Irene: Worst Effects On Northeast In 50 Years Possible

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There is potential for the worst hurricane impacts in 50 years along the northern part of the Atlantic Seaboard as Irene plows northward.

The impacts on lives, property, commerce and travel will be serious.

While Irene is not forecast to track as far west, nor as fast, as Hazel did in 1954, it will ride up along the mid-Atlantic coast in such a way as to inflict major damage in many coastal and some inland communities. In today’s dollars, Hazel was a multi-billion-dollar storm and reached Category 4 at peak intensity.

Irene will track farther east than Hazel, and farther west than Bob (1991). Meteorologist Heather Buchman compares Irene to storms in the past.

While Irene is expected to weaken Saturday into Sunday after encountering cooler waters in northern latitudes, that will not happen fast enough to prevent serious problems from wind, rain and ocean water.

If you live near the projected path of Irene, you are at risk for power outages, flooding problems and property damage with this storm.

While Irene is expected to weaken Saturday into Sunday after encountering cooler waters in northern latitudes, that will not happen fast enough to prevent serious problems from wind, rain and ocean water.

If you live near the projected path of Irene, you are at risk for power outages, flooding problems and property damage with this storm.

Many people along the Atlantic Seaboard probably have not experienced such a strong storm as we expect with Hurricane Irene. People in the path of Irene should stay indoors during the height of this storm.

Some of the youngest of the crowd were not around for Floyd (1999), Fran (1996), Gloria (1985) and others. Then there are the storms of the more distant generations of the 1960s and 1950s, which include Donna (1960), Diane (1955) and Hazel (1954).

In addition to the potential for a great number of downed trees and power lines, Irene can cause other property issues ranging from damaged roofs and siding to busted windows. These items, and others knocked loose, will become airborne projectiles.

High winds will affect air travel and high-profile vehicles in the path of Irene.

There are many bridges that reach sky-high in the major port cities. The higher up you are, the stronger the winds will be. Travel over these bridges for a time at the height of Irene could be halted.

(Source: AccuWeather.com)

2 COMMENTS

  1. I remember Hurricane Hazel. I was a 5-year-old living in Philly. My sister turned one-year-old the day Hazel hit us. Baruch Hashem today we are both grandmothers living in Eretz Yisroel.