oyveygevalt

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  • in reply to: If you do not have s'micha, can you advertise yourself as "Rabbi"? #1134275

    oyveygevalt
    Participant

    It is illegal in several states (I believe New York, as well) to impersonate a clergyman. A while back, some non jewish criminal was actually arrested in New York for faking being a Rabbi. Try telling the DA that you never went to school to get a degree but you felt it was appropriate to call yourself a Rabbi. Dena d’malchusa dena.

    I believe studying Torah changes a person. Serious study and focus on Torah topics (yes, even hilchos melicha), particularly with a talmid chochom, changes a person. That person who spent hours on hilchos melicha will be a better rebby with a better hashkafa than others.

    Further, if Dirshu has taught the velt anything it is that studying for a test adds focus and competence. A fellow who is learning loosely will simply retain less and be impacted less than someone studying for a semicha exam.

    in reply to: If you do not have s'micha, can you advertise yourself as "Rabbi"? #1134242

    oyveygevalt
    Participant

    I personally feel that there is a big difference between someone calling themselves “Rabbi” and others calling him a “Rabbi”. It is certainly generous and respectful to call a Rebby in yeshiva or anyone revered for good middos with the title “Rabbi” even if he has not earned semicha. However, for that person to call himself a “Rabbi” is simply a sheker and gnaivas daas.

    By the way, after shelling out tens of thousands of dollars in tuition I find it troubling that Yeshivos don’t hire people who spent the time, effort and commitment for semicha to teach our children.

    in reply to: YU Bochrim #1139218

    oyveygevalt
    Participant

    Just a note about YU. There are different programs within the Yeshiva (several choices for weaker backgrounds). Therefore, you might want to ask whose shiur he is in.

    Personally, I graduated 35 years ago. Many of my classmates are currently roshei yeshiva, rabbanim and leaders of their communities (such as board members of yeshivos and shuls). Recently, my son got semicha at YU. Unlike many yeshivos with one or two year programs, the semicha at YU is four years and covers multiple topics not covered elsewhere.

    Over the years, the YU program has become even frummer. Many of the mixed events such as the chanuka chagiga are now separate for men and women at completely different locations. Frankly, the bochurim coming back from E”Y are just frummer and will not attend a modern school.

    Bottom line is that you may be happily surprised that the prized “learner-earner” is a good YU bochur.

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