The Riddle Thread….

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  • #1069838
    OneOfMany
    Participant

    writersoul: Ha, I just got it. Very clever.

    #1069839
    SaysMe
    Member

    13) catfish

    #1069840

    Hair, Thair, Everywhair – Answers

    The Amish (writersoul)

    3) All bearded U.S. presidents had this trait in common.

    They were all Republicans [Hmmmm, should Romney stop shaving?]

    4) How Caesar (supposedly) hid his baldness.

    Laurel wreath (writersoul).

    5) A near miss with disaster is sometimes called this.

    A close shave (writersoul)

    6) An audacious, dangerous and risky act is sometimes metaphorically referred to as this.

    “Bearding the lion in his own den”.

    7) A famous Sherlock Holmes short story references this fictional group.

    8) This garment is worn by religious fanatics to make them physically uncomfortable.

    A hair shirt. (writersoul)

    Supposedly, an eagle mistook his bald head for a rock and dropped a turtle on it in order to crack its shell. (writersoul)

    10) This is what camel-hair brushes are really made of (usually).

    11) Edward Teach was better known and feared by this nickname.

    Blackbeard, the pirate. (writersoul)

    12) Recommended cure for a hangover.

    The Catfish. (SaysMe)

    The rhinoceros. (OneOfMany)

    15) By law, food service workers must wear these.

    A hairnet. (writersoul)

    16) This soldier’s safety device may not fit bearded men properly.

    A gas mask. (writersoul)

    Her suit. [Say it out loud if you don’t get it. Sorry, I just had to add that groaner.]

    #1069841
    TheGoq
    Participant

    Welcome back ICOT!!!!!

    #1069842

    The Goq-

    Thank you.

    #1069843
    oomis
    Participant

    4) How Caesar (supposedly) hid his baldness. WREATH AROUND HIS FOREHEAD

    5) A near miss with disaster is sometimes called this. CLOSE SHAVE

    6) An audacious, dangerous and risky act is sometimes metaphorically referred to as this. HAIR-BRAINED

    8) This garment is worn by religious fanatics to make them physically uncomfortable. HAIR SHIRT

    11) Edward Teach was better known and feared by this nickname.

    12) Recommended cure for a hangover. HAIR OF THE DOG

    15) By law, food service workers must wear these. HAIRNET

    16) This soldier’s safety device may not fit bearded men properly. GAS MASK

    #1069844

    oomis1105-

    Congrats, you got most of them.

    I actually gave the answers higher up on the page.

    Your answer to #6 is better than mine (and I like the pun, too).

    #1069845
    writersoul
    Member

    Nope, that’s actually from “The Three Garridebs” which is also an awesome story, but from somewhat later in Conan Doyle’s career.

    Can you tell that I really like Sherlock Holmes?

    Sorry about being “nitpicky”— I seem to annoy a lot of people that way.

    #1069846
    OneOfMany
    Participant

    17 = *groooooooooan* 😛

    #1069847

    writersoul-

    You’re absolutely right – I confused the two “victims” in different short stories.

    I, too, read and enjoyed Sherlock Holmes, but I finished them all quite a while ago and I see my memory is far from perfect.

    By pointing out that I got a fact wrong you are doing me a favor – now I will (hopefully) stop making that mistake.

    Thank you for the correction.

    OneOfMany-

    Thank you ?

    #1069848

    1) Future First Lady Martha Dandridge married this man on May 15, 1750.

    2) If someone awoke in Brooklyn, NY at 7:00 AM on September 14, 1752 after a ten-hour nap, when did they fall sleep?

    3) What is the reason the Staten Island bridge that is outermoust from the other four boros of New York City got its name?

    4) These two brothers achieved the first manned flight.

    5) What is the predominant metal in a U.S. nickel?

    6) Current U.S. coinage includes the penny (one cent), nickel (five cents), dime (ten cents), quarter (twenty-five-cents) half-dollar (fifty cents) and dollar. Has there ever been a three cent piece? If so, when was the last U.S. coin with a three on it minted?

