Kosher Food Companies Pledge to Reduce or Maintain Prices For Pesach

7

hikind1.jpgIn response to a letter sent earlier this month to the CEOs of leading kosher food companies, Assemblyman Dov Hikind (D-Brooklyn) today announced that four major distributors have agreed to reduce or maintain prices for their Pesach items this year.

Mr. Shia Friedman of Reisman Bakery has agreed to lower the price of Pesach baked goods and sell them to stores at a 15% discount. Messrs. David Weinberger of Golden Flow and Larry Farkas of Mehadrin Dairy have indicated that their respective milk prices will remain at their current levels. Mr. Schneur Bistritzky of Ahava Food Company told the Assemblyman that because of his commitment to his fellow Jews, and in light of the fiscal hardships confronting many in our community, Ahava has lowered its prices on a host of core items, including milk. Bistritzky said milk will be sold to stores for Pesach at a reduction of as much as 25 to 40 cents less per half gallon.

“I am heartened by the responsible actions these distributors have taken to ease the financial burden of those suffering in the Orthodox Jewish community,” Hikind said. “I am hopeful that their decision to either lower or maintain prices on food products for Pesach will inspire other major distributors to follow suit. These four companies are to be commended for doing the right thing in these trying economic times.”

(YWN Desk – NYC)



7 COMMENTS

  1. There is still no excuse why “Cholov Yisroel” should cost 40%-50% more than cho;ov stam.
    The cost of a mashgiach is minimal as everything is automated and the volume produced.
    This is also true with poultry. Next time you go to a supermarket take a look at the non-kosher price of chicken and ask yourself if it really costs that much (150%-200% more) to shecht a chicken.

  2. HOW ABOUT THE PRICE OF THE MATZOHS IT SEEMS THEY HAVE A MONOPOLY ON THE PRICE IT’S ABOUT TIME SOMETHING SHOULD BE DONE ABOUT THOSE PRICE IT’S RIDICULOS A POUND OF MATZOHS AT $22 PER POUND

  3. How about sheitels, and especially the cost of cutting one. Getting a woman’s haircut costs well under $100, but the minute it’s a sheitel it’s triple the price!

  4. There is a greater risk in cutting a sheitel- the hair won’t grow back and you don’t need a cut every 3 months so it is priced accordingly.

  5. It is wonderful that the supplier lowered their prices, the question is will the stores follow up or take the lower prices and still el for the old high. As a response to # 1, unfortunately you are not aware of the expenses of kosher products and the laws of supply and demand. Kosher food is a limited market and cannot compete in prices. However, I will agree with you that the prices are a bit high. Especially that Rubashkin is now out of business for a wile the meat prices went up. In any case, kosher market cannot compete with non-kosher in prices.