chatzkal

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  • in reply to: Why its important to show pictures of Married Couples #1366228
    chatzkal
    Participant

    Why don’t you ask the Shevet Levi’s son or other talmidim what he held about pictures of woman in frum media? While your point is well taken and as any true tzadik would he had the utmost love and respect for his wife I’m not sure he would’ve been happy about using a picture of him to prove a point he may not have agreed with.

    in reply to: Why do many chasidish yeshivas start on rosh chodesh cheshvan #1365884
    chatzkal
    Participant

    Chasidish yeshivas also have an Elum zman, it just ends by the first slichos. Most Chasidish yeshivas do not have a full Av bein hazmanim as Litvishe yeshivas do, they have maybe a week after Tisha B’Av.

    in reply to: Why do many chasidish yeshivas start on rosh chodesh cheshvan #1364834
    chatzkal
    Participant

    Litvishe yeshivas also start on rosh chodesh cheshvan.

    in reply to: men going to mikvah on shabbos #1152696
    chatzkal
    Participant

    It’s permitted under all circumstances as long as you don’t dry any hair with a towel and are careful not to carry anything where there is no eruv.

    in reply to: Father-in-law at Aufruf #1150112
    chatzkal
    Participant

    The word “aufruf” means being “called up” (to get an aliya).

    in reply to: Father-in-law at Aufruf #1150110
    chatzkal
    Participant

    Bklyner: I’ve never heard about this “growing trend” but actually a chooson having an aliya the Shabbos before the chasuna is a chiyuv, atleast by Ashkenazim. The Sefardim I believe hold the Shabbos after the chasuna is a chiyuv. Having said this I doubt very highly that what you call the “litvish crowd” (who by the way 90% of their ancestors were Hungarians and never stepped foot into Lita) have any such growing trend. If someone wants to play down the party and both sides want to chip in for a joint celebration the week of Shabbos sheva berachos that’s their business but it doesn’t take away the chiyuv of “aufruf”, being called up for an aliya the Shabbos before one’s chasuna.

    in reply to: Father-in-law at Aufruf #1150105
    chatzkal
    Participant

    The little I know: “In Skver, the minhag is that the chosson’s father does NOT attend the aufruf at all. If he happens to daven at the same shul, he may be there. etc…” First of all I think you meant the “kallah’s father”. Second of all, as we all know, there is only ONE shul in Skver…

    in reply to: How do you address people of the opposite sex? #1138094
    chatzkal
    Participant
    in reply to: Signs put up around BMG, Lakewood #1136824
    chatzkal
    Participant

    This is obviously a joke and a figment of someones imagination. And if any real sign was put up it has no backing and few if any people will listen to it. But the truth is, the is not a new concept. In some chassidishe circles, bachurim wear “kashketlach” in the weekdays instead of regular biber hits for this very purpose, the fact that they are more affordable. Kashketlach are small caps worn by children under bar mitzvah on Shabbos in some chassdish circles. Similar to what the Chofetz Chaim is known to have worn. In many places in Europe, even men wore them during the week.

    in reply to: a response to the hateful comments on the satmar rebbe #1134679
    chatzkal
    Participant

    “And you know what, most people who are not chabad respect them and like them even if they arent chbad” Not sure where you’ve been hangin around the past 35 years or so. Having said that, you know what, i’m not Chabad either and I’m not Satmar, but not speaking bad about any fellow Yidden is a mitzvah we all have and should keep. There are all kinds all over,we shouldn’t be stereotyping.

    in reply to: Different havaras #1100618
    chatzkal
    Participant

    It has do do with the region and nothing to do with “Chassidish or Litvish”. Lita is a country, not a way of life and there were many Chassidim there. There are many Chassidim such as Slonim, Stolin, and Lubavitch who speak with a so-called “Litvish havara” and there were many non-Chassidim in Poland and Hungary who spoke with a so-called “Chassidish havara”. Even today, if you go to Krakow you will hear the goyim there say “the Ramu”. The Gra in all likelihood said neither “oh” or “oi” but “ay” as the old Litvisher Yidden pronounced it. The local languages influenced all havaros and no one can claim one is more “correct” than the others are. R. Moishe Zt”l has a teshuva about being yoitze hearing other havaras and about saying anything out loud (shliach tzibur, baal koreh, aliya) according to the minhag hamakom. It is entirely possible that there were originally different havaras among the shevatim just as the Ariza”l says that each shevet had a separate nusach hatefila. You see a few places in nach and shas where various people had different ways to pronounce words.

    in reply to: Litvishe Gedolim respecting Chasiddishe Gedolim #894150
    chatzkal
    Participant
    in reply to: Litvishe Gedolim respecting Chasiddishe Gedolim #894142
    chatzkal
    Participant

    “Lets make a list of Gedolim from Lita” – Out of the 8 gedolim you mention only 2, Reb Chaim Brisker & Reb Chaim Ozer Grodzinski were from Lita. Rabbi Akiva Eiger and the Chofetz Chaim were from Poland, Reb Chaim Volozhiner, Reb Itzele Volozhiner & Reb Boruch Ber Leibowitz were from Belarus and the Chasam Sofer from Hungary. “Litvish” is one of the most misused expressions today. Most people who call themselves “Litvish” have no ancestors who ever lived in Lita.

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