Poll: Only 39 Percent Approve Of NYC Mayor de Blasio’s Job Performance

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debOnly thirty-nine percent of registered New York City voters believe Mayor Bill de Blasio’s has done a “good” or “excellent” job during his first two months in City Hall, according to a poll released Thursday.

More than half of the voters polled rated his performance “fair” or “poor,” according to the Marist College/The Wall Street Journal/WNBC poll. Just ten percent of voters gave de Blasio the highest “excellent” mark while 29 percent categorized his performance as good.

De Blasio, the city’s first Democratic mayor in 20 years, took office January 1 after capturing 73 percent of the vote in a landslide victory in November.

(AP)


6 COMMENTS

  1. To Commenter No. 1: Thank you for asking. My spin: these numbers reflect the grumpiness brought on by the horrible weather of the last 2 months. I have not heard from De Blasio’s detractors what they consider his failings of his first 60+ days in office.

    Let’s consider what has happened so far:

    1. A colossal amount of snow fell on the city, and the Department of Sanitation successfully removed it – or at least pushed most of it out of the way.

    2. The mayor is following through on his idea to establish a city-wide preschool education system, though he and Gov. Cuomo are disputing how to fund it.

    3. Crime has not exploded – or even increased a little – since the Police Department reduced or eliminated the stop-and-frisk procedure.

    4. The faux scandal of the driving of the mayor’s vehicle by the police department has blown over, though it is too soon to evaluate whether his program to increase pedestrian safety is working.

    5. He has declined to provide rent-free classroom space to charter schools, notwithstanding support for that give-away from many of his black supporters.

  2. To Commenter No. 1 and my millions of followers: I am sorry that my comment ended abruptly – my computer submitted it before I was finished. So here is the balance of my comment:

    The five items I listed are not necessarily exhaustive of all that can be said about the mayor’s conduct of his first 60+ days in office, and anyone who can add to that list – favorably or unfavorably to the mayor – should do so.

    And let me correct or modify item 5: I do not know for certain that the black parents who are portrayed in those commercials attacking the mayor’s refusal to subsidize charter schools were actual DeBlasio supporters, and so my implication that the mayor was standing by his convictions
    in opposing free classrooms for charter schools may not be correct. I also emphasize that charter school parents – and other parents who choose to send their kids to the non-public schools of the city (e.g., yeshivas, Catholic parochial schools, fundamentalist Xian schools) – pay the same taxes as parents who send their kids to public schools, and there is a tough question about whether taxpayer money should support parents who find the public schools unacceptable. But that is not a problem that the mayor created, and he has not fully addressed it so far, and I have not heard a sound solution to this problem.

    May I now please here from Commenter No. 1?

  3. I think War and Peace might be a bit shorter than comments #3 and #4. I got through about 2 lines of the blather and forgot what the topic was about, took a nap, davened mincha, came back and started re-reading the comments only to once again fail to get through all the muck written. So instead I just skipped to the last line where I was being called out to respond to this drivel. So here’s what I think: If you’re gonna call me out at least know the difference between “here” and “hear” when you’re doing it.

  4. Re Comment 5:

    a) War and Peace is longer, but I am flattered by the comparison to great literature (even if I have not read it).

    b) Thoughtful political discussion is boring. Impulsive outbursts and political sloganeering are much more fun.

    c) I noticed my here/hear mistake after I submitted it but before the moderators posted my comment. Perhaps the moderators should prohibit any comment with a mispelling.