Boosting Boosters: Hochul & de Blasio Get Extra Jabs

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In this image from video, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, left, receives a COVID-19 Moderna vaccine booster from New York City Health Commissioner Dr. Dave Chokshi, during the mayor's daily news briefing, Monday, Oct, 25, 2021. New York Gov. Kathy Hochul and Mayor Bill de Blasio each received COVID-19 boosters Monday as part of their efforts to promote widespread vaccinations. (Office of the New York Mayor via AP)

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New York Gov. Kathy Hochul and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio separately received COVID-19 booster shots Monday as part of their efforts to promote widespread vaccinations.

The two Democrats, who received their shots at different events, were eligible because they had each received the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine earlier this year.

De Blasio, 60, got a booster shot of the Moderna vaccine from city Health Commissioner Dr. Dave Chokshi during the mayor’s regular online news briefing.

“Give me a boost, Dave,” de Blasio said.

Hochul, 63, got a Moderna booster at a public ribbon cutting at the Decker College of Nursing and Health Sciences in Johnson City, near Binghamton.

“Didn’t even feel a thing,” she said to applause.

(AP)


4 COMMENTS

  1. I am looking to make an informed decision whether or not to get vaccinated. Does anyone know where I can find answer to the following two questions?
    1. What percent of hospitalized COVID patients right now are: vaccinated, unvaccinated (never had COVID before), unvaccinated (recovered from a previous COVID infection)?
    2. What percent of COVID deaths last month were: vaccinated, unvaccinated (never had COVID before), unvaccinated (recovered from a previous COVID infection)?

  2. gjboy, your question is confusing as this number will change based on number of vaccinated, their age groups, and behavior. The question you need to ask is: what is your chance to get infected/sick/very sick if you are vaccinated v. if you are not. The answers seem to be consistent across the age groups (presuming you were not sick before): after vaccination, your chance to be infected is 20 times less, 6 months later – 7 times less. your chance to get very sick stays stable at about 10 times lower. If you were sick before, most likely answer is that you will benefit from one vaccine dose. May depend on how your infection/immunity event went taht you can verify with an antibody test. [disclaimer: I am not a real doctor]