Police to Enforce Collective Punishment to Prevent Peleg & Other Extremist Protests

10

Jerusalem Police are changing tactic in how they deal with extremist Chareidi elements who block streets, light garbage on fire, and cause severe amounts of vandalism during their protests throughout the city. These protests are generally viewed as Chareidi youth letting loose for the sake of running wild and have little if any bearing on any political or social ideology.

In an effort to prevent the extremist protests from happening even before they begin, police are adopting a new strategy. Insead of only implementing highly localized arrests of those at the protests themselves, from now on, the police will be going after the heads of the communities that support the protesters, as well as those who are more normative in the same communities as the protesters even if they are not connected to the protests themselves.

Police are beginning a general raid to deal with crimes in the areas of traffic and civilian responsibility. Transgressions that will now have an extra level of enforcement in the fields of tax evasion and the lack of reporting taxes. The logic behind the switch is that if the extremists make the lives of other Israelis more difficult, then by making the lives of those in the same community as the protesters tougher, then people will want to prevent the protest even before it happens and thereby apply community pressure on to the protesters to change before they even begin.

(YWN Israel Desk – Jerusalem)




10 COMMENTS

  1. That’s a terrible tactic. It will make moderates angry at the government and won’t prevent any violence.

    The Israeli gov is going after the peaceful people. This will backfire by making more people angry and as prone to protests and violence to vent their anger.

  2. The police should be going after the parents. And then the parents will go after the school staff who permit or encourage the demonstrations. A large proportion of the protesters are literally children. Allowing your child to go out in the street to stop traffic, burn trash, etc. is negligence. And if you know the kid is going to get grabbed by the police, at risk of injury, it’s also child abuse. Start prosecuting the parents, and see if that doesn’t put a brake on the trouble.

  3. Peleg , you are a big bore! Go learn Torah!

    Gaza riots, American Embassy, Nikki Haley, Iran, Hamas, Shavuos coming up…. too many exciting events to ponder, talk about & daven for.

  4. When the nazi ymach shemom went through village’s if they wanted to punish the village they took out innocent individuals and shot them
    Surely the Israeli police are there to uphold the law and not be judge and jury

  5. Collective punishment, preemptive punishment and all actions of police prior to the commitment of a crime or the prevention of a crime that is obviously about to be committed are human rights violations. Furthermore, such actions are not even legal under Israeli law.

  6. I usually don’t think Nazi comparisons are appropriate, but in this case the similarity cannot be ignored. What these protesters do is unequivocally wrong, and they should be punished, but how can that be extended to include punishing innocents? Who gave them the right to arrest people, throw them in jail, etc. for having done nothing wrong? Since when is guilt by association a thing?

  7. Loshenhora, although it’s hard to understand what you are saying, the police are not judging or being a jury to these demonstrators. The Peleg demonstrators will merely be arrested and imprisoned for illegal actions or causing harm, damage, or theft for others.

  8. Peleg belong in jail; they do NOT learn Torah. About Torah it says, that its ways are the ways of pleasantness, and the ways of Peleg are about causing problems to every one.

    Put them all in jail or send them to Gaza….

  9. In other words the police have officialy given up on dealing with the Peleg problem. They realized that mass arrests don’t deter the protests and in fact just continue the cycle further. Instead the police have switched to an approach which they can say ‘it takes time’, thereby sparing the police from more shame whenever they are unable to disperse the protests.