Shmiras Haloshon

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  • in reply to: Pruzbul Time #2127777
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    In EY the minhag is for anyone who has a bank account to have a pruzbul, including young children who get money from Bituach Leumi every month.

    in reply to: “Frum” female singers on YouTube #2111931
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    Quote: “(And even during the fast forwarding you’d see it again in fast motion until you find the place where it ends.)”

    We don’t fast forward it. We skip ahead until we get to the men dancing again.

    in reply to: “Frum” female singers on YouTube #2111233
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    Quote (sorry I don’t know the right way to do this): “This is all before discussing the related severe problem of photographers taking videos of women dancing at Chasunas. Can anyone name even a single Posek or Rov whoever permitted this? Otherwise, what’s the heter of taking videos that WILL be displayed and viewed by men? Does anyone know of any cases where the men in the family run out of the room when it starts showing the women dancing while playing the Chasuna video? Even if they do run out, they’re too late.”

    In Eretz Yisroel, it’s common to have a female photographer for the women’s side.

    When we show our children’s wedding videos to the family, we skip the parts that have women dancing. I’m sure we’re not the only ones.

    in reply to: Israeli Parenting style vs the US. #2099910
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    While in general Israeli parenting a lot more relaxed than American parenting, this was a special situation and we should not be judging.

    in reply to: Where do Israeli Charedim vacation? #2075317
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    Mostly up north. The entire north of the country fills up with Chareidim during bein hazmanim. That includes Tzfat, Tiveria, Haifa, Afula, Karmiel, etc.

    in reply to: Home-made challah #1552640
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    WTP, it depends on your mixer. I make 16 cups of flour every week and it fits into my Bosch quite nicely, though I can’t leave it there to rise. I mix it all at once in the mixer and then transfer it to a larger bowl.

    in reply to: Nebulizers on Shabbos #1446201
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    SH: For which illness? My children were on a nebulizer for bronchitis/bronchiolitis/ RSV.

    Any of the above plus asthma. Really anything you would use a nebulizer for. There are parents who insist that the nebulizer works more effectively on their children than an inhaler with an Aerochamber, but most doctors say that the studies show otherwise. In any case, it’s worth a try because it’s so much easier to use the Aerochamber, especially on young kids who don’t have a hard time sitting still for as long as it takes for the nebulizer to work.

    in reply to: Nebulizers on Shabbos #1445211
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    Use an inhaler with an Aerochamber instead. It takes 30 seconds per puff and studies show it to be at least as effective as a nebulizer, if not more so. And no chillul Shabbos necessary.

    in reply to: Using Baby name Sivan help #1379731
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    Sivan is quite a common name in Eretz Yisroel. In America, it’s pretty much unheard of.

    in reply to: anyone here has aphantasia? #1335523
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    “Oddly enough it is the very opposite of the way people on the spectrum think. Temple Grandin calls it ‘thinking in pictures’.”

    I have a child on the spectrum who seems to think in pictures. When he describes something they did in gan, he’ll give lots of detail about little irrelevant things in the room and will even point in various directions to show me where the window is and where the nail in the wall is and where the cracked tile is even though we’re obviously at home and not in his gan. He seems to take a picture of it all with his eyes and store it in his mind. He can also memorize the contents of a paper by reading it once or twice. Pretty fascinating.

    in reply to: Calling cops on frum neighbor #1335517
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    “1) I have neighbours who scream at each other all the time, they’re in their 80s and have probably been married for 40+ years. Point being: there is a possibility they are just the type of people who scream, not good but not necessarily violent. Consider that the Rov may have more knowledge about the case which he isn’t at liberty to reveal.”

    Maybe they’re hard of hearing?

    in reply to: Peanut Ban in Schools 🚫🥜🏫💉 #1304721
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    Syag Lchochma,

    “you may be unaware that the reality is that your child’s name will come up frequently, every week for several years, when requesting, purchasing and packing snacks.”

    I am aware, and this is one of the reasons I was opposed to a peanut ban lechatchila. But sometimes it’s about choosing the lesser of 2 evils.

    in reply to: Peanut Ban in Schools 🚫🥜🏫💉 #1304722
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    “Lightbrite, soy butter is a lie. It superficially resembles peanut butter, but tastes more like sawdust.”

    Sunbutter might be somewhat closer to peanut butter in taste.

    in reply to: Peanut Ban in Schools 🚫🥜🏫💉 #1304681
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    Just want to add that I wasn’t saying necessarily that all that justified a peanut ban. For my child, the decision was made based on safety alone. Still, I wanted to point out that that solution might not be optimal for every child.

    in reply to: Peanut Ban in Schools 🚫🥜🏫💉 #1304678
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    “I believe DY’s point was that it’s not possible that all a kid will eat is peanut butter. If peanut butter simply wasn’t an option, the kid will find something else to eat.”

    Thanks. I realized this sometime between Modeh Ani and negel vasser this morning.

    in reply to: Peanut Ban in Schools 🚫🥜🏫💉 #1304677
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    Syag Lchochma,

    “Who said anything about eating alone? And why in the world would you direct that at me when I specifically said that they should NOT eat alone. And what is the point of having a conversation when people can’t respectfully read what you say before throwing comments back in your face.”

    First of all, I apologize if I did not read your words carefully before responding.

    Secondly, I was using the word “alone” loosely to mean not eating where everyone else eats. And that was in response to this:

    “In our school, those kids have the privilege of choosing two or three friends a day to have “special lunch” with them in the office. Yes, it actually is very good for that child.”

