Ban On Non-Citizens Entering Israel To Be Eased For Business Tourists

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Ben-Gurion Airport

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Israel is easing the blanket ban against all non-Israeli citizens from entering the country which has been in place since March due to the coronavirus pandemic, Globes reported on Sunday.

Businesspeople who obtain special permits will be allowed to enter Israel from “green” countries, the Economy Ministry stated. The business tourists will not need to present a negative coronavirus test or enter quarantine upon arrival and will be allowed to visit for up to seven days.

Those traveling to Israel on a connecting flight via a “red country” can still enter Israel without needing to quarantine as long as they didn’t leave the airport in the red country and were there for less than 12 hours.

“Entry to Israel will be possible only for visitors whose contribution to Israeli companies or the economy is vital and only in situations where it is not possible to conduct virtual meetings,” the ministry stated. “This is in order to allow the continued proper functioning of Israeli companies and to prevent damage to them or the economy during the coronavirus pandemic.”

As of last week, there were 34 countries on Israel’s list of green countries, including Australia, Greece, Serbia, the UAE, Italy, Canada, Japan, and Rwanda. However Greece will probably be changed to a “red country” this week and it’s possible that Italy, which has been experiencing a surge of coronavirus cases in recent days, will be declared red as well.

The Economy Ministry formulated the plan to allow business tourists into the country together with the Health Ministry, the Foreign Ministry and the Interior Ministry.

(YWN Israel Desk – Jerusalem)



4 COMMENTS

  1. What about the all important business of visiting my children in Israel whom I haven’t seen in over 2 years:- Isn’t this vital/essential business to save their moral health so they don’t become a depression issue on the overburdened Israel health system?
    Israel is currently guilty of breaking up nuclear families, as long as they don’t admit immediate family members.
    Isn’t coming to Israel for a date also essential business that cannot be conducted “virtual”?

  2. So let me get this straight? The ban started when, 6-8 months ago, and you haven’t seen your children in 2 years? So now that there is a ban you can’t see them? What about the previous 18 months when you could have gone! Who were we blaming then?