    7) Where did French’s mustard originate?

    8) What is the U.S. capital?

    9) Which one-word salutation did Alexander Graham Bell reccomend for use when answering a phone?

    10) Information gathered from all points of the compass is called “News” because it has this characteristic.

    11) The two things that stick out of the sides of your head are known as this (your glasses hook over them).

    12) Scotch Tape’s country of origin.

    13) Who is in the first photo of a human being on the moon?

    #1069849
    shmoel
    Member

    2) That night midnight England and its terrotories converted from the Julian to the Greogiran calendar, skipping 10 days.

    3) Outerbridge is named after some General (or something.)

    4) Wright brothers.

    8) Washington, DC. (Unless that is a trick question. It’s way too simple.)

    11) Ears. (Same point as 8.)

    13) Neil Armstrong.

    #1069850

    1) Future First Lady Martha Dandridge married this man on May 15, 1750.

    2) If someone awoke in Brooklyn, NY at 7:00 AM on September 14, 1752 after a ten-hour nap, when did they fall sleep?

    Obvious (and incorrect) answer: September 13, 1752 at 9:00 PM. Correct answer: September 2, 1752 at 9:00 PM. Sept. 3, 1752 thru Sept. 13, 1752 were skipped in British territory. [credit: shmoel]

    3) What is the reason the Staten Island bridge that is outermost from the other four boros of New York City got its name?

    [credit: shmoel]

    4) These two brothers achieved the first manned flight.

    5) What is the predominant metal in a U.S. nickel?

    Obvious (and incorrect) answer: Nickel. Correct answer: Copper. The nickel is about 75% copper, 25% nickel.

    6) Current U.S. coinage includes the penny (one cent), nickel (five cents), dime (ten cents), quarter (twenty-five-cents) half-dollar (fifty cents) and dollar. Has there ever been a three cent piece? If so, when was the last U.S. coin with a three on it minted?

    7) Where did French’s mustard originate?

    Obvious (and incorrect) answer: France. Correct answer: In the U.S. It was created by Robert Timothy French.

    8) What is the U.S. capital?

    [credit: shmoel]

    9) Which one-word salutation did Alexander Graham Bell reccomend for use when answering a phone?

    Obvious (and incorrect) answer: Hello. Correct answer: Ahoy! (really!)

    10) Information gathered from all points of the compass is called “News” because it has this characteristic.

    Obvious (and incorrect) answer: Because it comes from all directions – North, East, West and South. Correct answer: Because the info it contains is new.

    11) The two things that stick out of the sides of your head are known as this (your glasses hook over them).

    [partial credit: shmoel]

    12) Scotch Tape’s country of origin.

    13) Who is in the first photo of a human being on the moon?

    #1069851
    Wisey
    Participant

    These qs are trivia not riddles

    #1069852

    demanding crowd here! ok, here’s one from a puzzle magazine:

    Not for Nitwits

    Can you add one h to the word “bead” to make a common word?

    #1069853
    squeak
    Participant

    one h + bead = bone head.

    Et tu, ICOT?

    #1069854
    Chulent
    Member

    Then fall, squeak?

    #1069855
    Torah613Torah
    Participant

    Is it terrible that every time I see this thread, I think of Tom Riddle?

    #1069856

    squeak

    Hi.

    Not sure what the context of the question is, so here are your options for an answer – pick any one you like:

    ?

    ? It is certain

    ? It is decidedly so

    ? Without a doubt

    ? You may rely on it

    ? As I see it, yes

    ? Most likely

    ? Outlook good

    ? Yes

    ? Signs point to yes

    ? Reply hazy, try again

    ? Ask again later

    ? Better not tell you now

    ? Cannot predict now

    ? Concentrate and ask again

    ? Don’t count on it

    ? My reply is no

    ? My sources say no

    ? Outlook not so good

    ? Very doubtful

    ===============================

    Utter Chaos

    (by the great Will Shortz)

    Can you go from “Utter” to “Chaos” in eleven steps, using the following rules?

    1) Each step allows one letter to be changed.

    2) The order of letters can’t be changed.

