NYC Anti-Kapparos “Activists” Claim COVID-19 Is “Proof” That It Must Be Banned

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Shlugging kapparos in the streets of Meah Shearim (Yehuda Boltshauser & Co. / Kuvien Images)

Anti-Kapporos crusaders are relaunching a legal attack against the Minhag which involves Shechita — arguing the novel coronavirus pandemic presents new evidence it’s harmful to human health.

“This is a real danger now that needs to be recognized,” attorney Nora Marino said. “It’s not about what could happen, it’s about what has happened.”

Marino, who represents the Alliance to End Chickens as Kaporos (the name has multiple accepted spellings) filed this month a motion to renew her case — struck down in 2018 by the New York Court of Appeals — and compel the NYPD to enforce Health Department codes she says are routinely broken during the pre-Yom Kippur atonement ritual.

In her motion, Marino argues the COVID-19 pandemic represents new evidence of the dangers of public animal slaughter, drawing comparisons to the wet markets of Wuhan where some scientists believe the pandemic started its spread, although the origin is still under investigation.

“It’s not about what could happen,” Marino said. “It’s about what has happened because of a live animal wet market.”

It remains unclear whether a Manhattan supreme court judge will sign off on Marino’s motion, or when, considering the upheaval caused by the COVID-19 shutdown.

READ MORE: NY1




9 COMMENTS

  1. when everyone stops eating animals in america, then we will talk, what do kaparos have to do with anything, stupid goyim. missing half their brains, maybe they should have ate their chicken when their paretns made them , instead of giving it to the dog

  2. Let’s just hope no permits ordinarily granted to build a סוכה get turned down this year. This being an absolute תורה obligation is way more important than a מנהג

  3. We know there are kooks in Brooklyn.

    It would be so much more useful to have someone credible address the steps seasonal “backyard” כפורות operations are taking toward כשרות, cleanliness, and safety.

  4. Res judicata. Nothing has changed with regard to the legal principle on which the case was dismissed in the first place. On the contrary, the principle that the city has unlimited discretion in how it chooses to enforce its laws has been strengthened this summer, with the blatant refusal to enforce the laws against BLM demonstrators and vandals. If a court cannot order the NYPD to shut down every BLM gathering and arrest every vandal, then it certainly can’t order it to shut down kaporos.

  5. Milhouse:

    Your point is accurate. It would be inconsistent. But you have not accounted for our mayor. He is an evil **** who has managed to do almost every possible thing to restrict the practice of Yiddishkeit. He has proven to be one of our worst enemies, and we should all be davening three times a day for his downfall. I do hope that some of the askanim that support this rosho are monitoring this thread. They need to withdraw their support, or stop representing our community that has been victimized by him.

  6. “milhouse” that what you think, but when we had our protests, the nypd gave us all tickets during corona, as opposed to the shvartsa they dont sit around, they actually fight back. im not saying we should be like them, im just saying that we yidden are taken advantage of because we are not beheimos

  7. We should shlag kaparos with all animal rights activists, politically correct meshugoim, and left wing libs…. And trample them, before they trample us.

  8. TLIN and HB, you don’t seem to understand the issue here. The city could have shut down kaporos years ago. There’s little question that some laws are being broken, at least technically and in some cases more than technically. Kaporos exists in NYC because the city chooses not to enforce the laws too strictly against it, out of consideration for our religious needs, and in recognition of the fact that it’s only one week a year.

    The activists sued, asking the court to order the city to enforce the law, and the case was dismissed because courts simply have no authority to do that. It is up to the city whether and when to enforce the law, and if it chooses not to that’s none of any court’s business.

    This year’s experience has made that argument stronger. If a court could order the city to stop kaporos, then it could also order the city to stop BLM.