Extremist ‘Taliban’ Chasnah in Bnei Brak

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There was a unique chasnah in Bnei Brak earlier this week, a young couple affiliated with the shawl chareidim or “Taliban” as some prefer to call the women who are literally covered from head to toe.

Only invited guests were permitted in, making sure no one crashed the simcha event. Those responsible for setting up arrived hours ahead of the simcha to cover the windows and set the double mechitza into place. The mechitza was unusually high, as well as two layers of heavily lined material to make absolutely certain the view was totally blocked from either side.

Every possible effort was made to eliminate any possibility of any eye contact between men and women throughout the simcha.

The photographer remained on the men’s side only, and there were no photos of the women at all, not videos or stills.

What some feel was the ‘icing on the cake’ was the mechitza under the chupah. There was separation between chosson and kallah, as well as between the couple and the men and women. In short, when the curtain was moved briefly between chosson and kallah during the chupah numerous times, the guests did not see the other.

There was total and absolute separation, even when it came to serving. Waiters were compelled to place food at a designated station near but outside the women’s area, and volunteers among the female guests served the food only after they confirmed the waiters had gone.

According to a Chadrei Chareidim report, the mesader kedushin stood on the men’s side under the chupah and opened the mechitza under the chupah to make certain the kallah was present and then began with the ceremony. When it came time to place the ring on the kallah’s finger, a small opening in the curtain was made and the ring was placed on the kallah’s finger and the curtain was shut.




42 COMMENTS

  1. In her popular book “All for the Boss,” Rav Yaakov Yosef Herman’s daughter tells what it was like to be at a wedding in America in the 1920’s.

    Men and women danced together, and the kashrus of the food was a real question.

    So, we go from one extreme to the other, illustrating the truth of Newton’s law: “Every action compels and equal and opposite reaction.”.

  2. My impression is that there is no balance now. The extreme separation is an extreme reaction to the lack of modesty that is so pervasive.

    Anyway … I wish the couple a life of joy. If this works for them (esp. the wife).

  3. I’m embarrassed to have read this story. What are we in Saudi Arabia? Say what you will but this is over the top. A chasanah is a beautiful thing. A chosson and Kallah getting married nothing is better, this makes it seem like some top secret illegal affair dealing with non consenting people.

  4. The above “story” is a bubbe maaisa. Someone played a joke on a reporterette, and it took off from there. Nothing of the sort ever happened.

  5. “How did the chatan know that the father in law didn’t trick him and give him the older daughter instead of the younger one?”

    I get the feeling that the chatan never saw her and wouldn’t know or care anyways.

  6. Real frum people wouldn’t let women in the hall, and would be Mekkadesh via a Shaliach. These must be fake Taliban.

  7. Only invited guests were permitted in, making sure
    no one crashed the simcha event

    And how would they have known if anybody gatecrashed on the womens side??? ☺

    Would they have given everyone a thickly-veiled threat not to attempt it???

  8. Can someone please be real for a second and find out if this was a spoof or not? There is a lot of excessive hyperbole in this article that makes it sound kind of questionable. Either way though, this is hilarious.

  9. Probably best to go with SAME GENDER marriages so there will be no problem of “mixing and mingling”.

    Absurd and anti-Torah..

  10. Whether the story is true or not, does not concern me. Even if the story is a “bubbe maaseh”, it should at least be theoretically true. However, this last sentence bothered me a lot:

    “When it came time to place the ring on the kallah’s finger, a small opening in the curtain was made and the ring was placed on the kallah’s finger and the curtain was shut.”

    If that description is true, the couple are not married, because the witnesses did not see upon whose finger the ring was slid. Even if we could guess that probably it was the kallah’s finger, guessing is not witnessing.

  11. #7

    I don’t know to which chassidishe chasunas you went to, but this is not anything close to any chassidishe chasuna I went to.

  12. If this is true, it is keneged Torah.

    The couple is likely not married neither medi’oraisa nor medi’rabbanan.

    The good news is they are living in zenus and she doesn’t need a get.

    The bad news, is that she can’t marry a Kohen.

  13. When bobby Chava told the serpent that “she is not allowed to touch the tree” – We all got a death sentence – Moral: Never be frummer that Thou.

  14. #28 – If this Kidushin is not Chal, she would be Muttar LeKohen. A P’nu’ya shezinsa is not Asur to a Kohen, so long as she was not with an Aino Yehudi.

    Note that I’m not opining on the validity of this Kedushin, only pointing out something based on your premise.

    an Israeli Yid

  15. everyone could have stayed home and they could have hooked this up live VIA THE INTERNET!! they would have accomplished the same thing lehalacha ( that they are not married)– see, the asifa got it wrong, here’s the perfect application. tizku l’mitzvos–NOT

  16. Clearly, if the 2 men Eidim haven’t seen the Kallo’s face, the Kiddushin does not conform to K’Das Moshe v’Yisroel.

    Furthermore, the Groom must have met & seen the Bride at least 1 time before the marriage, not to violate “vOhavto leRei’acho Komocho”.

    Furthermore, how would the 2 biological parents have walked their child down to the Chuppo? & Bensched their children? & how would the 2 mothers have smashed the plate at the Chosson’s Tisch?

  17. I visited the Israel Museum the other week and on display were the burqas that the Jewish women from Afghanistan used to wear.

  18. Furthermore, how would the 2 biological parents have walked their child down to the Chuppo?

    Lots of people don’t do that. The fathers walk the chosson and the mothers the kalloh.

    how would the 2 mothers have smashed the plate at the Chosson’s Tisch?

    This is usually done on the women’s side.

  19. Twice in Maseches Shabbos it discusses women wearing “Burqa’s” (once is somewhere in the 6th Perek – see the mishanyos with the pictures).

  20. It is a common custom not to lift the “DEK TICHEL”
    for the Eidei Kiddushin.

    Is the Yeshiva World ok with leaving comments that are Nivul Peh or is the bar so low that the comments are “Yeshivish” ?