    3) A valid five-letter word must created in each step.

    4) If adding additional letters to a shorter word creates a valid form of the word, e.g. take ==> takes, that’s also OK.

    (as an added incentive, be aware that I didn’t solve this one. you now have the opportunity to demonstrate that at least one person here has a bonier head that you do. ?)

    #1069857
    squeak
    Participant

    Rules 3 and 4 seem to conflict

    #1069858
    uneeq
    Member

    I thought so too. Then I realized that it means to say that if your five letter word is really a four letter word plus an S or an R as in the words rider or rides which would both be valid words.

    #1069859
    uneeq
    Member

    I thought so too. Then I realized that it means to say that if your five letter word is really a four letter word plus an S or an R as in the words rider or rides which would both be valid words.

    #1069860

    Hint: More than one word in the solution list is of the 4 + 1 (e.g. takes, taker, taken, etc) variety. (don’t try to darshen what “more than one” means – it’s deliberately vague and can be any number between two and all eleven.)

    #1069861

    Correction:

    There are eleven steps needed to get from “Utter” to “Chaos”. There are ten words between “Utter” and “Chaos”.

    Hint #2: there are three consecutive words that have “u” in the second position, followed by five consecutive words with the same vowel that isn’t “u” in the second position.

    #1069862
    SaysMe
    Member

    now i think i got it! the hint helped

    Here’s at least one solution

    utter

    otter

    outer

    cuter

    curer

    corer

    cores

    corps

    coops

    chops

    chaps

    chaos

    though i see this isnt your solution

    #1069863
    frummy in the tummy
    Participant

    Two ropes hang from a ceiling that is 100 feet high down to the ground.

    Your mission: Attain as much length of rope as you possibly can.

    Your tools: A pair of clippers.

    Rules: Rope is only “attained” if you cut it from the hanging rope and bring it safely with you back to the ground. If you fall from more than a 20-ft height, you will die. ‘Length of rope’ is only counted if it is at its original thickness; the rope will also only support you (plus the clippers) at its original thickness.

    What is the greatest length of rope you can possibly attain?

    Hint: If done correctly, you can successfully attain more than 150 feet of rope.

    #1069864
    frummy in the tummy
    Participant

    The two ropes hang two feet away from each other.

    #1069865

    SaysMe

    Excellent!

    That wasn’t the solution I saw, but it’s correct.

    Enjoy the non-bonehead award that you’ve so clearly earned.

    frummy in the tummy

    Shimmy to the top of a rope.

    Cut the other rope at its very top.

    Create a loop of rope at the top of the rope you’re on (probably using a foot or two of rope).

    Hold on to the loop, and cut the looped rope below the loop.

    Tie the two cut ropes together.

    Run the tied rope thru the loop, letting each end hang equally below the loop.

    Climb down the tied rope, being careful to keep hold of both sides.

    Once you reach the bottom, release one side, and pull the entire thing thru the loop, leaving you with @ 198′ – 199′ of rope.

    #1069866
    frummy in the tummy
    Participant

    ICOT – Very well done!

    #1069867

    frummy in the tummy-

    Thank you.

    Was that an original? I enjoy logic puzzles, and don’t recall seeing anything like that one.

    #1069868
    frummy in the tummy
    Participant

    I saw it in a mensa riddle book years back and liked it as well.

    #1069869
    SaysMe
    Member

    thankyew thankyew vera much! i love those word morph games, but that one had me stumped for a while!

    #1069870

    The MENSA Wannabe

    I walked into the local Mensa

    Sat down on their new credenza

    Said I wanted to apply

    Instead, I got the evil eye

    My ego dragging on the floor

    I turned and headed for the door

    Saw a Mensa member (with his great brain,)

    Trying to exit, push and strain

    Now I have a little hope

    For although with brains, his head was full

    #1069871
    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    You are trying to cross a river, and you only have 1 boat. The boat can carry you and one other thing.

    You need to bring:

    1 wolf

    1 sheep

    1 giraffe

    1 bale of cotton

    1 bushel of apples

    1 bushel of leaves

    The wolf cannot be left together with either of the other animals, or it will eat them.

