/poster, I’d like the listings to show when the first post in a thread was made, and by whom.

    in reply to: Whats For Supper Tonight? #627691

    Mommish
    Member

    Lentil soup with garlic bread.

    in reply to: Chol Homoed Destinations Sukkos 5769 #622866

    Mommish
    Member

    We enjoy hiking. There is an interesting variant of hiking — like hiking combined with a a treasure hunt — called letterboxing. We haven’t tried it (yet), but it sounds like a fun and inexpensive activity for the whole family. There was an article about letterboxing last year in WhereWhatWhen, a frum magazine in Baltimore. Here’s the link:

    http://www.wherewhatwhen.com/read_articles.asp?id=463

    in reply to: Leaving children alone in the house #990815

    Mommish
    Member

    She could invest in a treadmill, or walk when her son is in school or when her husband (or another adult) is home. Child Protective Services could remove your nephew from the home for what they see as negligence.

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