    That really does sound nice for some kids, but again, it is a form of singling out, and we try as much as possible to avoid doing that. There are times when it’s impossible, but in school, I wish that would not be the case. My daughter prefers not to have special privileges. She really just wants to be a regular kid.

    in reply to: Peanut Ban in Schools 🚫🥜🏫💉 #1304485
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    “I’ll ask again what I asked earlier: if a kid is allergic to peanuts but all he likes is peanut butter, does he not eat in school?”

    I read this twice and still don’t understand it, perhaps because I really should be in bed. If a kid is allergic to peanuts, how can all he like be peanut butter? My kid who’s allergic to peanuts has obviously never eaten peanut butter.

    I get the feeling I will feel really dumb when I read this again in the morning.

    in reply to: Peanut Ban in Schools 🚫🥜🏫💉 #1304481
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    Syag Lchochma,

    I prefer my daughter not eat alone and it’s unrelated to being inconvenienced. On the contrary, I’ve always preferred that I be the one who’s inconvenienced rather than other parents and children. The fact is that kids like mine will often stand out. She frequently has to step out of parties, weddings, class events, etc. because a peanut dish is served. She never complains about it, but I know she does not enjoy the attention. Her friends are very dedicated to her and she’s never alone outside, but she really just wants to be like everyone else. School is one place where she should be safe and allowed to be just a regular kid if it’s possible. Eating alone, even with a couple of friends, smacks a label on her that says “different.” Which she obviously is, but she would like to be able to forget that sometimes.

    Also, after what we’ve experienced, I would not feel safe with hundreds of girls eating peanut butter in the lunchroom and then going out to play in the same place as my daughter. Even if they’re told to wash their hands, 100% compliance is not guaranteed, and sometimes clothing can also pick up traces of peanut butter.

    I feel like I sound like I expect everyone to bend over backwards for my child, and believe me, that could not be further from the truth. I want to attract as little attention as possible to her allergies and just have her life run seamlessly, but I sometimes have to do things I don’t like to in order to keep her safe.

    in reply to: Peanut Ban in Schools 🚫🥜🏫💉 #1303877
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    Syag Lchochma,

    I’m sorry; I did not understand your post. Who else is demanding a peanut ban besides parents of peanut-allergic children? I’m unaware of such a bandwagon and don’t understand why this is of concern to anyone else.

    in reply to: Peanut Ban in Schools 🚫🥜🏫💉 #1303848
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    Syag Lchochma,

    I belong to an online support group for parents of food-allergic children, and there’s much discussion there about the best way to handle food allergies in school. Based on conversations I’ve been privy to there, I can assure you that by and large the parents who request peanut bans in their children’s schools do so out of fear, not out of trendiness.

    in reply to: Peanut Ban in Schools 🚫🥜🏫💉 #1303723
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    Just want to add: Thanks very much for your brachos. Wishing you back good health and a long life.

    in reply to: Peanut Ban in Schools 🚫🥜🏫💉 #1303722
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    Syag Lchochma,

    She was 8 years old at the time and was not yet self-injecting so having her EpiPen on her would not have solved the problem. (She started self-injecting at 12.) We did insist that her EpiPen be in her classroom and not in the office, and whenever they went to another classroom or to the yard, she did have it in a waistpack, but she was allowed to go to the bathroom (right across the hall) without it and that is not what caused this to happen. The fact was that she was alone and nobody saw her at the time she reacted. Yes, I did write in my previous post that her EpiPen was back in her classroom as if it was an important factor in the story, but it really wasn’t since having it on her when she can’t use it wouldn’t have helped. As soon as her teacher was notified, she came running with the EpiPen so no time was wasted.

    I’m not so sure “trying it the other way” is a wise choice because there are unfortunately times that there’s no second chance.

    in reply to: Peanut Ban in Schools 🚫🥜🏫💉 #1303717
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    I rarely post here, but after watching this thread for the past few days, I feel a need to share our story.

    My teenage daughter has a severe allergy to peanuts. When she entered gan, I did not request that peanuts be banned from the gan. I just asked the gananot to be scrupulous about hand washing for those girls who brought peanut butter. It worked…until it didn’t. I’m not sure exactly what went wrong, but one day right after they ate, the girls were playing in the yard and the ganenet noticed that my daughter was covered with hives. That quickly progressed to facial and tongue swelling and difficulty breathing. She was given an EpiPen and after 3 days in the hospital, she was fine. She went back to gan, but the ganenet insisted on a peanut ban after that. I hated drawing attention to her allergy, but I understood that the ganenet did not want to experience that again.

    Fast forward to starting kitah aleph. I specifically told the principal that I did not see a need for a peanut ban in the whole school, but I suggested that perhaps her classroom could be a peanut-free zone and that if there were girls in the class who wanted to eat peanut butter, maybe they could go eat in the parallel classroom that day. She agreed to that and we got through almost 3 years of school with no incidents. Then, toward the end of 3rd grade, my daughter walked into the bathroom where another girl was washing her hands after eating peanut butter. My daughter could smell and feel the peanut butter as soon as she entered the room, so she walked out right away, but it was too late. She felt her throat swell and could not swallow or breathe, and her EpiPen was back in her classroom. She passed out before making it back to her classroom, and by the time someone noticed her, she was in serious distress. BH her teacher was quick and she ran to her with her EpiPen and injected it on the spot and saved her life. She spent 2 weeks in the hospital recovering and this time, I was the one who requested that the school ban peanuts. The principal wholeheartedly agreed and said she had intended to do that even without me asking.

    That’s our story. You decide if peanut bans are necessary.

    in reply to: How do I contact the editor of YWN? #1211290
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    I think I know what you’re referring to that got by by mistake. It’s still there now. I’m going to contact the editor through the Contact page as well. He has responded to me in the past that way.

    in reply to: shidduch advice #1218104
    Shmiras Haloshon
    Participant

    I think rebshidduch is female. Am I correct?

Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 25 total)