    The sheep cannot be left together with the cotton, or it will eat it.

    The giraffe cannot be left together with the leaves, or it will eat them.

    How do you get across, in 11 or fewer crossings?

    #1069872

    popa_bar_abba-

    You’re gonna need a bigger boat.

    Just a warning, sir.

    (I may have seen this solution elsewhere.)

    #1069873
    frummy in the tummy
    Participant

    ICOT – that’s awesome! But wasn’t he correctly trying to push if it says P-U-S-H? You could just change it to “Trying to exit, pull and strain” without having to change any of your rhyme words.

    popa – I agree with ICOT; no matter what he brings the first time, one of the wolf, sheep, or giraffe will remain with something they can’t, right?

    #1069874

    frummy in the tummy-

    Thank you.

    Yes, it’s ironic that, just like my mythical Mensa member, I confused “push” and “pull”. Oh, well. 😛

    You can Google “Midvale school for the gifted” to see the inspiration for “The MENSA Wannabe”.

    #1069875
    frummy in the tummy
    Participant

    ICOT – Haha, yeah, no harm. I still know you’re smart (just like the mensa dude).

    #1069876
    Wisey
    Participant

    PBA-

    Shear the sheep and spin the wool into string.

    Tie up the wolf.

    Burn the leaves (you can get more leaves at the other side)

    Use the cotton to make a sail for the boat

    Tie the giraffe to the boat

    Throw the apples across the river

    Place the sheep and the wolf on the boat

    Sit on the giraffe and send it and the boat across (it wont drown because it is very tall)

    Lol.

    #1069877
    ukguyinEY
    Participant

    Hi everyone I have read through most of this thread, I have just joined as a member

    I don’t think this one has been asked yet

    A policeman is trying to solve a murder mystery and asks for witnesses.

    1 neighbour comes forward and says “it was a cold wintery morning and I came out my house and I heard a commotion coming from next door so I walked up to the window and I wiped off the fog from it and looked inside and saw the dead man on the floor in a pool of blood”.

    The policeman takes out a pair of handcuffs and says you are under arrest.

    WHY did the police arrest him?

    #1069878
    ukguyinEY
    Participant

    Moshe walks into a room and sees a dead body hanging on a rope and a puddle of water in the middle of the room, besides for thst there was NOTHING else inside the room and the rope was too high for someone to hang himself and nobody helped him

    How did he hang himself?

    #1069879
    frummy in the tummy
    Participant

    ukguy – First one: did he arrest him for trespassing?

    Second one: Block of ice. (or staircase of ice if it’s really high)

    #1069880
    frummy in the tummy
    Participant

    In what way can somebody both be together and be anything?

    #1069881
    ukguyinEY
    Participant

    The first one:no he was arrested for the murder

    Second one:Excellent Frummy he was on a block of ice

    #1069882
    frummy in the tummy
    Participant

    Is it just that because it is winter, it would be unlikely that condensation form on the outside of the windows?

    #1069883
    SaysMe
    Member

    ukguy- because you wipe off fog from the inside on a cold day

    #1069884
    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    Is it just that because it is winter, it would be unlikely that condensation form on the outside of the windows?

    That’s what I thought, but it can’t be the answer. Because then the policeman would just not believe him. But he arrested him. It isn’t a crime to lie to a cop about a crime you know nothing about (I think. But if its a fed, it is different, I think.)

    #1069885
    ukguyinEY
    Participant

    Says me and Frummy its the right answer

    Popa-if he knew nothing about the murder he would have just said that

    A bit like “Migu”

    #1069886
    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    No, he might just like attention. Or, he might know something that incriminates someone else, and he is trying to draw attention away from that.

    #1069887
    popa_bar_abba
    Participant

    In any event, the real answer is that the fingerprints on the outside of the window matched the fingerprints on the gun, and since he says he wiped the window, they are probably his fingerprints so he is probably the murderer. So he arrested him and took him in for fingerprint testing.

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