Sholom D

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  • in reply to: Otzar HaCochma vs. HebrewBooks vs. Bar-Ilan #1988798
    Sholom D
    Participant

    UJM: I have Bar Ilan and am very happy with it. I appreciate having the Encyclopedia Talmudit, the scope and accuracy of their texts, having the texts in text format, and the fantastic search engine.

    I would love to also have Otzar haChochma, either the Bnei Torah or the regular edition. If you’d like to purchase either one for me, I’d be thrilled.

    However, you were the one in the marketplace and were asking what the differences were and I told you. The Bnei Torah edition removes 1,500 seforim that appear in the regular edition and the criterion for exclusion is hashkafic.

    As I said, I’d be happy with either one.

    in reply to: Otzar HaCochma vs. HebrewBooks vs. Bar-Ilan #1988671
    Sholom D
    Participant

    UJM: Yes, Otzar haChochma has many more seforim, but their “Bnei Torah” edition specifically excludes works from certain authors, generally those that are Religious Zionist or academic. That’s what differentiates it and that’s why it’s called the “Bnei Torah” edition — it censors out works that do not match yeshivishe expectations.

    As I wrote above,
    ‘As mentioned above, very different products.
    Aside from what’s already mentioned, Bar Ilan’s library includes Encyclopedia Talmudit, tries to use the most accurate version of all its texts, and includes important texts by Rabbonim and poskim from the Dati Leumi world, including journal articles, teshuvos, etc.
    Those texts do not appear in the “Bnei Torah” version of Otzar, which deletes works from outside the charedi world.
    If you would like to learn about Shevi’is, for instance, and don’t want to be exposed to the works that Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach considered the most essential ever written on that topic, quoting them on nearly every page of his own work (Rav Kook’s seforim on Shevi’is), then Otzar haChochma Bnei Torah Edition is for you.
    If you would like to see what Rav Shlomo Zalman learned and what he thought was essential, then you’ll need Bar Ilan.”

    in reply to: Otzar HaCochma vs. HebrewBooks vs. Bar-Ilan #1988487
    Sholom D
    Participant

    UJM: If you think there might be hashkafic issues with religious texts that are data-entered by a university or the wider selection that appears on Sefaria, then you should get Otzar haCHochma Bnei Torah edition.

    Its specifically tailored towards those who want their seforim censored.

    And you should also stay off the internet and not read any blogs.

    in reply to: Otzar HaCochma vs. HebrewBooks vs. Bar-Ilan #1988214
    Sholom D
    Participant

    As mentioned above, very different products.
    Aside from what’s already mentioned, Bar Ilan’s library includes Encyclopedia Talmudit, tries to use the most accurate version of all its texts, and includes important texts by Rabbonim and poskim from the Dati Leumi world, including journal articles, teshuvos, etc.
    Those texts do not appear in the “Bnei Torah” version of Otzar, which deletes works from outside the charedi world.
    If you would like to learn about Shevi’is, for instance, and don’t want to be exposed to the works that Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach considered the most essential ever written on that topic, quoting them on nearly every page of his own work (Rav Kook’s seforim on Shevi’is), then Otzar haChochma Bnei Torah Edition is for you.
    If you would like to see what Rav Shlomo Zalman thought was essential, then you’ll need Bar Ilan.

    in reply to: Bug Checking #1553674
    Sholom D
    Participant

    K-cup : You will want to read Rav Eitam Henkin z”l’s sefer, לכם יהיה לאכלה, which you can purchase from the publisher, who will mail it to you.
    Rav Melamed referred to it in his essay and you will find there a systematic treatment of these issues, with the emphasis on analyzing the sources.

    It has multiple haskomos, including from Rav Mazuz.

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